Evening

by w.hrybok

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

China is huge. China is so huge that two cities can seem to be two different countries. This means Chinese do travel to other cities as "tourists" too. I am from Hong Kong, so I am a Chinese too. So being in China I think I can offer some good insight. Fact is, Chinese who travel to other cities as tourists are often the more wealthy ones, and enjoy a so ...


16

About 6 months after buying my 7D, I got the associated battery grip for it, and my feelings on it are mixed... As others have said, at times, the duplicated buttons for portrait orientation can come in extremely handy. Not only do they allow you to operate the camera in portrait mode without craning an arm over to reach the normal buttons, but because of ...


13

The battery door. This is where the door that is normally on the camera goes while you have the battery grip on the camera. That way, when you remove the grip, you can easily put the door back on without losing it. The manual shows how it works.


10

I never take my battery grip off my 5D mark iii. The extra battery life that it gives is wonderful. That said, I use it with the official batteries and I have a total of 4 regular batteries for it. I do still have a loaded and ready to go AA tray in-case of emergency, but AA's don't really work well as a battery option because they still provide less ...


8

That is a Canon WFT-E3A Wireless Transmitter Grip for the 40D and 50D... It allows you to upload photos immediately to a computer or other storage device, as you're shooting.


8

Why buy a grip? To add some bits to the other response: better handling for portrait orientation. A good grip will duplicate not only the shutter but also other controls (joystick, buttons etc.) in order to quickly have them in the same place like in the landscape orientation. Really helps. the camera is heavier. Important for heavy lenses (zooms) in ...


7

Personal Experience Well, nobody seems to be giving an answer, so here is my own setup... I use Eneloop NiMH batteries in the 3rd-party battery grip on my Canon 5D mkII. It takes 6 batteries in a magazine or it can take 2 Canon batteries. The eneloops seem to do a decent job, although I don't think they give me anywhere near the running time of a pair ...


7

I haven't used it, but I know that battery drain with aftermarket grips is a common complaint on photography forums. And people with genuine Canon and Nikon units always reply that they have no such issues. I would say it's a defect with that particular unit. You could try a 2nd Vello grip and you may find it works well. It shouldn't drain the batteries ...


6

If your bag moves the dial more often then you do, then give the camera to someone who uses it more :) Seriously, while there will be measurably more use, it should be comparatively marginal. Perhaps it will die a day sooner than otherwise but I wouldn't be concerned about this.


5

Consider this half an answer or an answer to half your question :) Most cameras on the market use custom batteries. This allows the camera manufacturer to provide a precise and reliable experience for the user. The downside is increased cost and inconvenience since options are limited. AA batteries are great and Pentax still makes DSLRs that use AAs and ...


5

An indirect answer: the type of battery being used makes a difference. Lithium ion batteries are standard because they provide very consistent high performance for both the entirety of the charge and the life of the battery. They will last a long time, are meant to be recharged frequently, and perform well in many conditions. Cost is their downside. If ...


4

I have a Canon 600D and I've purchased a third party (Travor) battery grip for it as well. I think it is the best accessory I've purchased for my camera yet. I does everything that Mike said in his post "So, the pros are that it allows easier, steadier camera use in portrait orientation, balances the camera well, and gives you longer shooting time with ...


4

This is completely dependent on the make/model of the DSLR. Some ONLY use the extra battery power as reserve, while others will register the availability of the extra power and drive the AF motor more vigorously. But this is brand/make/model specific.


4

No the Canon BG-E5 is not officially compatible with the 1100D. Canon have not released a battery grip for the 1100D, neither does it appear they are planning to, since the SD card slot is inside the battery compartment you'd have to remove the grip every time you changed memory cards. This appears to be another "feature" that is deliberately missing from ...


4

For weddings and such I would say that it's definitely worth it to get a grip. It's very convenient to be able to switch into taking portrait orientation images without having to change into an awkward positon with one elbow up in the air. It also looks and feels more professional, which makes you feel more confident, and people that you are photographing ...


