Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
by andy-m                

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7

You need to disable exposure simulation. The EOS M doesn't have a menu option for this but it is disabled with an ETTL flash or ETTL trigger in the hotshoe. (actually any Canon "dedicated" flash will also communicate with the camera and disable Exp Sim) You could also install Magic Lantern as it includes a menu option to disable Exp Sim.


3

The target is under illuminated and underexposed. If the jpeg was generated in-camera the camera probably applied fairly aggressive noise reduction to the image. This will reduce the acutance of the image. If you haven't already, put the camera on a stable platform, such as a tripod. Use base ISO and expose for as long as necessary to properly expose the ...


3

The focus looks nearly if not completely spot-on on my monitor, though try leveling the focus chart (you can see it's slightly tilted, which will throw off your measurements). You are more likely to be seeing the effect of spherical aberration in the lens, which manifests as a "glow" even on in-focus parts of the image. That this is common in all fast ...


3

Switch the camera to using a single auto-focus spot in the middle of the frame. Most high end cameras have this capability. I don't know if your Sony camera can do that or how it will show you the spot if it does, but look around the owners manual. On my Nikon, the autofocus spots are shown as small red rectangles in the viewfinder. You point the spot at ...


2

With most Nikon cameras and AF lenses with focus motors in the lens, there are switches on both the lens and the camera that must be turned on for AF to be enabled. If there's not a physical switch on the camera (usually in the area near the lens release button that must be pressed to remove the lens), then it is probably buried somewhere in the menu. If ...


2

Bird photography is the kind of situation where you have to select one of the auto-focus point (usually the center one). With such setting, you have a better control where the focus is done (as the camera will not switch between the focus-points). Furthermore you do not really care if the subject is right in the center of the image as, most of the time, you ...


2

You cannot choose multiple points to have in focus at the same time in a shot. You can let the camera choose which one of several points it will use as a focus point in the shot, but the camera will not make any attempt to get all the points in focus - just one. You have limited control over how much of a scene around a selected single focus point will be ...



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