Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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10

If the crossbar is fixed and won't rotate (e.g. it has a pin though it), using an A-clamp to secure the paper to it will often work. If the crossbar can rotate (or the A-clamp doesn't have enough grip or surface area to keep from turning itself) set the clamp so the handles brace against the upright support (or around the knob on a C-Stand). Make sure to ...


10

Any of them are going to work fine for a home studio, presuming you have the space to set things up. Some things to consider, however, are: Stands to hold the backdrop. It may seem a little obvious, but if you want to have flexibility in your use of backdrops, at least a basic stand is going to be something to get. Reuse of the backdrop(s). Fancier ones, ...


10

A few random thoughts, from which you can draw conclusions: seamless paper is cheaper but it's an ongoing expense, the cloth would be a one-time purchase the cloth backdrop requires being kept clean easier to pull the seamless out a long way and run it curving down onto the floor and under your subject for, um, more seamless look, especially with a white ...


10

To get the "blown out" white background you have to overexpose the background. You have no choice, in order to over expose the background you need a very powerful light aimed at the background. If you have two flashes place one of them behind or to the side of the subject aimed directly at the background behind the subject (unmodified, without an ...


9

Addressing your surfaces question, I tried a couple things before I read somewhere (I forget now) to buy some 3'x4' poster board from a craft store and paint them several colors you like then use them as surfaces and backdrops for you photos. Most of the later photos I shot here were done using my poster boards. There are some even more adventurous ...


7

Just to add to what Nlr was written: You have no choice, in order to over expose the background you need a very powerful light aimed at the background. Instead of "very powerful", what should actually be said: two stops brighter than the exposure of your subject. So for a given ISO and shutter speed, and (say) f/5.6 for the subject of your photo, you ...


6

My first suggestion would be to crop tighter. Don't include both the frosted glass table and the cutting board; include only the cutting board. I, personally, would shoot a lot on a wooden cutting board. I like the warmth and it seems like a great connection to the kitchen without showing a cluttered countertop or other prep area, for example. I see you've ...


6

I've done a lot of this work in the past and tried enough different methods to be sure that there is no quick way to do it that gives good results. You can have either quick or good, but not both together. I'd love to be proven wrong on this as I imagine I'll have to do a lot more of this work in future. Here are the three main methods I use: Manually ...


6

If you want just one background I'm going to suggest white seamless paper because it's the most versatile, some examples: Point a flash at the background directly behind you subject and it becomes pure white (and easy to mask in Photoshop) Put a soft light source very close the the subject and the background becomes black (or play with the subject-light ...


5

Of the "big two" for photography, muslin is often desirable for transport and storage because you can fold it up nice and easy, toss it in a bag, and it's lighter in weight. It's also less expensive, a prime consideration for the more frugal shooter. On the other hand it wrinkles, but that's also a positive for texture purposes, and it's also easily smoothed ...


5

As @Elendi commented, this sort of thing isn't that common. What we do see a lot where someone wants to place a portrait photo in a landscape frame is associating it with a comment, a piece of poetry, some background etc. The most common seems to be having text to one side of the photo, either left or right, but I have on occasion seen text placed on both ...


4

The right way to do this is to light your subject and your background separately. Ideally you would use two (or more) flashes to light the white background, with one on each side. However, with enough separation and a tight enough shot, one flash for the background can be enough to make this work. Set the exposure for this with a few test shots and refer to ...


3

Actually, printer paper is not true white. It's produced to fool our eyes in thinking it is, which sounds weird I know but it is. You are probably getting more transmitted light/reflection from the printer paper as it at has a small amount of gloss on it. Photographic background paper is completely matte so it will give you a slight exposure change vs ...


3

I don't think I can comment yet on other posts, or I'd do that - but here's my two cents. Posterboard etc can be varnished so that it's at least mostly water-resistant, and fairly easy to wipe clean. You can obtain matte varnishes as well, at least here, in just about any large stationery store around the paint section. You know those ...


2

I have been playing with these 2 options myself - so far I do find that the seamless paper is the better option, I find the canvas is a real pain to keep clean. However paper is heavy to keep around, bulky and needs replacing. I also found lighting the paper easier - possibly my canvas wasn't opaque enough?


2

If you are shooting from the same perspective a lot, so that the defects are in the same position, you can create a mask in photoshop to cover them up, then for future shots, you can create a new layer and reuse this mask, adjusting the new masked layer each time without having to find the defects and figure out a way to cover them over and over again.


2

Here are all the ways I know of for removing the background (in order of my preference): White Background This is done by using a white-ish background and lighting the background about 3 stops brighter than the subjects (exact lighting depending on your camera). There's no way you can do this with household lights but a flash aimed at the wall behind the ...


2

Achieving the effect is deceptively hard as you have to control reflections and stray light to make it work. Looking at the sample image that you have something like this... A plain white background. Black plastic / PVC / Vinyl under the object on a table with a gap between that and the background. Put down roughly in this case to give an uneven surface. ...


2

I'll follow your example and then give a bit of an explanation... Color : Green or Blue Material : Paper Screen Size : 6' paper is fine for head shots, you can go longer though Where to buy: Any good photography store What you want is the ability to key out the background and that is what green or blue paper gives you. It's fairly low cost and not all ...


1

When you extract the banana from your original background, you'll tend to include some background pixels. If the background is white you'll have white pixels. If you then place that on a light background, those white pixels won't show much, but against a darker background, they will stand out. So as you're shooting the banana, if you can try to use a ...


1

@cm49, know that this is hard to do and that you may find touching it up a bit in post is easier than getting the perfect white background. @dan's reply is spot-on. You need your background 1 to 1.5 stops brighter than your subject. And of course, depending on the distance between subject and background, you may see some bleed from the background being a ...


1

For black and white, I use paper from Savage. It comes in rolls and you can hang it on a background stand (anything high with a crossbar or shower-curtain bar. The key, as one of the other posters said, is lighting. For white, you need the background to be a stop to 1.5 stops brighter than the subject. So get some background lights. For black, just the ...


1

If you have a small, bright room with white walls, then for high key shots I'd use the walls. If you want to use a grey background for both high and low key shots, in general it's going to be easier to darken the background (flag the background with some tall foam board, cover any windows, and assuming you can get some subject/background distance) than it ...


1

Dust and Scratches Filter For dirt and smudges, if your background is untextured you can use Filter > Noise > Dust and Scratches. This will remove any defects, of any size you choose, in one go. I would make a rough selection of the background, put into a new layer, run the dust and scratches filter. Then you have the ability to use a mask if you want to ...



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