Serene Life

by garik

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29

One of the easiest choices is to buy brand name batteries. From batch to batch the manufacturer takes quality and performance very seriously. You know and I know that in general there will be no lemons. Generic batteries can be made by any number of manufacturers and they all take on the challenge with different perspectives. And as a result if you were to ...


28

1. Use high-quality NiMH cells You want the NiMH chemistry because it's able to supply the high peak current that leads to faster recycle times (and less energy lost to internal resistance). "Hold their charge when not in use" and "long lasting (on a single charge)" are opposing criteria: the reason is that the newer low-self-discharge (or "hybrid") cells ...


26

Leaving the batteries in your camera for a week or two between uses will be no problem. If you plan to leave your camera unused for six months to a year, you might want to take them out. And, the lithium battery pack used in your camera (like most current dSLRs) should hold its charge on the shelf fairly well, so you won't have to worry too much about it ...


21

I agree Sanyo Eneloop are very good batteries, but you should also consider getting a high quality charger if you want your batteries to last a while. I took the recommendation from this Coding Horror blog post and went for the BC900, but the newer BL700 is highly recommended as well (comparison here).


17

Although only the manufacturers themselves know for sure and there could be different reasons from one manufacturer to the next there are two obvious possibilities that receive most of the attention from the users of cameras and their proprietary batteries. Profit. Limiting the amount of competition in the marketplace by not using standard, off the shelf ...


14

NimH battery care and feeding has occupied too much of my life in recent years. :-) It is significantly better for NimH batteries NOT to discharge them fully before recharging them. NimH life can be enhanced substantially by never discharging them fully on any occasion. Even when using multiple sets during a day's shooting, if you can manage to leave the ...


13

Amazon has the LP-E5 for $39.99 USD. To me, after buying a $500+ camera, a $40 second battery is a no brainer. I still have the original BP-511a that I purchased for $70 from Canon for my 20D in 2005 (it's now in my 40D), and I purchased a second LP-E6 for $79 for my 5D Mark II. In nearly 5 years of shooting, I've spent a total of $149 for camera ...


13

Based on the reading of the battery spec, no. The battery pack supplies 7.4v, while USB can only supply 5v. However, you can buy the ACK-E2 wall power kit to power the camera directly from a standard outlet.


13

This will not be a problem. Milliamp-hours are a rating of the capacity of the battery (metaphorically, the size of the gas tank), and having extra won't cause any harm. (Basically, it's how long the power will last, not how strong it is.) It's possible but unlikely that cost-cutting in the battery may have other, more problematic issues, but many people use ...


12

I (and many others, from what I've ready), really love the Eneloop batteries by Sanyo. That's an Amazon link to an 8-pack but they're available elsewhere as well. I've had great results as far as the batteries remaining charged, recharging quickly, and offering good performance for things like flash cycle time.


12

Not only do you need new batteries, but what you want is low self-discharge NiMHs. Like the name says, they have a better not-in-use retention of charge, reducing frustrations like this. They generally have lower capacity than "regular" NiMHs, but unless you're planning to recharge and then use them up immediately, it's worth it. The common brand name here ...


12

Usually, we buy more batteries. For pros, a few extra batteries is a very marginal business expense, and for serious enthusiasts, it's usually just worth it. I always want a spare battery for my DSLR, even though it has excellent battery life. If you're in the studio, an AC adapter may be an option — although even then, keeping the camera free of an extra ...


12

Partially functionality and partially profit. With my Canon 5D Mark iii, I use a battery grip. The battery grip provides two power options. One, I can use 2 of the typical Canon proprietary battery packs in parallel or I can use 6 AA batteries that take up roughly the same amount of space. When I use the AA batteries, the camera performance suffers ...


11

Yes! This is a normal problem with rechargeables, and there is a type of battery made to solve it — low-self discharge NiMH. These will hold a charge for months sitting idle. The downside is lower capacity, but I find that a small price to pay for actually being useful. The main brand is Sanyo Eneloop, but there are others, too.


11

Yes, they do. "Body only" means as opposed to in a kit with a lens. You should actually get a battery, matching charger (except in the now-rare case of cameras which use AA cells), an instruction manual and probably a CD with software, maybe some random cables, and various other little bits and pieces like a viewfinder cover. In fact, the manual will ...


