Serene Life

by garik

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85

Most importantly: It's not just the disks rendered from a point source, even though that's the simplest way to describe it and see it. The disk is just a shorthand; the lens characteristics that produce these disks are always present; they're what determines the look of the out-of-focus areas in every photo you take! On the one hand, it's quite ...


41

Here's the list of things that influence depth of field the most (in this particular order): Subject distance, the closer the subject is, the shallower the DOF (think of macro) Focal length, the more millimeters, the shallower the DOF Aperture, the smaller the f-number, the shallower the DOF


36

I think the best way to describe Bokeh is to show Bokeh: Reference: In the Spotlight by Healzo The blurry background "circles" are what we normally refer to as Bokeh, however in general it more simply refers to the quality of background blur. The picture above has some truly excellent bokeh, as the circles are truly round, generally evenly shaded across ...


36

Bokeh is specifically the out-of-focus areas of an image. Gaussian blur is an algorithm to fog selected image areas, to hide details or make them look out of focus. The main differences: bokeh is created optically, gaussian blur in post-production; in bokeh, the amount of how wide an out-of-focus point will be smeared is determined by its relative ...


26

Depth of field depends not only on aperture but also on distance to the subject. Depth of field increases as the subject gets farther away. If the wave and boats were all relatively far from the camera, but not terribly far from each other, then it's not surprising that they were all reasonably sharp. You can use DOFMaster to run the numbers yourself. Some ...


25

It's probably a combination of two factors, firstly as you rightly suggest the focus screen plays a role - the view you see in the viewfinder effectively passes through a second aperture and so appears to be stopped down to about f/2.4 - f/2.8 So you can see bokeh through the viewfinder, it will just be much less pronounced due to the smaller effective ...


24

There's a good answer from Brian Auer, which I'll reproduce here, as it pretty much covers the problem you're trying to solve: Ooh, good question. Yes, but how much will depend on the camera. If the camera has manual controls for aperture, that definitely helps. It also helps if the camera has zoom, as most P&S cameras do. The problem with ...


24

Bokeh, in its most technical definition, is the shape produced by taking an out of focus picture of a single point of light. The overlapping bokeh from all the myriad points of light that make up a scene creates the blur in out-of-focus areas. People may have different preferences, but there are really just a few different measurable qualities of bokeh. ...


23

The definitive answer for the word in English is Mike Johnston's article on the topic at Luminous Landscape. Mike says "it is properly pronounced with bo as in bone and ke as in Kenneth, with equal stress on either syllable." He's the person responsible for the h on the end in English — he thought it would ward off the most egregious mispronunciation, ...


19

No. The sensor size plays a major part in bokeh. Sensor dimensions of your dSLR are about 3 times bigger than sensor of the compact, so a photo taken with compact's 5.1mm f/2 will look similar to one taken at 16mm f/6.3 using APS-C sensor. Also, the shorter focal length will reduce bokeh effect, because wider angle of view means more background has to fit ...


18

Just cut a hole in a piece of paper, and tape it over a wide-aperture lens? See, for instance, this link and this link.


18

Ultimately, you want a shallow depth of field, which means a low fstop number (f/2.8 for example). The lower the fstop number, the more light that gets in, so in order to expose correctly, you need to increase your shutter speed (1/1000 is better than 1/25), lower your iso (100 is better than 400), and if all this is not enough, add a neutral density filter ...


18

Yes you are looking at clipping by the mirror box, I'm afraid it's unavoidable when using a lens with large aperture and exit pupil close to the film plane at certain focusing distance. Even if the mirror box doesn't clip the light cone the lens barrel will (for off axis points of light) leading to cat eye bokeh. Here's an example from a full frame camera ...


17

Bokeh is subjective, and all cameras can create bokeh. One pre-requisite to pleasing bokeh is to have sufficiently out of focus areas. Most details that are only a bit out of focus don't look too pleasing. Something is more out of focus the further away it is from the plane of focus. In addition, the the shallower the depth of field, the quicker things ...


