Fresh Dew on a Rose

by adarsha joisa

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-2

I find a short shutter release and timer on the camera captures a clear image. Take several different shots between 125-300 ISO and see how they compare Captured 26.01.2015, lens 40-150mm Olympus on an Olympus PL7, tripod used 1/125 ISO 200 f/5.6 on a tripod. The image is cropped. No post processing nor filters used. Location Bergen Norway


2

Assuming you're in the northern hemisphere and can escape the worst of the light pollution, you should be able to capture a pretty fair percentage of the Messier objects in pictures, even if the lens is a little dim to see them in the viewfinder. You should be able to rely on guide stars to get their rough location, though, and half the fun will be ...


0

Sure: I've taken picture of the Pleaides with just a fixed tripod and "bridge" camera, but you'll need a clock-drive to get exposures longer than 30 seconds or so without streaks. Digital cameras are subject to noise on long exposures, and you might need to stack multiple images. See http://www.heidgermarx.com/2011/09/image-stacking-part2/ and ...


1

It is possible to image galaxies with telephoto lenses. I won't go into a lot of detail, as Michael has already covered most of the basics. I'll simply demonstrate what can be done with a Canon DSLR (5D III in my case) and the Canon EF 600mm f/4 L II lens. I've imaged two of the larger galaxies in the night sky, Andromeda and Triangulum: These are ...


1

First and foremost, when it comes to astrophotography, to improve SNR (and, thus, improve signal) - stack! Stack, stack, stack. Total integration time, the total exposure time across all the sub frames you gather, is of paramount importance to improving image quality in astrophotography. Most beginners shirk on getting the necessary minimum amount of ...


0

Dithering in astrophotography is the slight offsetting of stars in each and every sub frame (sub). Dithering these days is usually achieved by pairing two compatible programs, such as PHD2 (guiding software) and BackyardEOS (image sequencing software), or SGP and either PHD2 or MetaGuide, and instructing the image sequencer to dither. During imaging, between ...


1

I used my father's Schmidt-Cassegrain len (i.e. a mirror lens) to make a gigantic telephoto lens. It was gave utterly phenomenal magnification, but wasn't that great quality wise. I took this picture with it: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=582370470593&set=a.503548440573.322.284200469&type=3&theater As you can see it's just a massive ...


2

Actually you can 'zoom' a telescope (in fact change focal length) just not on the fly as with a zoom lens. You can increase the focal length with a barlow lens - simila to a teleconverter, or reduce it with a focal reducer (and increase the relative aperture). They both come before the ocular or camera in this case. What you cannot modify on a telescope is ...


1

The strict answer to your question is no. I say strict because your question says "the same as". The degree of wash out is related to proximity to the moon and, of course, the brightness of the moon. When the moon is visible in the sky the area of wash out is greater than when it's below the horizon. The further away you look from the moon the less the wash ...


-2

Last night 03/01/2015 trying my cannon 650d with tmount onto scope 1/4000sec auto ISO. only had a few minutes of no clouds. Messed about with filters in photoshop.


0

I took this shot the other night, hand held using a Nikon DF with a very old Nikon 500mm F8 Mirror lens. ISO 400, 1/500 sec, -3 stops on the exposure compensating dial.


0

If you want to capture the moon, ignoring the rest of the scene, use spot metering, with the moon being the spot. See if your camera lets you move the spot around in the frame. If not, move the camera so that the moon is at the centre of the frame, meter the scene, and then move your camera to get the framing you want, and take the photo. If you want to ...


1

I've recently been trying out a Fujifilm S1 bridge camera (I have P&S cameras and DSLRs) on lunar shots and went through some of the in-camera processing modes to see what they would yield. On the S1 there is an "advanced" mode called "low-key" that works really well on the moon at almost all phases, unless you're trying to capture earthshine. Normally ...


4

If you have a reasonable statistical model of the noise sources then yes, you can do better than median filtering, but not by that much. It's much easier to boost performance by simply shooting more images. With regards to exploiting the slight misalignment of images, this can be used to increase resolution, the technique is called super-resolution and ...


0

I found this technique and it works quite well. Instead of adding one layer copy i added 5, one for the centre and I moved the other 4 copies into each direction which resulted in rounder stars. It really amplified the stars nicely but other touchup work was needed to bring back sharpness in the foreground. The basic idea is to: Open photo in Photoshop ...


2

A way I always found intensifies the stars in my astro photography is to introduce a bit of clarity - really makes the stars pop! Also have a play around with the colours in the luminosity sliders as this always works for me. Hope this helps :)



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