It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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10

This is pretty easily done with a layer with a simple linear gradient, from black to transparent. Alone, that looks like: (In the above, the background is rendered as white, but in the actual layer it's transparent). Change the opacity up and down to taste — as you can see from the top of the image there not being black, I've put it down to about 15%. ...


7

The first shot is front focussed and looks like it was shot wide open, so a lot of the main part of the image is out of focus, which can result in glowy halos around highlights. However the effect is more extreme than I would expect, so my guess is the front element is dirty/greasy. It also looks quite a bit like spherical aberration to me which would ...


6

When you say "light blue" is lighter than "dark blue" you may be mixing two concepts together without knowing it. In one sense, the colors light blue and dark blue are two different colors - that is, they are a different proportion of the three primary colors. You could also be talking about different brightness levels within the same proportion of color ...


6

The unit of measure for brightness is the lumen. I know it is used to measure the amount of light emmited from a source. But in your question, I think you are talking about the reflection of light off a source. I may be wrong but I think it is also measured in lumens. The presence of black (in your example of dark vs light blue) shows lower lumen units ...


4

Aperture and other programs have a Shadows and Highlights tool that can be used to bring more of the picture into balance exposure-wise. Bringing up the shadows will make the area where the girl is sitting a bit less dark and prevent the brighter areas from drawing the eye. You'll probably have more luck with this if the original image is raw, since ...


4

You can't, you can see why with a simple experiment: Walk into a very well lit room, set the camera to aperture priority (Av) and select reasonable exposure values (for example, f/5.6, ISO 400) also set the camera to capture raw files Turn off all the lights so that the room is fairly dark, take a picture of one of the walls (if you don't have a tripod it ...


2

Looking at an eBay auction description, your Kako 720sd specs out with a guide number of 28-40m (I'm assuming that's across the zoom range of 28-85mm), so chances are that this is a pretty decently-powered speedlight (e.g., in the neighborhood of 30m when zoomed to 35mm), in the range of most of the hotshoe flashes you're going to find. Going to a new ...


2

This is physically impossible. Without active amplification, the luminance of the image can not be more than the luminance of the subject. Otherwise you would be violating the second law of thermodynamics. If you try to focus the sun rays on a black body, it can get really hot, but not hotter than the surface of the sun itself. For a mathematical proof, read ...


2

I am unfamiliar with Aperture, but you could use any program that emulates a graduated filter, e.g. Adobe Lightroom. Check out this link part "2. Reducing atmospheric haze". Basically what this does is: applies a gradient on the photo in the direction and strength of your choosing, so you can darken the top and gradually decrease the strength of darkening ...


2

When you have a relatively dark subject and a very bright background you are not going to be able to capture both in a single frame, so your options are: Decide you really wanted to get a silhouette or white background Sometimes you just have to make due with what you have Combine several frames Shoot several frames at different exposures and combine ...


1

You can try this: http://www.granitebaysoftware.com/products/productgbd.aspx It claims to do what you need (Although I have no experience with it) by normalising a sequence as either an Adobe plugin (Premiere or After Effects) or as a standalone application.


1

The lens your are using and how clean it is are heavily contributing, but the basic answer is how wide open you are shooting, the increased angle is allowing heavy light scatter present in the shooting environment to blur highlights.


1

Instead of applying a block grad filter in post processing, you could: Photoshop: Create new layer. Change blend mode to overlay. Select a soft black brush at 10% opacity. Paint into desired areas. In Lightroom: Select a new adjustment brush. Decrease exposure, increase contrast, etc. Paint desired areas.


1

In Gimp or in Photoshop: -use the Lasso tool. Yes, it's a bit more meticulous, but if it's just for one photo, it's not too much effort, and I think it's worth it. Select the area that you want and connect the points. It will take about 2-3 minutes. -After you made the selection, go to Colors>Curves. If you've never worked with curves before, in this ...


1

Increase the exposure via a slower shutter speed, wider aperture, or a higher ISO... Exposure compensation will also do it in basically any mode, set it to over expose the image. You could also lighten the subject in post processing although that typically isn't preferred unless it is your only option.


1

In general, most camera LCDs are much higher contrast and much higher saturation than a general purpose computer monitor. They are tweaked this way because it makes the images look more vibrant on a small and low resolution display, but without more careful adjustment, they would look very artificial on a larger, higher resolution display at the same ...


1

Short answer, yes. High Dynamic Range (HDR) is used when the scene luminance range is larger than the range your sensor can capture. Say your camera can deal with 10 stops of lighting range, and your scene has a difference of 12 stops between shadows and highlights, if you take a shot you will either have the highlights blow out, or shadows block up. ...


1

Yes. HDR techniques are perfectly able to capture a dark subject on a bright background. You just need enough images at different exposure so you have properly exposed images of both the subject, the background and everything in between.


1

Set the Nikon D5100 from its default Matrix Metering to Spot Metering. This will allow the camera to meter the centre 3.5mm of your viewfinder and correctly expose for this area whilst leaving the background over exposed with some blown out highlights. Next, set the camera to RAW and click away (very important for post work). you can leave as jpeg if you ...



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