Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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23

I've never attempted to photograph the Aurora Borealis myself however the following advice applies to most celestial photography: You will want the fastest (biggest aperture) lens you can get your hands on. The 50 f/1.4 is ideal, though the focal length is quite long for this sort of thing. It's good because it will let in about 5-6 times as much light as ...


19

Basically, you need to do some post processing on this image. From the original, the first step I performed was to make the darkest part black and the lightest white. That alone made a sizeable diffefence since your original lightest spot was only (.37, .34, .38). In other words, you were wasting over 60% of the dynamic range. Original: Black and ...


14

Well, given that all I have to work with is a JPEG, the results are not perfect. If you have the original RAW, you should be able to do what I've done, and more (particularly in the deep shadows). I imported your photo into Lightroom 4.2, and made the following adjustments: Exposure: +2.0 Shadows: +100 Blacks: +100 Whites: +50 Clarity: +25 Vibrance: ...


10

There is an excellent article entitled "How to Photograph the northern lights" that basically states with a point and shoot, it's very difficult to get good pictures. It looks like your camera is one of the higher-end, it should be alright, they have some specific recommendations that I've copied below. It also gives a list of cameras that might do the ...


7

There is a little bit different here than in the linked potential duplicate. The Polarized image is roughly the same situation, but the other shot with the moon is a bit different. I applied similar edits to the Aurora from the linked question to get this result with the polarized version: There is actually quite a bit of detail in the shadows. Even at ...


5

I could make an educated guess.. Consider this picture, its EXIF data says exposed for 5 sec @ f2.8 at ISO 1600, ignoring the focal length and considering that you said most articles recommend shooting @ ISO 800 using max aperture (in your case f4) you should set your exposure for 20 seconds. @ISO 400, shutter speed needs to be 40sec @ISO 200, shutter ...


4

You need to be at the perfect latitude(65-72deg), on a crisp, cold, clear, and cloudless night, with zero light pollution, and a huge amount of luck. Even then you are pushing it with equipment like that. See the Auroa-Borealis tag here for much more info - http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/aurora-borealis


4

I had luck using all manual settings when I tried to get the northern lights a few weeks ago. I had the Sigma 10-20mm f3.5, so not a radically bigger aperture. I know the lense is a bit soft wide open, so I actually used f5-7. It wasn't too much activity, mostly the "background" lights, so we needed a very long exposure, and most of the pictures where shot ...


3

Here is the exif info. I think is quite light, but I'm working on it :). If the aurora is strong than is not quite so difficult, probably a 5-10 seconds exposure will do it. I do my photos with 25-30'.


3

I believe that this will be closed as a duplicate to this existing question: What tips and advice do you have for photographing the Aurora Borealis? But essentially you sure could use that lens and camera combo, but that isn't ideal by any means. I would much prefer to have a fixed aperture zoom lens on a full frame camera to shoot the northern lights. You ...


3

1) Yes, I believe you can capture at least something with your smartphone. There seems to be slow shutter speed apps for iPhone, I just googled a couple and those offer max 15 second shutter speed plus Bulb mode. You will need one of this kind of apps to have long exposure on Aurora Borealis. To keep your camera still during the long exposure you'll need a ...


3

If you want to photograph a green arc that is not moving a lot, then those settings (max aperture, lowest exposure possible like 5-10 sec) are fine. You might have to increase the ISO to 1600. It will have a bit of grain. But to have perfect pictures, of high activity (fast moving auroras) then you will need a f/1.4 aperture, with the shortest possible ...


2

When you get a black image, no matter what you are photographing you basically have the same 3 (or sometimes 4) options (after checking you didn't leave the lens cap on, obviously) Increase ISO - but be aware that this will also increase noise (but you can deal with that at post) Use a slower shutter speed - of course this is likely to cause motion blur ...


2

Starting with the required DLSR settings to take an aurora photo and working back, we can see what would be needed for a compact camera to capture such a picture. A clear aurora photo would use an exposure of around 5-10s at f/4 with ISO 1600 - this is obviously dependent on the intensity of the aurora, so is only a guide. If you apply the limits found on ...


2

Typical settings for northern lights are f2.8 or higher, 30 seconds and 1600-3200 iso. Also it helps if you have a full frame camera, thus you'll have less noise. 30 seconds and fast aperture and high ISO are the reason to get the shot fast enough. If your camera gets less light then you'll have to exposure longer and it will cause stars to leave a trail, ...


1

The lens is fine; you'll probably want to mostly use the wide end of the zoom range. What you really need is a tripod, since the exposure time will be on the order of seconds. With a "fast" lens (which the 18-55 unfortunately isn't), you could be able to grab handheld photos of especially bright auroras, but to get the sort of "amazing" shots you see on the ...


1

Able to see images in my view finder eye piece When looking through viewfinder, light which is entering your objective is being reflected from mirror, then from the prism so you can see it. Following picture is showing you this process: So that's why you can see your scene in your viewfinder. When you switch to live view, part 2 and 6 move, so the ...


1

I would perhaps suggest the EF-S 10-22 for the 40D. On a crop sensor camera a 28mm lens will be 44.8mm. Near enough 50mm on full frame. I think you'd need wider for most landscape stuff let along the northern lights. If it's too much money, Tokina do an 11-16 f/2.8 which would also be suitable.


1

Beyond the technical aspects of setting up your camera(which has already been covered by Matt Grum quite well in another answer), the atmospheric conditions are an important component that you will want to understand. The Kp Scale, Kp Index, or NOAA G Scale are reasonable ways to summarize the global level of geomagnetic activity. The Kp Index can range ...



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