Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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31

Photographic workflow applications such as Adobe Lightroom and Apple's Aperture provide this sort of history as a built in part of their functionality. When you edit a RAW file in these, no changes are ever made to the original image. Instead, they are saved as 'instructions' separately. Thus, you can see a history of all changes made, and with a click ...


26

Depends on how much you value your shots. Last year my wife and I took a 5 month photographic trip and we took: 1 Laptop: We had Lightroom to download and do a basic selection every night (out of focus pictures don't need to take any disk space!). Photoshop to do some basic retouches if we wanted to publish them on Flickr, etc. And a large enough HD to ...


20

Photo backups are like backing up any other data, and so the same principles from computing apply: You want to have one active copy. This would be your memory card and/or computer hard drive when you're editing/organizing. You want to have one easy-to-access backup. This is so that you can get the safe copy in the event that you have a minor crash or ...


16

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


15

not the answer you want, but I don't consider online backup to be cost effective yet. Costs are going down, but I find the annual cost is still more than it'd cost to buy a good firewire drive, copy the data, and store it in a drawer at a friend's house or some other offsite location. And think about this. How long will it take to archive 100Gb of data onto ...


13

There are quite a few different online backup options, such as Amazon S3, http://www.mozy.com, http://www.dropbox.com, http://www.carbonite.com... One of the better options given your information is an unlimited plan, these are getting harder to find, but Carbonite is one of the sites that does still offer this option.


12

Burning DVD is your best option and even if you use another means, you should still burn DVDs. The main advantages are: Burned DVDs have no value, they won't gets stollen by themselves. It is easy to replicate and distribute. Meaning you don't have to keep all copies in the same place. When I travel for photography I always burn everything twice. One ...


11

If I'm feeling paranoid about backing up, I use a Nexto DI, which can backup a card directly to its own internal drive. It reads CF/SD/SDHC, doubles as a USB2/external SATA drive, and is much faster than most of the other similar products I could find. (There are a bunch of similar products available, but this one had the best reviews at the time, about 6 ...


11

I have two hard drive backups but no online backup as my ISP counts uploads and I'd rather not spend mountains of time waiting for gigabytes of RAW files to back up. This, I suppose, would be a subjective preference, whereas hard drive backup is essential. This is my setup. The 1TB hard drive is backed up using Time Machine, and the 750GB is backed up using ...


10

Fast internet access can be a problem in many remote locations (esp. Africa, Asia and South America). I'd suggest buying a bunch of 16 GB SD cards and copying each file on two cards. Then you keep one copy with you and send another home via mail.


10

I've had a couple of purpose-built copy-and-store devices that I bought for the same reasons you describe. One had a hard disk built in and the other burned CDs. They worked, but the better models were (and still are) costly. On the one with the built-in disk, I didn't like the idea that I couldn't pull the drive from the unit, plug it into a PC and ...


9

You have to have an onsite solution (easy, quick and cheap) and also an offsite storage (if something happens to your house (flooding, fire, robbery), you lose everything). The onsite solution is easy. As said, external drives are the best, you will then have tons of applications to help you synchronise this. Avoid manual backups as you'll end up forgetting ...


9

There are several services available. Mozy Carbonite BackBlaze CrashPlan DropBox SugarSync There's a few reviews of these here: TechRadar Macworld It's worth also checking if your broadband upload speed is fast enough. Using this calculator, for a 512kbps upload speed 150Gb would take just over a month. Another check is that you don't get charged ...


8

Extremely important for professionals. Most magazines publish photographs, not excuses. So if your camera gets attacked by a bear, falls into a lake, gets stolen, you still have to be able to bring back photos. Many events are once in a lifetime or occur extremely infrequently, which gives you only one chance to capture them. For amateurs there is ...


7

It all depends on the risks that you're backing up against but one option you'd missed is the dedicated devices for backing up memory cards (Jobo and the like) - we had one of these circulating at our wedding, so that all the guests didn't have to worry about memory card space.