11

It really depends on the model but modern cameras are very good at saving power during sleep mode. Sleep mode however on most cameras consumes some non-negligible amount of power, so if you wanted the more battery-life then turning it off is better. Even better than off is to remove the battery as some cameras, particularly Nikon DSLRs, use power even when ...


10

Nikon produces excellent manuals for their flashes, with a lot of great technical information (rivaled in this area only by Metz). The following is from the SB-600 User Manual, page 19: Alkaline-manganese | 3.5 sec. | 200 / 6-30 sec. Lithium | 4.0 sec. | 400 / 7.5-30 sec. Nickel | 2.5 sec. | 180 / 6-30 sec. NiCd (1000 mAh) | 2.9 ...


10

As noted by others, if you want a battery that is a straight replacement for rechargeable AA cells then LSD (low self discharge) NimH will meet your need. LSD cells have more, not less, lifetime cycles than standard cells. A first generation Sanyo Eneloop cell offers about 1000 cycles (compared to less than 500 for a standard NimH cell) and their new 2nd ...


10

All of the camera bodies being produced by major manufacturers (Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Olympus, etc) ship with a battery and charger. You don't need to purchase an additional battery or charger.


10

No, this is safe as long as the battery is not in the charger. Some chargers may have a small power drain from being plugged in (even when not charging anything), but it shouldn't do any damage to the device to leave it plugged in.


10

All else being equal, yes. A bigger sensor requires more power. Advancement in power-saving technologies can sometimes improve that but with higher pixel counts being the norm, we do not see much of that. Each pixel requires circuitry so higher megapixels require more power than making the sensor bigger. Luckily bigger cameras have room for bigger ...


10

I never take my battery grip off my 5D mark iii. The extra battery life that it gives is wonderful. That said, I use it with the official batteries and I have a total of 4 regular batteries for it. I do still have a loaded and ready to go AA tray in-case of emergency, but AA's don't really work well as a battery option because they still provide less ...


9

I had a super cheap non-Canon battery in my 400D and it was as good as the Canon one. But I wouldn't trust a sample of 1 if I were you ;) Although you mention in the details you have a 450D, I'll add an answer to the generic Canon question for others that may read this. For some Canon cameras (such as the 7D) the battery holds special information ...


9

Rechargeable Ni-Mh batteries have a lower voltage, and a higher current. This gives a faster recycle time. I use Sanyo Eneloop batteries, which claim to have a long shelf life. The claim is that they retain 85% of their charge over 12 months. I have no reason to doubt them, although I have only been using them for 6 months. update I have now been ...


9

One other thing - don't mix your batteries with different specs. In your case, mixing 2500mAh batteries with 800mAh batteries will be causing you problems.


9

If the batteries are multi-celled, then yes, full discharge is good, once every couple of months. There are sensors that combine readings from multiple cells to determine capacity and balance the cells to improve efficiency and overal capacity. Other than that, Li-Ion still prefers shallow discharges. To maximize Li-Ion batteries' life, store them in cold ...


9

(from comments) Find the exact model here, and look for the specifications: http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/camera/film/series_eos.html Note that there are many different models that are called "Canon EOS Rebel something", and some of them use different kinds of batteries. For example, EOS Rebel XS seems to use CR123A batteries while EOS Rebel 2000 uses ...


9

When I am out shooting I always leave my Canon switched on, after 30 seconds or so it goes into sleep mode. I have never noticed any negative effect on battery life. Leaving it switched on means that it is ready to shoot as soon as I need it and I don't risk missing a photo opportunity. I will usually turn it off when I put the camera into my camera bag ...


9

If you're going to use the camera with regularity, you simply need an extra battery, in my opinion. You will, eventually, have a few days where you can't recharge for some reason so having the extra on-hand is important. You may forget to recharge, you may not be near electricity, you may have forgotten your charger, etc., and having an extra battery just ...


9

You can buy dedicated accessories for charging all kinds of stuff, or you can spend a little more and get a car converter 12V -> 110V, or 220V, depending on what your chargers need. Then you can connect just about any standard device to it, as long as its current (wattage) requirements are not too high. Here is one similar to one I have and it came in ...



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