Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

108

Originally, film formats were arbitrary and specific to each camera model, but eventually some standards emerged. Even within the standards, there's a whole lot of 'em to choose from. But here's some common formats and a bit about their histories: 4:3 Thomas Edison's lab chose this aspect ratio for silent film, and it became the standard. No one knows ...


39

Square photos are not new, but given our mobile world, they have a unique benefit: they look the same whether viewed in landscape or portrait. Given that smartphones are normally used in portrait orientation, its no surprise that most photos are taken this way as well. However, this leads to odd viewing on landscape-first devices, like TV and PCs. By ...


22

The two most common aspect ratios are 4:3 and 3:2. You will also see a significant number of 1:1 (square) photos and 16:9 ("widescreen") images. 3:2 is the aspect ratio of 35mm film cameras, and that has carried over to most DSLRs, both the APS-C size and "full-frame". Most compact digital cameras, along with the Micro Four Thirds interchangeable-lens ...


22

That's not correct. Look at this picture: The green rectangle is a 36x24 sensor. The green circle, which has a diameter of 43.3mm, is the minimal light spot needed for that size. The blue square is 36x36 sensor. The blue circle, which has a diameter of 50.9mm, is the minimal light spot needed for that size. As you can see a lens suitable for 36x24 does ...


17

While you can drag corner handles and hope to get it right, the easiest way is to press the X key on the keyboard.


16

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


16

A few Panasonic cameras actually do have wider sensors to match 16:9. However, this hasn't really catapulted these models to success, or caused a lot of other camera makers to follow. If this were important in the market, you'd think that it would, just like the launch of the Sigma DP1 paved the way for a new class of large sensor, fixed lens compact cameras....


15

My short answer: Always make images with your full sensor, and crop in post. In your case that's probably 4:3. Why throw away data sooner when you can do so later if necessary? (Of course, this may be moot if you're shooting in raw and get all the data regardless of the in-camera crop. In that case, shoot with whatever suits your fancy, since you can always ...


15

The square photo format is as old as photography, not something new. (Even if TO and probably people in general have the impression that it is new). It has been a major tool in professional photography since its earliest days. Think of wet plate (without predefined format) and large format photography (typically almost square, 4"x5" or twice that size). ...


13

As others point out, there is no standard. I personally use somewhere between 2:1 to 3:1. I like 3:1 because 36x12 inch frames are easy to find and therefore cheap.


11

It's not the size; it's the shape. Specifically, it's the aspect ratio. That's the relative "squareness" of a photo format. For various historical reasons, there are a lot of different ones, and, as you've noticed, they don't line up. See What historic reasons are there for common aspect ratios? if you're interested in exactly why we ended up in this ...


11

It could be something to do with Instagram which opened up perhaps the best and most natural platform for sharing quick snaps. However, being only a square format until recently, with the continued arrival of newer filters, everyday snappers have naturally evolved from being mere snappers to something a little more prominent and as a result, given rise to a ...


10

The major driver behind the trend of square photos was the explosive popularity of the Instagram app. Instagram from inception and for nearly five years only allowed for square images. The reason behind the decision for Instagram to initially use square images can be heard directly from the CEO and co-founder Kevin Systrom in this Quora answer: From day ...


9

Is it possible and why it has not been done yet ? Not necessarily. A 24x36mm sensor will easily fit in an image circle that's too small for a 36x36mm sensor. Specifically, a 24x36mm sensor requires a minimum diameter of about 44mm to cover the sensor. A 36x36mm sensor would require an image circle of about 51mm diameter. A square sensor is certainly ...


8

It's really just down to what kind of image you are trying to create. 4:3 a common format for digital compact cameras as this matches standard TV and monitor aspect ratios. 3:2 is the original standard for 35mm film shooting, many DSLRs continue to use this ratio and many compact digital cameras support this as an option too. 16:9 is widescreen TV. 1:1 is ...


