Incense

by Bart Arondson

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22

Increasing the Brightness tries to preserve the highlights while increasing Exposure will scale everything. This image demonstrates it nicely: source: http://lightroomkillertips.com/2010/lightroom-exposure-vs-brightness/


21

Exposure has a stronger effect on the highlights. Brightness has a stronger effect on the midtones. To quote from the Lightroom user manual: Exposure Sets the overall image brightness, with a greater effect in the high values. ... Brightness Adjusts image brightness, mainly affecting midtones. ... Set the overall tonal scale by setting ...


19

The type of lighting, the way the subject reflects light, presence of haze, the lens design and coatings and the dyes used in the sensor all have an influence on the vividness of colours in an image. But the major factor, which outweighs all of these by a significant margin, is how the image is processed. Either in camera or on a PC the saturation settings ...


13

The LCD brightness is in no way related to the photographs taken by your camera. It's usually just a way of saving some battery power as well as being able to bring down the brightness in dark locations. However, it may cause you to think your photo is unexposed when it potentially isn't, if used on a low brightness setting. In this case, it's better to ...


10

In the photo you put in the question, note how the foreground is extremely underexposed. This is because the exposure metering was made relative to the snow. However, if you set the snow to the standard exposure, you will get a "dark", gray snow. You need to add about 2 stops with Exposure Compensation (or use manual mode) in order to get a bright white ...


9

Contrary to popular belief, extremely bright light often desaturates colors a bit. In theory, the brightness isn't what matters, but directionality does, and extremely bright light also tends to be directional. As a rule, you'll get brighter, more intense colors under a cloudy sky than under a clear sky. There are (at least) two major reasons for this. The ...


9

I used to use Hugin which is open source project. It is able to find correct exposure for most cases, even if You weren't exposing separate shots in the same way. F.ex. here I have made some basic RAW->TIFF processing and put it into hugin:


9

The exposure control stretches the histogram in a linear way, so it will affect the brightest colors the most. The brightness control affects the middle range more, so that you can make an image brighter without affecting the brightest colors too much. In the image where you increased the exposure, you see that the light blue color is brighter. In the ...


7

LCD brightness affects your perception of the photo, not the photo. At worst, a poorly adjusted LCD will cause you to make bad settings decisions. Make your decisions based on data in the histogram to avoid such errors. The goal when adjusting brightness is that white areas emit as much light as a white object would reflect. This means the LCD should be ...


7

Things look different because everything is different and you have done no effort to make them the same. Your DSLR has control over brightness and so does your screen and your friend's, etc. The probability of them being at the same brightness without you doing explicitly so is absolutely zero. A JPEG image and RAW file is different. As a matter, a RAW ...


7

What you are probably looking for is a 10-stop ND filter. Lee and Hitech make large square filters - Lee calls theirs the "big stopper". B+W make a screw-in version that is less expensive. These will roughly allow for 1000 times the exposure. So instead of 1/250th of a second, you can expose for 1000 * 1/250 = 4 seconds. If you want even longer ...


6

It sounds as if the internal light-lowering mechanism in the camera has failed. In a larger camera, this is the aperture, but in many point and shoots, using an aperture to reduce the amount of light will only increase diffraction in the extremely short focal lengths of these cameras. So it's instead a series of neutral-density (ND) filters. The fact that ...


6

You need to shoot at either sunrise or set (sunset is generally warmer in tone), when the sun is very low in the sky. Shoot with the sun behind the model (taking care not to look directly at it if possible). As you are shooting into the sun, you need some light source to light the front of your model: this could either be a diffused flash or a reflector. As ...


6

The unit of measure for brightness is the lumen. I know it is used to measure the amount of light emmited from a source. But in your question, I think you are talking about the reflection of light off a source. I may be wrong but I think it is also measured in lumens. The presence of black (in your example of dark vs light blue) shows lower lumen units ...


