The Sleeping Giant's Sea Lion

by Jakub

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17

A related problem: just because you're intentionally in burst mode and ready to take a burst of shots, you shouldn't necessarily do it always. A less-important burst might make you miss out on a more-important burst. On digital cameras, there's a "burst buffer" that queues up a series of shots for internal processing. If you take more shots than this buffer ...


16

As a rough rule of thumb, photos tend to be printed at a maximum of 300 dots per inch (dpi), but anywhere from around 240dpi will produce a print that looks sharp when viewed closely. 300dpi means that every 1" × 1" square of print is actually made up of a grid of tiny dots, 300 dots along each side (and therefore 90,000 dots in total). A digital camera's ...


13

It could be to reduce camera shake. I use this technique in a lot and in poor light it can be very effective. Pushing the shutter button causes the camera move a little, so by holding it down for a burst of three, the first image may have some residual movement from your finger, whilst the last image might have some shake as you start to release the shutter, ...


13

Not really - even on non action shots I fire off a couple and usually find that my 2nd or 3rd shot in is the sharpest. The biggest problem now is that you have 2-3 times the number of pictures to go through in post if you took more than you would have normally taken because of this. Its time consuming and its time you could be spending taking more ...


11

The rate is 4 frames per second in either case. The difference is in how long it can keep it up — 67 JPEG files of the "large fine" quality level, or 11 RAW frames. That's because it can basically keep going as long as it has RAM to buffer the files, and has to slow down as soon as it has to actually start saving to relatively pokey flash memory. The limit ...


11

The maximum frame rates are just that - maximum frame rates. There are several things that will reduce the maximum frame rate. High ISO The higher the ISO you have selected, the slower the frame rate will be. Noise Reduction the stronger the in-camera noise reduction selected, the slower the frame rate will be. AI Servo Mode If you are using AI Servo AF ...


10

Was the man really standing still? Sometimes they talk. It's annoying when they talk and they also blink and look weird with their mouth half open. Bursting it may avoid cases of disfigured man half talking. Maybe he was bracketing something? Maybe the man is still now, but tends to move randomly? and so he left it on burst mode.


10

Obviously, the lens cannot focus any faster just because the drive mode is set to burst. The time it takes to focus is the time it takes to focus. What you can do is tell the camera to take the shot without waiting for focus to lock. This is called Release Priority as apposed to Focus Priority. To change that you have to go to the Setup menu and find the ...


9

I don't know why people shoot in burst mode but I shoot in burst mode for the following reasons: It lets you capture the moment and the moments before and the moments after. Sometimes you may go wrong with your judgement about the best moments. I know this is a bad practice but there are a lots of things happening in an event that I have to concentrate on ...


8

You did not say which camera you have and that makes a huge difference. On most DSLRs, you will not encounter any downsides if your camera is set to Focus Priority other than the volume of photos as @rfusca said. If it is set to Release-Priority you may get out-of-focus shots. On compact cameras, the burst-mode often turns off preview and you end up ...


8

I believe you'll need to set the 'release mode' in your camera to 'Continuous' to get it to burst the three shots. Also, reportedly, if your camera is on a self timer it will also take the three shots in a single button press after the time delay.


8

My camera has high speed 6.5 fps and low speed 3 fps. I use 3 fps most of the time. This is good for normal slow situations of people. 333ms is enough time to allow facial expression/eye blinking to change between the shots. 6.5fps is just way too fast and I fill up my CF card too fast and sorting the photos in the end will waste too much time. So I consider ...


7

The speed of the memory card is definitely one constraining factor but as you suspect there are other bottlenecks. First there is the internal memory buffer of the camera. Each camera only has so much RAM installed. When you shoot this buffer is filled first and the camera does what it can to quickly empty the buffer to allow for more shooting. The size of ...


7

I think the realistic answer is that without spending tens of thousands of your preferred currency to set up a proper test environment and test a whole bunch of different cameras there's no real way to know. Presumably the manufacturers test each model of camera to get an idea of how long they will last under continuous use (although I imagine that only the ...


7

Remember, the camera is engineered around the 'burst mode'. The shutter box, mechanics, and computer+buffer are designed to enable and function at 8 frames per second. The electronics can handle even higher throughput of 30 frames per second, but of course without the mechanics of the shutterbox involved. So there would not be any 'downsides' to keeping the ...


