Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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22

The bulb mode is simply a mode where you control the exposure time by holding down the shutter release button. The name comes from the time when the shutter was controlled by a rubber bulb at the end of a hose. You compressed the bulb to open the shutter, and it would stay open as long as you held the bulb compressed. Bulb mode is mostly used when you want ...


10

1) It is a shutter speed where the photographer taking the picture can control the shutter speed manually. So basically you can have a shutter speed from a couple of fractions of a second to hour. Depends how long you can hold that shutter button. But you could also use a remote release to do this job for you. 2) If i remember right its a very only ...


7

What you are probably looking for is a 10-stop ND filter. Lee and Hitech make large square filters - Lee calls theirs the "big stopper". B+W make a screw-in version that is less expensive. These will roughly allow for 1000 times the exposure. So instead of 1/250th of a second, you can expose for 1000 * 1/250 = 4 seconds. If you want even longer ...


5

All DSLRs have a Bulb mode which lets you open the shutter for a user-controlled time-interval. This is what you are looking for. Plenty of SLDs have it too. There is a catch though! The amount time the shutter can be left open has a rarely documented limit on the vast majority of digital cameras. Sometimes it is in the order of a few minutes and sometimes ...


4

Most of the cameras that I know have separate Bulb mode and shutter priority, the Bulb can be in the manual mode and you can get it by increasing the shutter speed till you get bulb (Like in some Canon models). But it's not reasonable to make it attached with the shutter priority mode because the camera wouldn't know in advance how long you are going to open ...


4

Take a look at page 100 of the manual. It explains how to use Bulb mode. Put the camera into Manual(M) mode using the top dial, then turn the dial to the left to select BULB. You can also use an intervalometer to capture long exposures of varying times more accurately then in the bulb mode.


4

Now that I know for sure... :) The ML-3 can do bulb mode. Set the camera to bulb and the remote to continuous (C) and as long as you hold the button (and maintain IR connection) the shutter should remain open. See this Photography Life article for some info. For completeness, the ML-L3 IR remote (the other I asked you about) can also do bulb on supported ...


4

You need an ND filter to get long exposures in daylight as others have noted. However this will probably still not give you the results you need. Long exposure shots of cars work at night time because the car head/tail lights are brighter than anything else in the scene. During the day all you will get with a long exposure shot of cars going by is a muddy ...


3

Short: In most cases "BULB" is a speed setting accessible only in MANUAL mode so you will have full control of aperture and ISO settings. Longer: "Bulb" mode is the ultimate manual mode. Bulb is accessible in Manual mode and MAY be accessible in Shutter-speed priority mode. It COULD have a setting of its own but is usually at the low end of the shutter ...


3

You can use a wired remote release that has a built in intervalometer, such as this fairly inexpensive one or this one. Regardless of the brand name stamped on them, they all seem to be made identically. You then set the camera to Bulb and let the timer in the remote open and close the shutter.


3

You have to limit incoming light even more, since it is daylight. You can achieve this by stacking (putting on) multiple Natural Density filters. You might try to get Cokin or Lee filter holders and buy extra set with couple ND filters and try how many filters you have to use to stop enough light. Those filters comes as ND2, ND4 etc... depending on how much ...


3

Get Magic Lantern. Opens up a whole load of neat stuff including an intervalometer. And it's free!


2

In addition to what dpollitt wrote about using Bulb mode, you may want to consider buying a remote control/shutter release. It looks like the Canon RS-60E3 will work with the EOS 600D, but there are aftermarket variants as well, and you should double-check compatibility to be certain. The specific model number Canon unit will almost certainly be listed in ...


2

It does not. Once in BULB, no automatic exposure parameter applies. Bulb is found in Manual mode on the vast majority of cameras. On most others it is a selectable shutter-speed in Manual mode. When you can select it in another mode, then the camera uses defaults. Actually, on the two cameras I know that accept Bulb in shutter-priority, the exposure time ...


2

Not yet. CHDK (the Canon Hack Development Kit) is working on a port for the SX50, but according to their website, it's in very early alpha right now, so if you don't know your way around the camera yet, you don't want to mess with it. However, it will probably be available eventually. Here is the link to the SX50 on the CHDK website, ...


2

Based on the specifications at Canon's website, the longest exposure your camera is capable of is 15 seconds. Part of the reason for this is the small size of the sensor, and the resulting small pixel pitch needed to squeeze 12.1MP onto it. All of those pixels that close together generate heat, which can in turn increase the amount of electrical noise that ...


2

Generally you should use a remote shutter release to hold the shutter open for a prolonged period. This also prevents camera-shake that is usually associated with touching the camera while taking a long exposure. Several options are available from simple lockable switches to complex intervalometers. Each have their own advantages but to get started a cheap ...


2

If you are using the RC-6 wireless IF remote, the possibility is that its being interrupted when you push it to close the bulb mode, the battery is dying on the remote (not likely if new but possible), or its being pressed for too long to close the shutter and then your camera thinks its time to start a new picture. try setting the camera to single shot and ...


1

Taking a look at page 78 of the manual as far as I can tell your camera does not have any option to extend beyond 8 seconds in camera. I also don't see an option for a remote control or shutter release that would give that ability. You could(and should) stack multiple 8 second exposures in post processing though. Take a look at this existing question: How ...


1

Without actually testing, I am reluctant to say with absolute certainty, but I won't let that stop me -- I will just make a list of assumptions :-) Assuming stacked exposures of the same total time as the single bulb exposure, that your are not using dark frame noise reduction, that sensor power efficiency does not get significantly worse as it heats up and ...


1

To use Bulb mode on your T4i, Select Manual <M> exposure mode and move the shutter speed past 30 seconds to bulb. (pp. 113-114 of the T4i Instruction Manual) The simplest way to shoot fireworks with your Rebel T4i is with a wired remote. The Canon RS60 E3 sells at amazon.com for around $22USD. Generic versions are available for about 1/2 that. The ...


1

Yes, you have to set the mode to M and dial the shutter speed past 30s (it will show 'bulb'). You will want some type of remote trigger for this mode. A canon RC-1,5 or 6 is a cheap and reliable IR based remote (I have used the RC-1 for about 7 years and only change the battery once, after about 5-6 years). You enable the remote by switching to the timer ...


1

As mentioned, you would need to consider using an ND filter. The LEE big stopper is a well respected filter and should give the results you are looking for. Here is a link to the Lee Website The cokin ND filters are known to give a magenta colour cast when used, which, unless you like that effect on a specific image, you would have to fix in post ...


1

This review on the SX50 says that it can use an RS-60E3 remote switch, although it's not clear from the product description that it works on your camera (and it's not listed under compatibility in the Canon store) If your camera doesn't have bulb mode, I don't think that will give you bulb functionality anyway. You would instead need to take multiple ...


1

There is a shutter speed called Bulb Mode that will keep the shutter open while the shutter button is depressed. There is a limit to how long the shutter will be allowed to remain open. It appears that the GH3 at least extends the 120-second bulb-mode time limitation of the GH2: Panasonic's specifications page lists this limit at around 60 minutes. ...


1

As an owner of SX50 HS, I can clarify a few points that the other answers have left dangling. Exposures longer than 1.0 second requires ISO 80 setting. In other words, as soon as you go from 1.0 to 1.3, ISO setting automatically locks down to 80. From this point, you can set the exposure up to 15 seconds. RS-60E3 remote switch is compatible with this ...



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