6

When you say "light blue" is lighter than "dark blue" you may be mixing two concepts together without knowing it. In one sense, the colors light blue and dark blue are two different colors - that is, they are a different proportion of the three primary colors. You could also be talking about different brightness levels within the same proportion of color ...


5

You are missing the point of manual mode. Unlike the automatic or semi-automatic modes, it is up to you to change the settings to get the exposure you want in any given scene. That's why it's called manual mode. The light varies, therefore so will the camera settings. It is impossible to permanently 'set the cursor to 0' unless you live in a windowless box ...


5

Polarizers are a good start if you want to achieve a blue sky, but they can be difficult or impossible to use with a wide angle lens due to the angle to the sun that will change across the image. I still would recommend one to any photographer. A graduated neutral density filter may be the best investment. It will allow you to lower the contrast in that ...


5

Well, sort of. Think about the sun shining through a lens — it's immediately apparent that the focused spot of light is brighter than the unfocused. However, the catch is that your "real view" also goes through a lens which focuses the light: your eye. So, in a sense, the real comparison is simply "Is there a lens which is brighter than the human eye?" — ...


5

Theoretically both images should be the same brightness, even though the NEX sensor is larger, it stills receives same amount of light per unit area both lenses were set to f/3.5. The difference in brightness is due to different processing, there's nothing in the ISO standard that guarantee the same digital brightness values given the same exposure and ISO ...


5

It is not. What you are referring to is sensitivity to light. That is the ISO sensitivity is for and while there is a standard that describes it, digital sensors do not match exactly the posted sensitivity. A site like DxOMark actually measures ISO equivalence as part of its sensor benchmarks and you can commonly see a difference of ±1/3 EVs. The other ...


4

What you can use is layer mask. Basically, you create a copy of the layer, use Threshold tool (or curves or whatever you want) to make the copy white when you want top level to be visible and black when you want iot to be transparent, and then use that as mask for the top layer.


4

I'd suggest you look at using exposure compensation. If your pictures are too bright, then go ahead and use the flash, but turn the exposure compensation down (-.5 or -2/3 for a start). This tells the camera you think it's too bright and it will adjust down. You can get very dull colors if the light is too low, or if the flash is too bright and washes ...


4

First tip : make your flash more diffuse. For this, you can put a half ping pong ball in front of it with some tape. Yes, it will lead in a special looking, but could drastically improve your pictures. Second tip : redirect you flash to the ceiling. For this you will need to adapt a little mirror that will redirect the flash light up. This is the best way ...


4

Yes it's very doable. I do that pretty often to create fake HDR from the same photo at two different exposures. There are many ways to achieve this, it depends on how proficient you are with the selection tools and layer masks. I'm confident you can do it. First, put your two photos in the same file, on different layers and create a layer mask in the top ...


4

A back-of-camera LCD is not designed, and should not be used, for gauging exposure based on the brightness of the LCD. As noted by Dreamager in a comment, you can adjust the brightness of the LCD and that might better approximate how things look on your computer. Whether or not your computer is displaying an image accurately depends on if it's been ...


4

The most likely reason is the relative brightness of your camera LCD and your computer screen. I wouldn't judge if the image is bright just because it looks bright in the LCD. I would instead use the histogram - start by taking a well-exposed image where you have a histogram that indicates the image is not too dark and not too bright. I would turn off ...


4

You need an ND filter to get long exposures in daylight as others have noted. However this will probably still not give you the results you need. Long exposure shots of cars work at night time because the car head/tail lights are brighter than anything else in the scene. During the day all you will get with a long exposure shot of cars going by is a muddy ...


3

David, you have opened a glorious can of worms. The technique you are describing is old school, can be done and sometimes is the best way to do it. However, PS has some pretty cool features under automate. Go to FILE -> AUTOMATE -> MERGE TO HDR. You'll select the two images and let photoshop run. This is one way to do it. You can also use software like ...



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