8

Some common panoramic film camera aspect ratios would be: 1:3 - 35mm film cropped with in-camera pano feature 2:5 - 35mm Widelux/Noblex/Horizon swing lens pano cameras, also common in old banquet view cameras 1:2 - 6x12 medium format cameras 6:17 - 6x17 medium format cameras


8

I personally only crop when, aesthetically, it has a lot to do with the subject or the limitations of having to simply take the photograph with the 3:2 aspect ratio with the camera. For example, I took a photo of a mate of mine in landscape when I could have, in hindsight, tilted the tripod mount to portrait and taken it, but because I was in the shoot ...


8

I can't speak for the industry, but I can certainly say why I wouldn't want to buy a camera with a 16:9 (or worse, wider) sensor: It doesn't suit my creative goals or assist with my task of simplifying the world. The 2:3 ratio is already far too narrow for vertical compositions, which I typically crop down to 4:5 or 5:7. Having a 9:16 sensor would further ...


8

I posted this in my comment, but here's a surprisingly simple reason: If you rotate a square image you don't have to rescale the image to display it in the same size. For a company like Instagram it makes perfect sense that they originally limited images this way, because you'll never have squashed or pinched images. Worst case you have to crop your image ...


8

Aspect ratio is only critical when matching to one printed paper size, or maybe to full screen monitor shape. Only one ratio fits another shape. And since many shapes exist, no one ratio number is very important, except for your current match, when it is all important. Otherwise, if not matching to any specific shape, then it's entirely your choice, how ...


7

Aspect ratio can also provide sense of mood or motion. Look at the photo given by Nick Bedford earlier and see how it changes by merely changing the square ratio to 16:9 ... or 9:16:


7

Looks like there is no easy solution. Here is how I manage for now. It's neither automatic nor perfect and requires a little discipline but gets you a good part of the way there. For cropped images, I used hierarchical keywords since Smart Collections are not flexible enough yet to distinguish between exact aspect ratios. Like this: This is the part that ...


7

There is no set rule for this; it all depends what you want to photograph. If a photo is wider than a 4:1 ratio, it will look a bit too thin, but you could shoot a whole 360° panorama and make an interactive QuickTime panorama that lets you pan and zoom within a window. If the end result is a good photo, it shouldn't matter what the exact proportions are.


6

Other than preference/composition, the only other consideration is that if you're making a print, shooting to the same aspect ratio as the print means that you won't have to crop any of the final image. Examples: for a 4x6 print, a 2:3 image won't require cropping, where a 4:3 would. for an 8x10 print, either 2:3 or 4:3 will require cropping, but the 2:3 ...


6

Square format is not supported, but 5:4 aspect ratio offered by D3, D3s, D800 and D800E is only slightly wider, 30mm. The nice thing is that the viewfinder is electronically masked, so you can compose with good precision. This aspect ratio is not provided on a D700 or D3x. Alternatively, you could always crop in post. Of course, you'll also need to disable ...


6

Rather than calculating the crop factor from the diagonal regardless of format, this chart is based on the largest-possible cropped print from the respective sensor. For example, for 3:2 aspect ratio (as in 4×6 prints), the Four Thirds image is cropped along the long edges, while for 4:3 aspect ratio, Four Thirds is uncropped but APS-C or "full-frame" 35mm ...


5

The Aspect ratio (image) Wikipedia entry has some answers to this question. From that article, many aspect ratios derive from the 35mm film, the image size in number of perforations of that film and whether room has to be left for soundtrack.


5

The standard for still photography has generally been 3:2 since that is the standard for 35mm film, which has continued into most DSLR systems. One notable exception to this is the Micro four-thirds system that has gone to a 4:3 native aspect ratio. As everything goes digital, that is beginning to change because 16:9 and 4:3 are common lcd monitor aspect ...


5

I think the answer here is that your picture frame is stretching the image to fill the frame, regardless of aspect ratio. This is obviously terrible behavior and hopefully there is an option to turn it off. It probably does this in order to prevent complaints about black bars on the sides of the image. One sees the same thing at bars — a fancy wide-screen ...


5

As the sensor is 3:2 that's the natural size to choose when shooting. Cropping can be done in post, where you have any option you want. If you crop when you shoot you waste pixels. In my experience it is best to crop later if possible and to capture as much as possible - sometimes you find a composition ( framing ) in post you were not expecting when you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible