Incense

by Bart Arondson

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27

My advice would be to take your camera everywhere you might potentially take pictures. Take reasonable precautions to avoid shocks. If it gets damaged have it fixed. You could keep the camera in its box for ten years and at the end of that period you'd have a pristine camera that would still be worth nothing. So you might as well use it as much as possible ...


14

If you are looking for something that really won't move, I do recall of the Cotton Carrier line of products. The web site isn't that hot, explore it to find pictures and videos. It really does look like a holster though, both on your chest, or at your side. Maybe a sling-type kind of strap would work better for you? I've seen two main competitors on the ...


14

As I spend considerable time, up to 10 hours in a day, hiking around the rain forests of British Columbia as well as the streets and parks of Vancouver I use a backpack and definitely would not be without it. I find it very comfortable to wear and holds my D300 with 7 lenses, 2 flashes and a few ancillary pieces. The comfort of having a well made backpack ...


12

A diaper bag with a foam insert (like the Domke inserts. It's not pretty, but that's the point: it looks exactly like something you don't want to stick your hand into.


12

You can read about all the pros and cons of all bag types at the link below. Basically you must compromise size, weight, comfort and accessibility. No bag fits all uses. The more typical bag for photography is called a messenger bag. Here are the cons of backpacks: Disadvantages: Must be removed to access gear. Working with gear is uncomfortable, usually ...


11

Jay Meisel maintains that it is hard to make good images if you don't take your camera along. So which do you optimize for? Longer lasting equipment you don't use or a possibly shortened lifespan of equipment you use regularly? Here is a quote from one of Jay's students: I haven’t left the house once without a camera and realize it’s impossible to be ...


11

The safest position for your SLR is in your bank's safety deposit box. Once you decide you want to take pictures, you must accept some non-zero risk of damage to your camera. Camera in bag with lens facing up: - Harder/slower to remove camera from bag. - If bag hits ground, you must ship the body off to repair the screen Camera in bag with lens facing ...


9

Keeping the lens on is usually fine, unless your luggage will be subjected to unusually rough treatment, in which case separating the camera body / lens and carefully padding each would be preferable. For transporting multiple lenses, flash etc. a purpose built camera bag is the clear choice. These come in backpack and case forms. See also: Camera bag ...


9

It seems I already wrote the perfect article for you ;) Here it is: Camera Bag Guide The importance is to understand the trade-off between each type of bag in terms of: Carrying size - How much equipment? How heavy? Accessibility - How fast can you get your gear out of it? Comfort - How the weight is distributed? How does it interfere with your movements? ...


7

There are a variety of padded camera bag inserts available at online stores like B&H for very little money that you can fit into a non-camera bag that you can buy elsewhere. I found a bag at an Army Navy store that fit mine perfectly. Photos: http://blog.muddyboots.org/2007/08/diy-stealth-camera-bag.html That bag is not waterproof, but I carry a ...


7

I just got a Think Tank Retrospective 20 and love it. It looks very non-camera bag like, and can fit a ton of gear in it. One thing I will point out is that it was bigger than I thought it would be, but the 20 is the largest model - it fits my body attached to a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens (and actually even fits all that with a 1.7x teleconverter attached as well)! ...


7

Lowpro slingshot is an awesome bag. Has a built in weather cover for light rain, and enough extra storage for keys, wallet, neutral gray card, etc.


7

I use the Think Tank Airport Antidote which not only holds my camera, 6 lenses, flash, teleconverters, and other camera gear, it also holds my laptop and ebook reader. More importantly, it fits inside the carry-on requirements and will slide under the seat of a regional commuter jet.


7

Well many a camera bag has interchangeable dividers that allow you to custom fit the interior compartments - so any of those can be a micro four thirds bag. Since you're going to be throwing the whole kitchen sink your bag ("a camera, a bunch of lenses and some accessories (like extra battery / charger) plus a MacBook Air 11") there's little use in ...


7

Lowepro S&F belt system This system of belt and pouches provides a soultion to lens storeage needs withour requiring a bag as such. You would use pouches to store lenses attached to the belt, when you need to change lens, take it off pop it in a pouch, take the other lens out and pop it on. This system also means that you do not need to have the lens ...


