Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

A good bridge camera is one that allows for the user to grow and stretch into a deeper understanding of their craft. It should have the functionality to control light through ISO, aperture and shutter speed. It should have instant shutter release (you push the button and it goes!) and a hot shoe (for flash). I suggest a hot shoe because built in pop-up ...


7

My first recommendation is that you familiarize with the basic photography concepts, starting with the exposure triangle. All cameras are based on these principles, so it is important to understand them, even for the cameras like yours that don't let you set some of these settings. Understanding the above will make you realize that calling your camera ...


6

It's important to realize that "bridge camera" is not a technical term. It's a marketing term *, made up to sell more-expensive cameras to intermediate photographers who are beyond point and shoots but are intimidated by the cost or complexity of a SLR. Generally, the things sold as bridge cameras are bulky point and shoots which kind of look like they ...


5

There are both similarities and differences in terms of the optics between binoculars and using the longer focal lengths of a Superzoom camera to view distant objects. First, let's look at the similarities: Focal Length. Both the binoculars and the camera use optics to enlarge distant objects. If a binocular has a magnification factor of 10x, that would ...


5

Having a non-interchangeable lens in an SLResque body with a compact-camera image sensor is pretty much the definition of a bridge camera, so I think you are out of luck :) You might want to look into the four-thirds system instead or one of the other mirrorless jobs, but 250 Euro isn't enough to get into it I think.


5

The main thing about a Bridge camera is that it's "Bridging" the gap between a small point & shoot camera, and a larger DSLR. So the comparison of a bridge camera to a DSLR comes down, basically, to the following:- A larger optical zoom lens like a DSLR. Versatile, but not interchangeable. The sensor is generally not as advanced as a dedicated DSLR, ...


4

Camera optics and binocular optics are inherently different things. The x multiplier on a super zoom is effectively meaningless as it depends on what the shorter focal length is. A 2mm to 10mm lens is a 5x zoom, but it isn't particularly impressive. A 200mm to 1000mm lens on the other hand is also only a 5x zoom, but would be one crazy amount of zoom. ...


4

The first one isn't a setting/exposure issue as there are stripes/lines across the picture. From my technical experience, I'm willing to bet it's a faulty image sensor. If you Google images "faulty ccd", you can see very similar results. This fault isn't necessarily caused by damage to the camera but just simply due to the image sensor failing. Although I ...


3

Maybe. One of the problems with this comparison is that "DSLR" really covers a ginormous range of equipment. I just saw a refurbed Canon T3 with kit lens offered on sale for $300. Can a (good) bridge camera perform as well as that? In a lot of cases, yes. Many bridge cameras have (reasonably) fast lenses and great reach -- both important in sports ...


3

First, you'll have to consider what the main uses of binoculars are: marine military/hunting astronomical theatre In these settings (except theatre, where binoculars tend to be smaller and cheaper), there are several important disadvantages for super-zoom cameras when compared to binoculars: they're generally not as weather resistant nor rugged as ...


3

The reason the lens in bridge cameras have massive zoom and still cheaper is because it is small compared to a DSLR lens.The main reason behind this is the sensor size(i.e. crop factor)The sensor size is a sensor of 6x crop factor. That implies that the image in the P&S sensor is cropped 6 times the image in Full frame sensor. This also can be said as ...


3

The HS30 EXR has a very smooth zoom and the HS25 EXR with which it shares the lens should be identical. If there is resistance I can only assume some stuff got into the mechanism. I also have an X-S1 which has a tighter zoom because it is weather sealed but I still would call it smooth and shows little resistance. On all these cameras the zoom can be ...


3

The traditional bridge camera is the ultra-zoom as you have been looking at. However, there are now more compact models with advanced photographic controls that work even better (Well, they did exist for a while but until recently there were not much choice). The trade-off is the more compact models actually use bigger sensors. This makes their image ...


3

Shoot pictures, and then shoot pictures, and after a while try to read, or re-read, the manual for your camera cover to cover. If the reading is too terse, buy a book that explains how to get the most out of your specific camera model. ("Magic lantern guides" for instance ... I haven't read any of these books... yet. But that's not the point). THe point ...


2

You can search for tips for using compact camera on the internet, but IMO the best way to understand what your camera is capable of and to find personalized tutorials, is to look for images taken by your camera and maybe ask their photographers about their techniques, for a start check Nikon Coolpix L120 on Flickr.


