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You can check this article about long exposure and risks: DSLR long exposures and sensor overheat And you need good location (w/o ambient light) and some software for compass and stars/planets visibility. If you provide more information in the question you will get more valuable answers P.S. And one more point. I do not know where you will make the photos ...


1

A 50mm lens on a APS-C DSLR is going to be quite a long effective focal length for general night sky photography. It isn't that you can't do it, the issue is more that you will start to see star trails very quickly with that length. If what you want is star trails then you should have all that you need to make an attempt. Keep in mind that even more ...


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Breaking news: I don't have the link, but I read about the 7D mk ii, that it is so good he wouldn't need a special a version, and gives nicer looking reds than the a but doesn't not-take-it like normal DSLR sensor. Again, not cheap. But I note for others with this question.


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With the search term astrophotography added to dither, the hits are what you are looking for. Includingnthis one, whose synopsis is exactly whatnyou were asking http://astrotips.com/tag/dither APT - Astro Photography Tool is an application that allows controlling Canon EOS ... cameras over serial cable including mirror locking and dithering with PHD.


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Look in Clarkevision's site for his explaination and plans for a barn door mount that can keep in register for about 8 minutes. It's just a hinge offset from the camera body so it moves exactly counter to the earth as you turn the crank 1 turn per minute.


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The two lenses differ by two stops wide open. That means that at a constant ISO, you can shoot with the f/1.4 at four times shorter exposure than with the f/2.8. This is commonly referred to as the exposure triangle. You get the same exposure for all combination where aperture * aperture * shutter time * ISO is constant.


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Actually just did a ton of research on this myself and found this great article: http://www.lonelyspeck.com/lenses-for-milky-way-photography/ It give's you the run down of the different lens options and what actually goes into taking pictures of the Milky Way. Just got the lens I ordered for this the other day. Got myself a Sigma 30mm f/1.4 which, was very ...


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Both are decent scopes by decent manufacturers. The 10" is a far better scope, not just because it has about 50% more light gathering capacity but far more importantly it is an f4 lens, not an f10 lens! Now, an f10 isn't bad at all if you want to shoot smaller objects, such as the planets or parts of the moon. I hope I don't mean to be disrespectful, but ...


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Everyone talks about shortest focal length and lower aperture when shooting Milky Way, and this guy does it with f5 How is that possible? It is possible to shoot at f/5 because he is also shooting at ISO12800. A single image at that ISO would be extremely noisy, but stacking 100 images at that ISO allows the random noise from each image to be averaged ...


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Yes, it is possible to do astrophotography with your Nikon D3300 and kit lens. You will find that lens rather limiting in terms of what you can do with it, though. Your most important upgrade would be a lens with a much faster aperture. Something like a 50mm f/1.8 or like the Rokinon 24mm f/1.4. You want to focus manually for precision so a fast, manually ...



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