4

It all depends on which Info screen you are talking about and what is currently displayed on the rear LCD when you press the INFO. button. If you are shooting and you press the INFO. button to cycle to the Shooting Functions screen on the rear LCD, the value will be displayed as a combined one, as will the value displayed on the monochrome LCD on the top of ...


4

As per my instruction manual: "Be sure to attach the battery grip to the camera before inserting the batteries. The results of the battery check may not be displayed properly if you attach the battery grip to the camera with the batteries already inside." Also the battery grip power button is specifically for the additional camera controls on the battery ...


3

Battery grips takes up a huge space like 1.5x bigger camera and adds on weight just the same. If you carry it for a few hours in your hand your arms may hurt. If you're shooting in the streets battery grips are scary just as big zooms are. People will be more shy in front of your camera. So in street photography smaller is better. The only benefit of a ...


3

Before setting the camera down I often do a quick check to see that the hood is on tightly and correctly, and retract the zoom. That is, the lens should be in its shortest position because the weight is least likely to cause any undue pressure. I don't know how tough the hood on your lens might be. Modern Nikon hoods all seem to be about the same, which is ...


3

I always though I needed one so I finally got one. After reading many reviews I decided to save money and get an aftermarket brand. The look and feel of the grip was great and matched my camera nicely but I soon noticed that the grip was draining my batteries even when the camera was in the off position. In 24 hours my batteries were completely drained ...


3

I own two Canon EOS bodies, a 450D and a 7D. I did quite a bit of research on battery grips for the 450D some time ago, and settles on a Zeikos brand one. I was extremely happy with it. The build quality was superb, the grip rubber was nice and grippy, and very similar to the native grip of the camera body, and it offered all of the features of a Canon brand ...


3

I have used both the Flipbac Grip 2 and the RF grip (on my previous S90). The RF grip is nice but the Flipbac Grip is no compromise. I feel it is much better value for money. It fit my S95 perfectly. On a recent weekend trip with my wife it was invaluable. Easy one hand holding. It feels good and looks good. I don't own my camera long enough to justify the ...


3

You can only see the detailed battery status under the Battery Info display in the menu. The LCD on top and Info screens show a combined status (average) for simplicity, though the camera will generally use power from both batteries roughly evenly. The Battery Info screen (found under the third section of the Wrench menu) will display shutter counts for ...


3

The entire light box, including the rectangular reflex mirror would need to be rotated as well. You would also either need a second prism/viewfinder to catch the light coming off the rotated mirror or you would need to be able to rotate the prism/viewfinder as well. The same goes for the AF array in the floor of the light box that catches light off the ...


3

I think the short answer is that you'd have to design a new mount specifically to achieve this, or use a smaller sensor than the mount would otherwise support (e.g. ASP-C sensor with an EF-only mount; no EF-S). If you take the lens off a Canon 5D, for example, and look at the mirror/sensor (you can use Bulb mode or the sensor cleaning mode to see it) you'll ...


2

You shouldn't have any problems with a grip designed for the T2i working on a T3i. They have the same body shape on the bottom, and both use the same battery. As you said, the Canon grip is identical - the BG-E8, so there is no reason why other brands wouldn't work the same. The only reason one of them wouldn't work for some reason is if it had extra ...


2

There is a tradeoff between cost and performance. The best-performing batteries are the disposable lithium batteries, e.g. the Energizer Lithium line. These have a higher capacity than regular AA batteries and, important for photography, better sustained performance as they wear down. Also, they're noticeably lighter, which is a nice perk for something ...


2

I've got Zeikos grips for both my 5DII and 7D. They work fine. Sometimes I have to wiggle the right hand battery in the one for the 7D to get the camera to see it. Once the battery is seated, the camera sees it, and the door to the battery compartment is closed I've never had it stop being recognized until the battery is removes and reinserted. The build ...


2

For the 600D, I would say, yes it's worth it. I have a 7D now and do not use a grip, as it makes the camera too heavy and bulky, but back when I started out with a 450D I had the battery grip attached to it almost permanently. I think the primary thing it did for me was make more comfortable to hold, as it was a smaller sized dslr. I also liked the extra ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible