India Point Park

India Point Park
by matt-ball                

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10

Here's a solution using python and opencv: This will crop all the faces it finds in the jpeg photos in whatever folder you run it in, with the padding specified by the left, right, top, bottom variables: import cv2 import sys import glob cascPath = "haarcascade_frontalface_default.xml" # Create the haar cascade faceCascade = ...


5

There's already a similar question on the ExifTool forums. It can be done using two sequential ExifTool commands. First, make sure all the date to the same exiftool -datetimeoriginal="2015:02:22 00:00:00" DIR And then increment the time on each exiftool '-datetimeoriginal+<0:0:${filesequence}0' DIR


4

This will probably require a bit of scripting or programming. Read up on the Circle Hough Transform. Basically, it detects circles in an image. While the maths are quite complicated, you can probably find a decent library in a language that abstracts away a lot of the complexity. For instance, checkout the OpenCV (Open Computer Vision) library, which has C, ...


3

i'd recommend Imagemagick. Something like this should work (untested) FOR %a in (*.jpg) DO convert %a -resize 600x600 -background black -gravity center -extent 600x600 square_%a


2

As I don't have any extra photo editing programs I used iPhoto to do this. Open iPhoto with the option key held down. This gives you the option to create a new library. Create a temporary one somewhere where it will be easy to find and delete it later. Import all the Raw Pictures into the new library. Export them all in the required format. Quit and delete ...


2

Another bash version using find: #!/bin/bash read -p "please enter file suffix for raw format (e.g ORF, NEF, CR2): " suffix find . -type f -iname "*.${suffix}" | \ while read line do lowercase=$(echo "$line" | sed "s/${suffix}/jpg/gi") uppercase=$(echo "$line" | sed "s/${suffix}/JPG/gi") if [ -f "${lowercase}" ] then rm -v "${lowercase}" ...


2

Well, I didn't post my bash answer because the question specifically asked about a Windows solution, but since two other people did, here's what I came up with: for file in *.jpg do exiftool -DateTimeOriginal="1111:11:11 00:00:00" $file exiftool -DateTimeOriginal+="00:00:${file:6:4}0" $file done Avoids messing with the date command. :) Note that in ...


2

Try Irfanview. It is freeware (AFAIR) and has a very flexible batch renaming system. Other than that I would try writing a script, something along the lines of for X in $(seq -w 0 20) ; do plus=$(expr $X \* 10) exiftool -alldates+="0:0:0 0:0:$plus" image_$X.jpg done The first line creates a loop through the numbers in the file names that you have, ...


2

If you find that hitting the "auto" button in the GIMP levels dialog generally does the thing you're looking for, you can batch that as described here. Specifically, you would put this script: (define (batch-auto-levels pattern) (let* ((filelist (cadr (file-glob pattern 1)))) (while (not (null? filelist)) (let* ((filename (car filelist)) ...


2

exiv2 seems to really prefer keeping the basenames of image files and sidecar/metadata files matched. You could automate (script) the creation/deletion of copying/renaming the metadata files like you have. However, for what you want to do, I would strongly suggest using exiftool. It follows the unix stream paradigm much more closely. You can do what you ...


1

In Photoshop you can create a automation script that does the same thing over and over again . Now with that said your pictures should be kind of identical so the script works good . You record once what you normally do and then save the action - After that is the easy part just batch execute the action . Here is how to record it . Go to the Window ...


1

Have you try this way: cat Photo1.xml | exiv2 -i - thumb_Photo1.jpg This command will send the content of Photo1.xml to STDOUT and the next command will use it as STDIN and insert it in to thumb_Photo1.jpg file. P.S. In the man page of exiv2 I see this example: exiv2 -e{tgt}- filename|xmllint .... | exiv2 -i{tgt}- filename


1

I find the easiest way to 'batch process' in Lightroom is to choose an example image that has similar settings to other images and copy those edits to other images: Edit the photo to your liking. Then right click on the image, choose "Settings>Copy Settings" Check all the boxes that apply. Navigate to Library, then select all the images that you wish to ...


1

This only sets the ITPC copyright line, assumes the EXIF date information is correct, and has to be done per individual year, but it works for me. In the Library module, if your photos are filed by date, select the year's folder in the Folders pane. Alternatively, if your photos are not filed by date, select your entire Library, apply the Metadata filter, ...


1

I don't think it's possible in Lightroom. You could, however, cut down the processing passes by stitching three bracketed sets first, and then doing the HDR/exposure fusion of the panoramas, so instead of exposure-merging eight sets of images and then stitching, you stitch three sets of eight images, and then exposure merge three panos. It is possible to ...


1

I just did a 360 hdr pano using the new built in features. There isn't a one button setup that you could select them all and make it happen. You can do your first round of hdr and while it is processing use the keyboard shortcuts Alt-Shift-H (Windows) or Option-Shift-H (Mac) to use the same settings on the next bracket to get it started. Then you can go onto ...


1

I am rather certain, that you have not got to do anything. Because I think you are confusing EXIF dates with the dates of when the picture file was created. They are independent. The dates you are showing in your screen shot, are the creation and modification dates of the file, which are meaningless. What you are interested in is the creation date in the ...


1

Disclaimer: Im the developer of this tool. You can use Face Crop Jet to detect and crop faces from photos in Bulk.Images of any Format or Size is supported.Faces will be detected and cropped automatically(not just the face,a profile picture for id cards). The software can be downloaded from http://www.facecropjet.com


1

Since the best answers use non-Windows syntax, I will here post their code converted for Microsoft Windows. @StarGeek solution, very fast and simple: First set a base timestamp to all images: exiftool -datetimeoriginal="2015:01:01 12:00:00" DIR (DIR is the name of the folder containing all images.) Then assign incremental timestamps: exiftool ...


1

ImageVerifier does what you want. ImageVerifier (IV for short) traverses a hierarchy of folders looking for image files to verify. It can verify TIFFs, JPEGs. PSDs, DNGs, and non-DNG raws (e.g., NEF, CR2). IV is designed to process large numbers of images. Folder hierarchies with 100,000 images or more should be no problem. In one test run, IV ran for 14 ...


1

A bash solution would be: keep=$(ls | grep -v ps | grep -A1 JPG | grep NEF); for i in $keep; do mv $i $i.keep; done; ls | egrep -v '(JPG|keep)' | xargs rm -f; change=$(ls | grep keep | sed 's/.keep//g'); for i in $change; do mv $i.keep $i; done; If you're running Windows, you can install Cygwin to get a copy of bash.


1

Here’s a Bash script for Mac OS X or Linux. #!/bin/bash read -p "Delete JPEGs when DNG exists? Ctrl-C to cancel. [Enter] to continue: " for FILE in *.dng; do JPG_FILE=$(echo "$FILE" | sed "s/dng/jpg/g") rmtrash "${JPG_FILE}" 1>/dev/null done rmtrash is a utility that moves files to the Trash, instead of deleting them outright. You can get it from ...



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