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by Jakub

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0

I don't know the E-M10 exactly, but on the E-M5 you could use one of these approaches: Focus with the manual ring on the objective, assuming the 40-150 has one (in my memory it does). Switch the touch screen on the rear side to the point-and-shoot mode, then touch onto the moon on the display using your finger. Does this help? If not, what's the exact ...


1

Just about any DSLR will suffice by todays standards. For what its worth both Nikon and Cannon make a full set of lenses that will cover everything except for you Microscope and Telescope photography. When it comes to your telescopes adapters are pretty easy to come buy I have one for my D3300 that connects it to a 500mm refracting lens(very similar to this ...


0

The majority of all digital cameras come with computer tethering now. In terms of telescopes there are many adapters on the market which allow you to mount your camera to a telescope. You might also be interested in more specialised camera bodies like the Canon EOS 60Da which is intended to be used in conjunction with astrophotography. Does the Canon 60Da ...


3

An f/10 SCT works well photographically with an f/6.3 focal reducer/coma corrector. An f/4.7 Newtonian is also a splendid choice. Use a Baader MPCC coma corrector and you will have a flat field that rivals anything else out there, at a fraction of the price. Contact lenses on telescopes are much more economical than full aperture solutions (it's good ...


3

In order for the camera to fire, a small spring loaded connection has to be pushed in far enough. If you take off the lens and look in the exact opposite direction of the red dot, you will see a small metal point sticking out. That is it. The challenge is to ensure that the T2 mount you purchase is designed specifically for the Samsung NX range of ...


1

In many cameras, to get this to work, you enable "release without lens" in the camera menu. However, this doesn't seem to be available in the case of the Samsung NX300. According this this thread on DPReview, "Your adapter just has to depress the mechanical switch in the lens mount. Some adapters are problematic, most are fine." If the adapter you have is ...


0

The problem with wide angle lenses is that many of them have a mustache subfrequency in their bulb distortion that makes it impossible to stack the images. The image alignment that works in some parts of the frame does not work in others. In fact for this type of distortion, you will notice a smeared look on the image corners after only stacking a few ...


2

Superresolution techniques require pretty good source data to start with, and that source data usually needs slight offsets between each frame (dithering.) Without a tracking mount, you will see field rotation in the corners of the frames, and that will greatly diminish your ability to align and stack, let alone apply superresolution. Distortion mapping can ...


0

Sounds like a great idea to me, but the proof is in the software. You'd put the camera on a tripod, take your whole lotta pictures, and then hand it to the software. The software would: Pick some bright stars and track them across images to do loose mutual alignment Determine the tracking parameters (e.g. where's the North Pole, what the field of view was, ...


1

As Digital Lightcraft points out, the 200 mm focal length will prevent you from imaging objects that requires significant magnification, at least the resolution will be rather poor. If I were going to a dark location, I would focus on deep sky objects, many of these don't require much magnification. In fact, at low magnification, faint objects are more ...


2

with a 200mm lens you are going to struggle to see anything much, I would highly recommend you get a teleconverter, as at 200mm even the moon will be tiny. But more importantly, TEST IT BEFORE YOU GO!!!


2

When to use and not use Image Stabilization/Vibration Compensation/Vibration Reduction/etc. is lens or camera specific, depending on whether the system ins lens based or camera body based. Not all implementations are the same, even within a single manufacturers ecosystem. When shooting on a tracking mount Image Stabilization should probably be turned off, ...


-1

Your camera manufacturer manual will tell you that using IS on a tri-pod will create image blur, you must switch IS off when using a tri-pod


3

You can estimate this for a particular object you want to photograph. E.g. suppose that you want to take a picture of the Andromeda galaxy such that none of the foreground stars are going to be blown. The brightness of the foreground stars and the viewing conditions determine the longest exposure for a single shot. The seeing condition determines the maximum ...


7

I have experimented with this and found that I got blobs instead of sharp Stars with IS on. I had a Canon 7D with an EF 35mm f/2 IS Lens, mounted on top of an Equatorial Mount on top of the actual Telescope. Both the “Right Ascension” and the “Declination” Axis’ were each driven with their own Motorised Clock drives in sync with the motion of the sky. The ...



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