Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

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4

This will probably require a bit of scripting or programming. Read up on the Circle Hough Transform. Basically, it detects circles in an image. While the maths are quite complicated, you can probably find a decent library in a language that abstracts away a lot of the complexity. For instance, checkout the OpenCV (Open Computer Vision) library, which has C, ...


4

Disclaimer: Im the developer of this tool. You can use Face Crop Jet to detect and crop faces from photos in Bulk.Images of any Format or Size is supported.Faces will be detected and cropped automatically(not just the face,a profile picture for id cards). The software can be downloaded from http://www.facecropjet.com


3

i'd recommend Imagemagick. Something like this should work (untested) FOR %a in (*.jpg) DO convert %a -resize 600x600 -background black -gravity center -extent 600x600 square_%a


2

Please check out http://jambula.sourceforge.net/ to batch insert shooting date/time/comment on a jpeg image in different formats and languages. A special feature is that the date stamp is lossless. It is supported on Linux and Mac also.


2

Another bash version using find: #!/bin/bash read -p "please enter file suffix for raw format (e.g ORF, NEF, CR2): " suffix find . -type f -iname "*.${suffix}" | \ while read line do lowercase=$(echo "$line" | sed "s/${suffix}/jpg/gi") uppercase=$(echo "$line" | sed "s/${suffix}/JPG/gi") if [ -f "${lowercase}" ] then rm -v "${lowercase}" ...


2

exiv2 seems to really prefer keeping the basenames of image files and sidecar/metadata files matched. You could automate (script) the creation/deletion of copying/renaming the metadata files like you have. However, for what you want to do, I would strongly suggest using exiftool. It follows the unix stream paradigm much more closely. You can do what you ...


2

In Photoshop you can create a automation script that does the same thing over and over again . Now with that said your pictures should be kind of identical so the script works good . You record once what you normally do and then save the action - After that is the easy part just batch execute the action . Here is how to record it . Go to the Window ...


2

You can use ImageMagick to add text to photos, either overlaid on the photo or on a border. See the annotation section of the documentation for a number of examples. Because ImageMagick is a set of command line tools, you can easily incorporate it into batch processes using shell scripts and other scripting tools. Example: I've got a photo of some flowers, ...


1

You can easily do it with free Faststone Image Viewer. Select images, then go to Tools -> Batch Convert Selected Images, then click in Advanced Options and in tab Watermark or Text select the text you want to place on your photos (data from exif and/or your own text).


1

I rarely use the dropper anymore, because it doesn't usually give me the results I want (accurate reproduction of all colors in the photo, even when shot under less than ideal lighting). The same goes for Auto white balance as the default WB when opening a raw file. If you're not shooting raw files, then you've got to get the WB very close when shooting or ...


1

If you have 200 images, you don't need 200 different white balance setting unless the temperature of the lighting also changed 200 times. Since you shot RAW (you did right?) the WB setting you initially chose matters very little (although as proven on this site, it matters a bit). Just select the images that were shot in the same lighting, perhaps 40 images, ...


1

If I understand your question correct, I cannot provide an out-of-the-box solution, but a reasonable starting point. The program “facedetect” (https://www.thregr.org/~wavexx/software/facedetect/) will give you coordinates of the detected faces. You could use this data to write a little script that does the cropping to your taste. On the linked site are two ...


1

I use IrfanView for batch resizing. It is a free program and has many powerful tools including the ability to batch file resize by file size, megapixel size, or Both. http://www.irfanview.com/ Here are two screen captures of the batch file page. Under "Advanced" you can set Width and Height or MegaPixel size. Under "Options" you can set a file size ...


1

If you have Photoshop or equivalent, you can make an action to open each jpeg in turn, *add a new background layer in a neutral color, goto the coin layer, *select the the color of the background that the coin was sitting on when photographed, *edit the selection to make it smaller (using 'refine edge'), *delete the selection. [That will leave the coin ...


1

Have you try this way: cat Photo1.xml | exiv2 -i - thumb_Photo1.jpg This command will send the content of Photo1.xml to STDOUT and the next command will use it as STDIN and insert it in to thumb_Photo1.jpg file. P.S. In the man page of exiv2 I see this example: exiv2 -e{tgt}- filename|xmllint .... | exiv2 -i{tgt}- filename


1

I find the easiest way to 'batch process' in Lightroom is to choose an example image that has similar settings to other images and copy those edits to other images: Edit the photo to your liking. Then right click on the image, choose "Settings>Copy Settings" Check all the boxes that apply. Navigate to Library, then select all the images that you wish to ...


1

This only sets the ITPC copyright line, assumes the EXIF date information is correct, and has to be done per individual year, but it works for me. In the Library module, if your photos are filed by date, select the year's folder in the Folders pane. Alternatively, if your photos are not filed by date, select your entire Library, apply the Metadata filter, ...


1

Try the free-to-try Lightroom Enfuse plugin. Place exposure alternatives in stacks, and the plugin can batch process them all in one go. Most of the time with perfect results. I usually also lower contrast a bit, and set blackpoint to -20.


1

ImageVerifier does what you want. ImageVerifier (IV for short) traverses a hierarchy of folders looking for image files to verify. It can verify TIFFs, JPEGs. PSDs, DNGs, and non-DNG raws (e.g., NEF, CR2). IV is designed to process large numbers of images. Folder hierarchies with 100,000 images or more should be no problem. In one test run, IV ran for 14 ...



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