Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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54

The manual that came with your camera.


24

I'd agree with Peterson (e.g. Understanding Exposure). One I've found very useful is Michael Freeman's The Photographer's Eye - some excellent stuff about the composition of photos, with plenty of good examples, and very helpful diagrams.


22

One of the best books I can recommend is Michael Freeman's famous book: The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos This book is a rare gem, in that it does a pretty superb job of covering all the critical artistic topics of photography in a generally agnostic way. Michael Freeman is a talented photographer, and his ...


16

I have to say that the Scott Kelby book "The Digital Photography Book: The Step-by-step Secrets for How to Make Your Photos Look Like the Pros" was a digestible and easy page turner which is small enough for a beginner to lug around whilst still referring to situation specific shot suggestions. A little tongue in cheek in tone in places, but I found it ...


15

Understanding Exposure is great for helping understand the ins and outs of cameras. The Photographer's Eye is a good book about creating strong design elements in your photographs. Not a book, but Cambridge in Colour's tutorials are great at helping you understand the technical aspects.


11

Have a look at "The Photographer's Eye". I found it superb and contains all the rules you can think of. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Photographers-Eye-Composition-Design-Digital/dp/1905814046/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1292253318&sr=1-1


10

I found Light: Science and Magic: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting really good book for photographers. After all photography is nothing but managing light. The chapters mostly use artificial lighting, but it is the concept building of why a particular setting was used makes the book informative.


9

I'd highly recommend Scott Kelby's Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3 Book for Digital Photographers Scott really knows his stuff and is a great author.


8

Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is a great and easy to read book that covers these topics.


8

There are several methods for publishing such a book, which I'll mention below. Note that there is an excellent Wikipedia article that explains more. I should add, be very cautious with these services. You can make a real profit, but they can also just be a drain on resources, and keep you out of traditional publishing. You might try contacting some of them, ...


8

The book I would recommend: Plate to Pixel. Everything you need right there and it was written by a friend of mine. It is by far the most complete and most comprehensive "how-to" book out there. Better than any blog (my own included).


8

What it sounds like you are looking for is album design software. This is really where someone with a background in wedding photography can lend a hand. It has been a tradition you could say to order a wedding album for yourselves as the bride and groom, and also to order "parent albums" that they can display proudly of the event. There are many different ...


8

I think the Scott Kelby Digital Photography Book series fits the bill here. These aren't books that I really enjoy or appreciate myself as technical person, but I know they are technically accurate, and they intentionally aim for an approachable, non-technical style. The "elevator pitch" for the series is: If you and I were out on a shoot, and you asked ...


7

Scott Kelby's "Digital Photography" A great book to really improve your photography is Scott Kelby's Digital Photography. It's a hints and tips book, not a thorough working through of the principals, but I came away from it with a lot of really good solid practical things which I now include in my photography, so I'm sure it would be helpful.


7

Books by Henry Horenstein are very technical, but are unfortunately more to do with film photography. Thom Hogan (bythom.com) writes a lot of technical information about sensors. Well technical to most people, not a lot of equations. He references the book Manual of Photography by Ralph Jacobson - "the highly technical and math-filled volume that defines ...


7

The answer is simply: no. Light is a known, measurable quantity, measurable, photons bouncing and hitting film, sensors and eyeballs. You can teach light. You can explain how placing lights in certain positions will give you a certain effect, you generalize as to how most people interpret that light (soft = beauty, harsh = ruggedness, etc). You can talk ...


6

These are some quite advanced texts covering the artistic and cultural side of photography: Batchen, G (2000) Over Exposed. London: The New Press Berger, J. (1972). Ways of seeing. London: Pelican Brittain, D. (ed.) (1999) Creative Camera: 30 Years of Writing. Manchester: MUP Burgin, V (1982) Thinking Photography. Macmillan Press (see Benjamin ‘The Author ...


6

Having an art school background means that I've had to sit through any number (dozens, probably) of Art History classes... Some of the big 'principles' that come out of art history include: A strong sense of that which has come before. So many photographers approach photography in a vacuum... Having no idea (and often not caring) that art is built on the ...


6

Here would be my topics How to Hold a Digital Camera How to buy the right equipment for you Composure - Some basic rules and how to break them Shutter/Aperture settings - How they affect your shot Depth of field Lighting and Exposure How to use flash What is ISO? How to pre-focus and use auto focus effectively An introduction to White Balance Lenses and ...


6

One approach would be to look at the top questions on this site, and to make sure those things are addressed in a helpful and organized way. You could even reuse the content from here, since all user contributions are licensed under the sharing-friendly Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. Translation into local languages is very much a part of ...


5

A few book recommendations: Photography and the Art of Seeing by Freeman Patterson Tao of Photography: Seeing Beyond Seeing by Philippe Gross Within the Frame: the Journey of Photographic Vision by David duChemin


5

You may also want to try the "5 Photo Composition Hints" series of web articles from ShotAddict.com: The First Element - Texture The Second Element - Color The Third Element - Subject The Fourth Element - Space The Fifth Element - Light


5

The one that helped me the most and that I read the most times is The National Geographic Photography Field Guide. Unlike most modern books it is about photography itself, not manipulating images. It also puts talks about techniques in context for different subjects.


5

Ah, you may be barking up the wrong tree when it comes to understanding composition and images as, after all, there are visual arts that were here long before photography ever was such as: painting. Ignore the title in that link, it's not what it seems, and the principles of composition for painting equally apply to photography, which is also true of ...


5

A course in art history is great the same way reading Shakespeare and the Bible is great when you decided to delve into literature: it gives you a foundation on which to base your understanding of modern photography, since so much of what we do now references what has already been done. You also learn about a rich language of symbology, about emotional ...


5

http://lulu.com are popular for this sort of thing as they also handle selling and distribution of your books (though you have to pay for the print run upfront).


5

the book Light: Science and Magic: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting 3rd Ed by Fil Hunter, Steven Biver, Paul Fuqua does specifically focus on the "lighting" aspect of studio photography but it it is well researched and gives you a clear description of the optics and physics involved - check it out it may fill a few gaps in the information you seek. ...


5

There are couple of them, but you can start with these: Optics in Photography (SPIE Press Monograph Vol. PM06): Explains fundamental optical principles that apply to photography, cameras, and lenses. Intended for professionals and serious amateur photographers as well as lens designers and optical engineers. Contents Perspective Light Rays and Lens ...


5

While not a collection of exercises, I would suggest the title "Light: Science and Magic" by Fil Hunter, Paul Fuqua, and Steven Biver. It's a classic book that discusses how light moves around a scene to better understand difficult lighting challenges. There are several examples to follow if you want to recreate for your own education. Your local library ...



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