7

Consider this: If your camera had twice as much buffer memory it would be able to take roughly twice as many photos before running out of memory, but it would also then take roughly twice as long for the buffer to clear. So after the initial extra 5-10 shots twice a deeper buffer would allow, you would then still be limited to the exact same frame rate you ...


6

I gave up on automatic burst modes when I realized that even with 5 to 10 fps, there's still plenty of time between each shot when shooting e.g. fast paced sports action. For that reason alone, I think it's better to learn to anticipate the moment and press the shutter manually. I think you have much better chances at capturing great shots this way. When ...


6

First, if he took a single photo, it could have been blurred if the camera shook and taking several photos will mean you definitely have one that is clear and not blurred. Also, when he analyses the photos later, he might find that in one, the man blinked, in another, he looked away and in another, someone's hand was in the way. Burst also reduces camera ...


5

As with just about any camera, a buffer will be used to hold a number of shots which are written to the card. Once the buffer fills, the frame rate slows. Even with the fastest cards today, previous generation cameras can't offload their buffer fast enough to sustain a high FPS indefinitely. So, this isn't a new problem to the 1D X or D4, though the speed ...


5

The answer to the simple question -Is 2MP high enough quality to print a 4x6? - Is yes. Especially if these are just being used for "fun" display purposes and not in a professional manner. They also would be suitable for most online use. Diving deeper in to the details of your question though, you are asking if your point and shoot camera is a good ...


5

Memory write speed is one factor so any delays during writing and the camera will have to slow down as the buffer isn't cleared fast enough. It's worth noting that not all raws are the same file size. Nearly all manufacturers employ some form of lossless compression on raw files. The amount of entropy (randomness) determines how much compression reduces the ...


5

Several things can limit the maximum potential frame rate. While sensor read on a mirrorless camera can be very fast, theoretically allowing frame rates above 12, the whole read and image processing pipeline has to support the desired frame rate. In addition to the sensor, you also have the ADC (which may be on or off die, and parallel or not), the image ...


4

We shot round 2 yesterday, and I went back to the 50 to try again. This time, I shot in "AI Focus" mode instead of "AI Servo" mode, and the 50 worked great. This left me feeling a bit unsatisfied, however, because I couldn't really explain why I was seeing the results I was seeing. The user manual, for instance, implies that AI Servo should be ideal for ...


4

A good resource for translating megapixels into print sizes is here, but generally at 200 PPI* - the results should be OK. There may be a whole host of other issues in shooting sports but it depends on your expectations. Your camera may not be able to focus fast enough and in general, shooting sports requires a good deal of anticipation of the action - ...


4

The amount of data to save to the memory card is one of several factors which affect framerate. As you've noted, big RAW files can drag things down. Saving smaller files — lower resolution or higher compression — can work around this limitation. But at some point, other limitations, like physical shutter speed, come into effect. If you've hit one of those, ...


4

Canon 1D X Photo size of this camera should be somewhere in range of 20-30 mb, and with 12 frames per second that sums up to need to write down 300mb/s, or if we consider that the camera has dual card slot, this would amount to 150 mb/s per card (does this work this way?). Is there anything on market that would sustain such a write speed? Short: ...


4

If it was exactly 3 photos per shutter press, they were most likely using bracketing rather than simple burst shooting. Bracketing can be used for a number of different purposes, but the concept is that it takes some aspect of the camera and changes the setting between shots. Exposure, Flash Power, White Balance, Focus, etc can all be varied slightly to ...


3

On DSLRs, 99% of times, the frame rate stays the same regardless of resolution. Yours is one exception but not the only one. The Pentax K20D for example shot at 20 FPS at 1 MP. From capture to storage there are a chain of events happening and the frame rate is limited by the slowest step: AF, Metering, Exposure (Shutter), Mirror, Reading sensor, converting ...


3

Generally, a DSLR has a fixed maximum frame rate, and it will take images at that rate until the memory buffer is full. After that the rate drops depending on how fast the images can be converted and written to the memory card. The Canon 1100D has two different maximum frame rates, 2 fps for RAW format and 3 fps for JPEG format: "Continuous: 2 fps up to ...


3

One downside I experienced was: When I did not want to shoot multiple pictures, I had to release the shutter right after pressing it. No problem, until I remarked that I did not hold the camera as steady as before anymore since my hand was already prepared to release the shutter. I usually keep Sigle Frame mode where I do not need to worry whether my finger ...



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