Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

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2

In the second image there's a metal-bar-looking-thingy right between the mother's and father's head that is very much in focus (at least it looks like that on the web-sized image) - so I would guess the AF focused on that bar and not the mother's face. The area covered by the AF sensor is substantially larger than the rectangle you see in the viewfinder so ...


0

Not necessarily the cause, but I have the same lens (on Nikon mount) and it has been reported to suffer from relatively bad autofocus and sometimes front-focus issues. I saw it happen sometimes with 50 mm focal length, wide aperture (f/4 may still be considered wide in this respect) and close subjects. Your pictures are not actually close-ups, so I would be ...


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1/3000 Such bright light is crazy fast! What is your ISO here? General rule of thumb suggests you want the slowest ISO possible for the conditions (to avoid noise). Another rule of thumb (for handheld photos), if your shutter speed is faster than your focal length you should be fine (ie., 24mm and 1/30 sec or 200mm at 1/200 should produce shard imagery). No ...


0

Probably Fujis X-M1 and other X-Trans sensor Fuji cameras. They have impressive low-light performance (not the autofocus, but the image result), even better then DSLR and even Full frame sometimes - check out image comparison on dpreview for high-iso. Colors are nice as well. But they force you to use JPEG at high iso, and I think you might have to do manual ...


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I'm having similar problems with my E-PM2. I think that you can't escape some trial and error. I was trying to take a photo of someone sleeping in the dark. I found a spot in the room which was enough illuminated to allow me to focus on. I attempted to place myself at the same distance from this illuminated object as I would be from my subject, and focused ...


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If your camera supports focus tracking and you are shooting in that mode (could not find the info about this), the camera keeps focus. Otherwise, depth-of-field (DOF) will determine if the object stays in focus or not. That is determined by many factors, see the entire Depth of Field Wikipedia article, which describes the phenomenon. The section "Factors ...


1

When you've focused the lens at a certain point you've actually focused an entire plane (that includes the point you've set your focus at) called the focal plane. This plane is perpendicular to the optical axis of the lens. Objects that are close to this plane (but not in it) may be acceptably in focus depending on the depth of field. The left diagram ...


0

There's no standard method, some form of local gradient estimation (such as Lapace or Sobel filters) will be involved. The best ones probably use a form of deconvolution (mathematical reversal of the blurring effect you get when the lens is defocussed) in order to estimate how far away the image is from being in focus. For more information on deconvolution, ...


1

Since autofocus quality and speed are very important selling points, the algorithms are almost certainly proprietary (though they may be based on well-known ones) and kept secret by the camera makers.


5

This photo is severely back focused. Areas about 15-20 feet behind the main subjects are in focus. Some things to keep in mind: When using wider apertures, especially combined with larger sensors, Depth of Field becomes shallower. So any focusing errors are more apparent. This is especially a problem in low light when most camera's auto focusing systems ...


1

The picture was taken in low light conditions and then the following issues will start to conspire against the sharpness of the picture: The autofocus is not very accurate in low light conditions The small 18mm focal length instead of, say, 50 mm also makes the autofocus less reliable The exposure time of 1/60s seconds is not fast enough to prevent ...


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I suspect what you're seeing here is that the depth of field when using a large sensor camera like the D5200 is much smaller than that from something like a smartphone or a typical compact camera, especially when you're using a relatively fast lens like your Sigma. It's a little hard to tell on the image you've posted, but it looks to me like the gentleman ...


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Using the center focus point will assuredly always give you a nice clean and crisp focus. I have found with many cameras that many times, because of the curve of the lens, the optimal focus point is always the center one. If you are looking for perfect clear focus, use the center focus point and then recompose your shot if needed.



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