7

That is the classic exact fit problem :) You are looking for something that fits your gear but if it fits more, you declare the whole thing too big. The only way to solve this problem is to walk into a store with your gear and try the bags that look right one-by-one. I always ended up with something the right fit this way. Now, I happen to have a ThinTank ...


6

I think a good rule of thumb for features like this is: if it doesn't proudly declare it, the answer is no. Reviews of the bundle on Adorama contain one which complains that the backpack has a "poor build" and that the fabric that used is "really thin". So that doesn't sound so hopeful. On the other hand, a reviewer on B&H Photo notes: "the bag seems to ...


6

If your bag moves the dial more often then you do, then give the camera to someone who uses it more :) Seriously, while there will be measurably more use, it should be comparatively marginal. Perhaps it will die a day sooner than otherwise but I wouldn't be concerned about this.


6

I don't think it particularly matters. I have multiple different cases from Canon and the default configurations of the cases put the camera in different orientations in each. My shoulder bag puts the camera level with the ground with a small lens attached, just like it would be if I was about to shoot with it. MY backpack offers two different options, ...


5

Crumpler bags are "designed" to not to scream fancy camera bag, however at this point in the game, thieves know that crumpler bags are expensive, and target them anyway. They're good for keeping a low key amongst non-pro thieves, and meet all the requirements you listed. I personally use the 6 Million Dollar Home "messenger" style bag and the Whickey and ...


5

Answering my own question. I did some research and found a few other bags that match my criteria. I don't own them nor I have even seen them in person--just some ideas for other people who are looking for something similar. Lowepro Fastpack 350 Lowepro Primus AW Kata 3N1-30


5

I've got a Tamrac Velocity 8 and love it. It's got good space, is very comfortable, and can be pushed out of the way easily. Plus the accessory system makes it easy to add things like water bottle holders, filter pouch, etc. Also, I was looking at a Tamrac Aero Speed Pack 85 yesterday and was quite impressed by it.


5

For an approximate solution to your problem, here's what I use when backpacking: Put on backpack and fasten hip belt, but not sternum strap Sling the camera diagonally across my body (like a purse) Attach sternum strap over the camera strap This yields a reasonably stable setup, where the camera is sitting by my waist (at about 45o to my right, so it ...


5

You only need to protect your camera when coming in from the cold. If you seal up your camera perfectly airtight all the time you are outside, and then come in and open up the bag, you will still get condensation on it. If you like, carry a ziplock bag around with you, seal up the camera just before you come inside, and wait until it warms up. You should see ...


5

Take a look at this picture: This is how I carry my camera (Nikon D80), 2-3 lenses and a flash. Also a small tripod (not on this picture). Everything is easy and fast to access, and stay in safe while transportation in a backpack (I travel a lot on a bicycle - you probably know how these all shakes there). Bag for the camera is a Lowepro (don't remember ...


5

I use a crumpler 5 million dollar home (aka - 5mdh). It can fit a camera with lens on (can't go bigger than a 24-70mm f/2.8), extra lens and a flash. So it will fit your stuff. It's also nice because it doesn't look like a camera bag and it's over the shoulder like you want.


5

I own the KATA 3N1-33 bag, which I bought mainly for travel. Last year, it cost me about $140, and it seems like you can have it for $115 in the US now. The main advantage I see for this model over the other two KATA bags you mentioned is the top compartment that lets me carry some non-photo stuff that may be needed as a carry-on (you know, ...


5

In my opinion, yes they are. But "worth the price" is something that is highly subjective. The sad fact is that specialty bags carry a higher price, just because. You have to ask yourself, how often do you plan on making use of it? Kata bags are more comfortable, and are more rigid than Lowepro. My first camera backpack was a lowepro and I didn't like ...


5

Once you have your style chosen, then the first thing is to find the right size for you given the circumstances in which you expect to use that bag. Size with camera bags is kind of abstract since equal volume bags may not be able to fit the same equipment due to their shape. The only way I found of solving this is going to a photo store with ALL the ...



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