Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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20

Yes, professionals do use auto mode. Professional paparazzi use auto mode almost exclusively and will sometimes even tape up the controls on the camera to prevent any settings being accidentally altered. You don't have to know how to shoot manual to make money out of photography, if for example you know which restaurants which celebrities go to... Other ...


10

"Auto" can mean a wide range of things. Most DSLRs offer a "full auto" facility that tends to manage shutter speed, aperture, ISO and more. But most of the modes on a DSLR that are other than absolute manual mode offer a substantial automated component. And even "Manual" may have auto features lurking in the shadows (literally in some cases). Your friends ...


8

heads-up, this is not a complete answer; it might help you get to the solution though Your linux environment is perfect of Phil Harvey's ExifTool The stand alone tool might have a way to be scripted to do this. One dirty trick is to use timestamps and bracket bias data to collect images. There is a Perl library too. Also see webhdrtools which is based ...


8

You're going to need to get into loops and variables within the script to do it. Assuming the files are named sequentially as most sane cameras would generate them, then it would look roughly like this at the 50,000' elevation: //control variable, counts which photo you're on var lcv = 0; //how many photos are there? var numPhotos = 1000; //used to track ...


6

Adobe Lightroom does all of the above (apart from the VirtueMart part, sorry!). Tethering (for Canon, Nikon and Leica) and your first four wishlist items are supported right out of the box. The CSV export feature can be added with Timothy Armes' brilliant LR/Transporter plugin.


5

I have to speak out of personal experience and working a little bit with professions: It all depends on what you're trying to acheive A lot of photographers that photograph fast moving scenes, such as at parties, races, wars, etc. do not have the luxury of time in order to get amazing placement and right timing to adjusting the values in the cameras. If ...


5

I don't see why you couldn't use Publish Services for this. If you are in the Library module, it is on the left pane all the way at the bottom. Simply setup a new Publish Services to your hard drive, and select the criteria that you would like to use, such as Photos Edited today with 5 Stars. Once you have that setup, you can really extend the functionality ...


4

Applescript in Photoshop CS5 is pretty broken according to this thread. Try this: tell application "Adobe Photoshop CS5" set theImage to "/Users/jedrek/Pictures/temp.jpg" with timeout of 5 seconds open alias theImage as Camera RAW end timeout end tell


4

Sometimes, outsourcing this particular job is best, especially if it involves a large volume of material. I'm pretty sure there are lots of them offering these services in your area.


4

Since you're open to a negative scanner consider the Nikon Super Coolscan 5000ED, it can scan whole rolls of negatives, individual 6-photo strips of negatives or up to 50 slides (in a slide hopper) at a time. I use the 6-photo strip adapter and slide hopper. The 50 slide hopper and negative roll adapter are extra attachments you need to purchase but the ...


4

I use Lightroom to sort through photos. In the Library module I set the filter to Flagged and Unflagged, then make a photo fill the screen. Then I just start hitting the right arrow key or the "x" key. "X" marks the photo as "rejected" and makes it no longer visible. It's easy to jet through 1000 photos in no time. Once I've gone through all photos, I just ...


4

If you have a Canon DSLR and are willing to install Magic Lantern then there is a great feature that solves this problem nicely. When you do bracketed shots through ML you can configure it to generate a small shell script that runs enfuse on the set of images. The script is written to the same directory as the pictures. I don't really use the scripts ...


4

Manual focus is often used in situations where you need very accurate focus on a very specific part of the image, for example, for macro photos where the depth of field is so small you can't even get the entire subject in focus. Another situation where manual focus is used when auto focus just doesn't work, usually because you don't have enough light. And ...


3

When shooting weddings, I tend to use Auto (P) but monitor it closely and change mode as needed. For the most part, a modern Automatic mode on a high end DSLR will give you a lot of control while in auto through both the EC (exposure compensation) and by having one of the dial's bound to alter the aperture for the next shot. In general, the camera does a ...


3

Yes to your title question. No to the one related to EXIF data. You can specify on import any number of static keywords but, without a third-party plugin, there does not seem to be a way to create keywords dynamically. What puzzles me is why would you want to add keywords from the EXIF since that would only duplicate information. Lightroom is equally ...


2

Try Jeffrey Friedl's Tree Publisher Plugin. It's gives you a publish service that will preserve your tree structure. You can set it up using Smart Collection rules to have it export a subset of your photos. In your specific case, you could have a rule that selects folders with "good" in the name. Two things it won't do: I don't believe it will handle ...


2

There is a freeware opensource software NCC (disclaimer: I am the author), it has almost the features of Nikon Camera Control Pro, and you can submit any new feature request any time.


2

With Photoshop you can use Image Processor Pro (link - scroll half way down page) to process images that will resize your photos to a specific size while maintaining aspect ratio. You could run an action to crop (aka - reduce canvas size) but as @Rob said if you do not know where the subject is how can you batch photos and crop them? You may have to do this ...


2

I think that pros use whatever mode fits them best! I'm far from a professionnal but I've been that guy who felt superior because I was using manual. Nowadays, I primarly shoot Aperture priority or Program because for my type of photography, shutter speed isn't that important. So I think that it all depends on the type of shot you are looking to achieve ...


2

It really depends on the situation and style of photography. If I had a (non-cooked-food) still life to take, I'd definitely take my time with lighting and figuring out just what I want to do with aperture and shutter speed et al, but on the street I may lose valuable shots by doing so. In an urban setting (especially here in Auckland, where in the blink of ...


2

Here is what works for me: exiftool "-directory=HDR" -if '$ShootingMode eq "Continuous, Exposure Bracketing, Auto ISO"' * If you are on Canon, use BracketMode instead of ShootingMode and AEB as the value. For Nikon try what I used. Here is a list of commands that are specific for brands. I went to Nikon and searched for "bracket" and this solution works. ...


2

Photoshop scripts are the best way to achieve this I feel. Google "Photoshop scripts polaroid"....here's one I found that might just be what you're looking for - Polaroid Generator


2

Building atop of laurencemadill's answer, if you do not want to invest the money for Lightroom at the moment, RawTherapee is a similar raw development tool that is open source and serves my basic editing needs well. It supports profiles as well and you can batch convert images at your convenience. (For example, Ctrl+A to select all, assign profile, send them ...


2

Lightroom can apply the same settings to multiple images. You can edit one image, make it look good, and then apply the same settings to the other pictures taken at the same time. It works best for things like white balance that are likely to need the same adjustments for all the images taken at the same time/location, but all of the other settings can be ...


2

Short answer is no for the reason you've stated: silver grains in black and white film block light in the same manner as dust. Color images are made of dye clouds which are translucent and do not block light. The only defect repair I'm aware of that works on b/w is SilverFast scanning software, which has a feature called SRD (not to be confused with iSRD ...


2

There is a simple method to automate the process using Photoshop. It could be recorded as an action or scripted. Load all of the images into a stack and take the median of each pixel (there is a built in function to do this, might just be in Photoshop extended though). This should give you an image of just the background. Load up the first image and paste ...


1

I wrote a quick post explaining how I complete the same task. You can find it at my blog I summarize it here. Using ExifTool it’s quite trivial to achieve our intent. Just a matter of one command line: exiftool "-directory=HDR" -ext CR2 -if '$bracketMode eq "AEB"' .


1

Canon publishes an SDK for interfacing with their EOS cameras called EDSDK. In order to use it, you must live in the US, register through their website and fill out an application. If they accept your application (which they usually do), you will be given a link to download the SDK for free. Canon also accepts applications from non-US residents through ...



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