7

I use 2 external HDDs. One I keep at home. The other I keep at work as my sort-of offsite home backup strategy. I sync these 2 disks every few days. I also host some personal websites with Dreamhost. As part of their hosting package, they provide up to 50GB of free backup space, so I also backup there as well. If I didn't have that option, I'd probably ...


7

I personally find remote, online storage to be the most "comforting". No chance of a fire, theft or power spike wiping out everything. For total security it seems impossible to beat Amazon's S3 storage since they write each chunk of data to multiple geographically separate data stores, read it back and do it again if they don't agree (then it rolls through ...


7

I use Epson P-5000 Multimedia Storage Viewer - it has 80 GB Hard Drive.


7

S3 (Amazon's Simple Storage Service) itself is more of a service backend for SaS and 3rd party developers. As a developer who's worked on S3 before, it isn't the ideal platform for an end-user back solution. If you are a developer S3 is great, considering the substantial cost savings you get over services that are built ontop of S3 (like Mozy). Plus, you ...


7

Professional: Short answer: Are you mad ? !!!!!!! [ :-) ] Longer answer: For a professional lack of a backup body is ~= "death-deferred". You could consider that "being able to access an alternative acceptably quickly at an acceptable cost" is the equivalent to having a backup body, so if you were a studio only photographer and there was a 24/7/365 ...


7

I would scan at the max of 600 dpi - however if the print resolution is so low that printing artifacts are visible at this resolution (e.g. small colored dots), then the result should either be downscaled or a median filter should be applied to eliminate them (or both). Don't go under 300 dpi no matter what or you won't be able to use them to reproduce new ...


6

Google Picasaweb. It has a web-based interface and a "Private albums" feature. For 200GB of storage it's $50/year, which isn't too bad. (You can purchase more, up to 16TB, should you need it.) You can also bulk upload from it's desktop client.


6

The simplest option is the External HDD that reads memory cards, like the HyperDrive. Fast, you can use your own HDDs, etc. seems good... I dont like the idea of all my eggs in one basket, so i would (if I where not backing up to my laptop and keeping files on my CF cards also and sometimes even to another external HDD) backup to the external drive (like ...


6

I'd say that external hard drive and online backup are the only realistic options: External hard drive - cheapest solution; note that even if the external hard drive does break, you will still have a copy of the data on your computer (costs about $50 for a 500GB drive). Online backup - safest, but most expensive solution Dropbox: $9.99/50GB/month or ...


6

Two standard hard disks is the simplest and most economical backup solution. One disk is kept off site in case your house burns down. You can use regular (and cheap) internal hard disks if you have external SATA ports on your machine. If you have somewhere to keep the backup disk at work taking it home one evening a fortnight works well. Every 12-18 months ...


6

An Eye-Fi card in the camera coupled with a phone that can act as a wireless hotspot should do the trick. The Eye-Fi card will (based on your configuration) automatically upload the photos to a service of your choice such as Flickr, and the portable hotspot means that you'll have connectivity as long as you have cell coverage. For a hotspot there are ...


6

Virtual Changes I use Lightroom v3 and this product has a non-destructive workflow. This allows me to do changes to my image(s) in a virtual sense. Version Control I then use SVN to maintain control the Lightroom Catalog (Just a simple SQLite DB) and this essentially gives me version control over the virtual changes. Redundancy I have RAID 6 setup that ...


6

ImageMagick to the rescue. I think the first step to any solution is to reduce the size of your collection. If you want to compare the photos by its content, especially when some are slightly modified versions of one another, a very good start is to reduce them to thumbnails and then compare the thumbnails. This is particular helpful when you want to find ...


6

Never backup just at home. All backup solutions have some chance of failure including the loss, theft, fire, floods and natural disasters. There should be two copies in two different physical locations at all times. So, even if you make the backups at home, be prepared to take one elsewhere. Mine duplicates go in a safe at the bank. For the highest volumes ...


6

The best option, and one which I use myself, is two fold. I've done this for a couple years now, and while at times it is tedious, it is the only way I actually feel safe about my LARGE photography library (~40,000 RAW photos, averaging around 23mb each) as well as my growing library of edited photos, photos sized for web publishing, photos sized for various ...



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