2

I'm an estate agent and use a Nikon P500 bridge camera. It has a 22.5mm lens and I love it as I can add daylight etc. It cost me around £300 and it has been replaced by the P510 (not the same wide angle lens) but it's not been out for too long so you should be able to get a second hand one very cheaply.


2

I'm sorry to say but I think that with the budget constraint given you won't be able to find a camera that provides what you want. To get those 'estate agent' shots that make a gloomy flat look like as spacious as a well lit warehouse you really neeed a specialised wide angle set up. I've only seen it done well with full frame DSLRs and very wide lenses. ...


2

Another option might be to use any camera you want, take numerous pictures of the room, and finally stitch them together with a panorama stitching tool such as the open source (free) Hugin. That way you don't need a super wide angle lens! I do this all the time. I'll try to find a good example and post it up tonight when I get home. Update Here is an ...


2

You can buy after market "wide angle adapters" which fit on the filter threads of many cameras. Some camera manufacturers offer these for their own cameras. While the quality is seldom stunningly good, one of these may very well be good enough for your purpose. Here's a few examples: Examples of claimed high quality versions for a range of camera brands ...


2

24mm is ultra-wide but you are right, there are now a few cameras with 22.xmm lens which is slightly wider. You also want to use an add-on flash, so what you are looking for is a ultra-wide-angle camera with a hot-shoe. As you can see from the search link, there are 12 such models, you will have to see which one fits your budget. The Fuji X-S1 is probably ...


2

It depends on how you define the term. Generally, no. "Bridge cameras" are a category that "bridges the gap" between point and shoot cameras and something better — where "something better" is usually understood to be a DSLR, and the idea that it's a "bridge" usually implies that it has advanced features and manual control — but it also might mean that it's ...


2

There is already an answer covering technical aspects, however, I want to (at least try) to focus on the other side of photography: The artistic one. Composition. My sugestion on the excercise is to take several pictures of the same subject, placing it in different points of the frame. (I recommend to forget about the pictures for a while, a couple of days ...


2

From Wikipedia: Bridge cameras are cameras which fill the niche between the single-lens reflex cameras (SLRs) and the point-and-shoot camera. They are often comparable in size and weight to the smallest digital SLRs (DSLR), but almost all digital bridge cameras lack an optical viewfinder system (film bridges generally had a lighter version of a reflex ...


1

If you can get minimal depth of field (what you're referring to as 'bokeh effect'), then almost certainly the camera's AF system isn't capable of focusing fast enough on a moving player to achieve that effect while still having good focus. Many DSLRs even struggle with that. However, its unlikely given the size of the sensor and relatively slow aperture ...


1

Bridge Camera combines the concepts, and just the concetps of the DSLR and Point&Shoots Camera. The simplicity of the P&S operations combined with the some technical concept of DSLR, that is what we called a Bridge Camera. This makes them ideal for photographers who like the simplicity of a compact camera, although occasionally find it rather ...


1

It's all about the lens. Looking at the cameras which are called a bridge camera, the first thing you will notice is the big honking lens on the thing, I think the rest of the features can be compared with point and shoots but not this one. That's its most distinguishing feature whether or not it makes it compare to an SLR is a matter of opinion.


1

I actually had to do a quick google on "bridge camera" - but I'd say the differences are rather obvious: Bridge Camera = high end point and shoot better optics than a compact camera larger sensor than a compact camera DSLR: bigger sensor exchangeable lenses (key) optical viewfinder where you look through the lens (via a mirror -> SLR = Single Lens ...


1

I'm not going to compete with the experts already answering here, but I wondered why you thought your brother was not such an expert as to buy a DSLR? You don't HAVE to ever change the lens, and entry-level DSLRs all have 'easy to use" modes that are essentially the same as the compacts from the same manufacturers. Using a DSLR isn't much harder than a ...


1

I've got a Panasonic FZ28, and I learned a ton from that camera. The feature list Rob put together is about right, though both the FZ38 and the P100 lack a hot shoe. Using that camera, I was able to learn about the exposure triangle, quality trade-offs of different ISO settings, RAW processing, stop-action techniques, and so on -- just the sort of thing ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible