Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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1

MirekE is spot on -- Try to adjust exposure to allow a minimum of 90 seconds developing time. Your stop bath will work OK -- best for simplicity to switch to 15ml of ordinary vinegar per liter. Extend your fix time to 4 minutes. Do test a strip of unexposed paper. If you are working via a safelight, place a strip of paper emulsion up in your work area. ...


3

If you remove the paper from the developer after 20 seconds, the clouding could be caused by uneven development. Look at the recommended development time for the paper and the developer and adjust exposure accordingly.


0

I did darkroom photography for 25 years and I like the digital black and white prints that I produce today with Epson K3 better than anything I ever produced in the darkroom. Dmax and the overall perception depend on the paper. Have your lab to print some samples on Canson papers. Glossier papers will give richer blacks, if this is what you want. some matte ...


3

Ok. This can get to be a very deep topic. But before I tell you what I do, there is a yahoo group called digitalblackandwhitetheprint@yahoogroups.com that you should join, and you also should read a fellow named Paul Roark's website, specifically the page http://www.paulroark.com/BW-Info/. What I do is fairly simple, but the results I get are quite good. I ...


0

I work exclusively in black and white. I have used Photoshop, but currently use Photoline. It doesn't really matter which you use, but I've found the channel mixer approach to be difficult to control, and the desaturate method to have no control at all. Both Photoshop and Photoline have a Black and White adjustment layer where you can adjust the values of 8 ...


3

During exposure light travels through emulsion, bounces back from the backing layer and exposes the emulsion again, this time with blurred light, adding halos to the image. This reflection can be prevented by adding opaque dark layer behind the emulsion. Due to the nature of b&w films, the layer is made of soluble dye. Most of the dye is removed ...


3

Each manufacturer uses a slightly different film base. Ilfords is slightly purple, Kodak's slightly cyan on some and Agfa had a slight green cast. This changes by film type as well within a brand. The color can impact the print if you use Variable Contrast paper. Fixing isn't usually a problem related to film base color. Kodak's Tech Pan was the most ...


4

Early photo materials were not very sensitive to light. Additionally bright objects often imaged as a blurred splotch. This imperfection is called a halation. The solution is various colored dyes applied during manufacture. Dying light sensitive silver salt crystals changes their sensitivity and adjusts how they react to different colors. The problem of the ...


14

Its been a very long time, but I believe this is caused by inadequate rinsing of the negative during processing. The film has a coating to reduce light reflecting from the film backing itself. It is usually rinsed away, but seeing a slight purple tinge on negatives is likely very familiar to those who have developed their own B&W film. The coating is ...


6

The color of a B&W negative is irrelevant unless you're using color print paper. If you have true B&W paper, then all that it cares about is the relative irradiance. You could print with any color negative and get a B&W image. If your print is what appears to be tinted, then either the paper is not what you think it is (e.g., there are styles ...



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