17

While using shallow depth of field is the most common technique to get blurred background, there are some other ways: using plain background so it would not need any blurring set up your own background - you'll have full control over color and pattern shoot against sky or some other plain surface (longer lens will help you by having smaller segment of ...


17

The Japanese word Boke (ボケ) or the American spelling Bokeh, refers to the out of focus areas of a photograph. It does not necessarily mean only the background blur, it refers to foreground blur as well. Bokeh is often used to refer to the quality of out of focus blur more so than its presence. In Japanese, Boke Aji (ボケ味) is used to specifically refer to the ...


16

The areas which are out of focus are blurred in a shape matching that of the lens opening. The final shape is usually circular when shooting wide open, but when stopped down, the aperture blades modify the shape, for instance, with 6 blades, the bokeh would probably be hexagonal. One example of circular bokeh: To really show this effect, you can use a ...


15

The bokeh behind the couple looks normal, the sides seem to have had a gaussian blur applied to give a fake tilt shift effect. The telling factor is the highlights. The light coming from the windows is much brighter and ought to have a sharp cutoff when rendered out of focus. Gaussian blur gives a soft edge to such highlights. edit: reading the text of the ...


15

You don't actually need a tilt-shift lens to do this. This particular image was taken with a standard lens (50mm f1.2 according to the filename of the image on Ryan's website) rather than with a tilt-shift. The extreme bokeh effect here was achieved by using a freelensing technique, where the lens is detached from the camera body and held at a tilted angle ...


14

Bokeh is a bit like evaluating wine, there's some technical evaluation and some subjective evaluation of it. From the purely subjective, it's going to be whether or not it pleases you and the viewer, and that's a subtle thing to many. The success of the bokeh will depend on how well the subject pops from the background and whether or not you even really see ...


14

The good people at Zeiss managed to write an excellent paper of no less than 45 pages on the topic. (granted, it talks about DoF too)


14

TL;DR version: Teleconverters don't affect depth of field at any given distance. They literally transform your 300 f/2.8 lens into a 600 f/5.6 lens. Any 600 f/5.6 lens, teleconverted or not, will have the same depth of field as a 300 f/2.8 lens. There's a lot of confusion about the relationship between depth of field, aperture, f-stop, and focal length. In ...


14

It's complicated but I'll have a go at explaining it. Light from a single point spreads out in all directions and hits the entire front surface of the lens, this light gets focused back down onto a tiny dot by the lens if the lens is focussed at the distance of the point. If not (i.e. the point is part of the background) the light lands on the sensor in a ...


14

It's not appropriate to use the term "Gaussian blur" for the out-of-focus parts of an image, because "Gaussian" refers to a specific blurring function. It's the same Gaussian curve that you may know from the "normal distribution" or "bell curve" in statistics. A bright point that's smoothed by a Gaussian will taper smoothly from a bright center to a dark ...


14

It is a property of the lens. the bokeh highlights image not only shape of the aperture, but it also gets a profile. It can be a square profile, have sharp edge and then attenuate, have dots inside it, show cats eye, or be smooth like yours. The way the lens is corrected for spherical aberrations affect this. Vintage lenses typically make sharp bokeh rings. ...


12

It's more complicated than just depth of field. You can have two photos with identical depth of field, but one can have more background blur than the other. In addition to background blur, there is also "bokeh", which describes what kind of blur there is. Check out this article which describes it in detail, and gives you a tool for calculating the various ...


12

The problem with the prime 35mm is that in order to frame your shot properly, you'll need good mobility. Which you may not always have in a busy and crowded car show. So I would give one point to the 18-200 for that: It'll let you frame your shots even if you can't get yourself at the exact right position you'd need with the 35. Then, the thing is: it's a ...


10

Obviously, smaller f-stop means shorter depth-of-field, so I'm not going there. There are a couple of things you can do: 1) Remove the subject from the background as much as possible. How much will depend on the lens and aperture you can use. 2) Use a longer lens. Longer lenses have more narrow DoF. Hope that helps.



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