Serene Life

by garik

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27

It sounds like you're doing almost everything right, but there's one detail that caught my attention: Aperture highest the lens offers. I'm assuming that this means that you are stopping the lens all the way down. You shouldn't do that, because the small aperture results in a less sharp image overall due to diffraction. See What is a "diffraction ...


26

There is a good book which indeed does talk about photographing a canvas. It is the first book I would recommend someone who wants to learn about lighting. It is called Light: Science and Magic. (At this point: Anyone wants to have the previous edition of it? I think I'll get the new one. ;) ) The thing about the canvas is (I guess you have noticed so far ...


22

It depends very much on what you are trying to accomplish. There are at least 3 broad categories, which I'll try and give some examples. Note that my examples are probably US centric, but the services might also have foreign affiliates, I haven't looked into them all, so... Selling Prints to Clients Okay, so you've done a photo shoot with some clients, ...


18

When it comes to glass it's all about lighting direction. You want to make sure that when you look at the picture through the camera neither the reflection of the lightsource or anything lit by your lightsource is visible. Hold up, I'll draw a diagram: Glass and other shiny objects reflect light back in one direction (like a ball bouncing off a wall). ...


18

A quick Google search for "Christy Lee Rogers making of" returns enough information: The pictures are taken underwater From this interview The effects in my images are created naturally in-camera using the refraction of light and movement in different depths of water. Light has a lower optical density in the air, while light traveling in water ...


10

Your best bet for high quality images on a budget is to shoot several images of each canvass and have some panorama software assemble the images automatically on your PC. This will quickly turn your 18 megapixel images into 50+ megapixel images worthy of a medium format DSLR. You'll also be able to get away with the kit lens if you have enough light. If ...


9

First thing first: check the museum photography policy. It's usually available on the museum Website. Ususally, photography is permitted in the permanent collections but not in the temp exhibits. From the MET Website http://www.metmuseum.org/visit/tips/ Photography Still photography is permitted for private, noncommercial use only in the ...


9

If you want consistent exposures you should use manual mode. If you let the camera measure the light, it will compensate for lighter or darger colors and try to make the average of the scene standard gray. Alternatively you could use spot metering, and use a gray card in front of the artwork, so that the camera will only measure the light that falls on the ...


9

I agree with the comments about aperture, but also don't forget about mirror lockup and using a remote release (or the timer function) for the exposure.


8

ISO and Aperture are two totally different things. For your purposes, you need a greater depth of field (DOF), which means that you need to decrease the aperture diameter (higher f-number). Your ISO should be able to stay the same, assuming that you can increase the exposure time to compensate (this shouldn't be a problem if you are using a tripod). Using ...


8

I was at the Met last week actually. A few people suggested you bring a fast lens, and that's very true, especially since flash is not allowed (not that I have one on my camera anyway). So far the assumption is that you want to take picture of the art. I wasn't interested in that, there is just too much, and professionals are busy doing it much better than ...


7

That is a good camera but you really should get a macro lens. This will give you two advantages 1. a flat field with minimal distortion (important for photographing documents) 2. high resolution to get good quality images. Other important issues 1. Use a good, sturdy tripod. 2. Pay a lot of attention to lighting, this may be your most important issue. 3. ...


7

From the review it looks like while the Sigma is pleasantly clear of any weird distortions, it's not excellent in terms of resolution and color fringing. If you really want top quality I'd suggest to go with a true macro like Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 macro.


7

Right off the bat, you're going to want to have a fast lens, the faster the better. Light is going to be a major premium and having a fast lens will make a huge difference. Since wide open lenses can be soft, you can up your odds on a good outcome by going with a prime lens which is usually sharper than a zoom. Now, some of that depends on the camera you're ...


7

Avoid Glare Try to position yourself so that the lights aren't reflecting directly off the surface of the artwork and causing a hotspot in the image. A longer lens will make this easier than a wide angle lens. (This tip cribbed from Light: Science and Magic) (Good question, by the way :)


7

To photograph artwork, you'll need as flat and uniform a lighting setup as possible. Ideally, four lights from each corner to minimize any variation. You should use an incident meter to verify that the the light varies by no more than 1/4 stop across the artwork. You don't need to use softboxes - bare bulbs are sufficient, if placed far enough away to ...


6

I have this lens in the Nikon mount and compared to my other lenses, it's INCREDIBLY soft. I'm comparing this both to the 18-55mm kit lens and the Sigma 50mm 1.4. It's the lens I only use when I just have to have the reach. If I was getting it again - I wouldn't. At 300mm, its quite soft and the pictures lack contrast. Below 200mm, its significantly ...


6

You camera isn't holding you back. I would think that slide film would be even harder for you to use since the time it takes to get feedback on your results will be measured, mostly likely, in days, not seconds. I've photographed my gallery owner's (Katherine Baltivik) works for her to have printed so quality was of utmost importance. Here's what one looked ...


6

Benjamin, I want to encourage you to consider something different than pursuing only sharpness. That is continue with the different techniques already discussed, focus stacking, super resolution, etc. However, add to your tool belt two sets of other tools. I say this because of your statement "I'm getting great shots.. but I want to capture all the fine ...


5

I would suggest you very strongly consider the pros and cons of the microstock model before submitting your images there. Generally speaking, micro is a model that's much better for the consumers than the producers of content. If you'd prefer a more traditional stock photography model I would suggest you check out the Alamy agency: http://alamy.com/


4

The key to photographing this is about the angle of light(s) used to illuminate the surface of the art. It's all about angles and reflection and it's probably easier to illustrate this (pardon my poor Coreldraw skills). The dotted lines connecting the camera show the angles of direct reflection, so if the lighting is inside those lines, the glare will be ...


4

I think a 50mm 1.8 http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup/ef_50mm_f_1_8_ii would be ok for your work, considering that you have pieces that are up to 3m long you will need a long room to fit the painting with a 105mm lens. Also the 50mm is cheaper, sharp and you will have enough money left to invest in color management to ...


4

You'd be best off getting a medium telephoto to minimise distortion - upwards of 80mm I'd say, with a cropped sensor camera. Sigma make an excellent, sharp 105mm lens, the 105mm EX-DG Macro f/2.8, which is about £350-£400. You'd need to set up the camera a fair way back from the photo, but should get good results with this sort of focal length. Make sure ...


4

Another consideration is lighting. Traditionally you would use studio strobes set at 45 degree angles from the artwork with polarizing filters on both the lens and strobes, the polarizing filters should be adjusted to reduce the glare on the artwork (might require some testing). For the lens, some people prefer to use macro lenses as they are adjusted well ...


4

f/2.8 is NOT a fixed setting, it is the widest the aperture can open up. As you have found, closing it down a bit is usually a good thing. The kit lens has a max aperture of f/5.6 at 55mm, i.e. closest to the macro's focal length, which is two full stops down which gives a lot more depth of field automatically. What mode is the camera in? Av, Green-square ...


4

In this setting I find my slow, f/4 lens with stabilization much more useful that my fast f/1.2 glass. Paintings don't move, and the extra DOF is always useful.


4

And do ask permission before you even enter. Getting a written ok from someone at the ticket counter can prevent a lot of hassle with museum staff later on. Also be courteous towards both staff and other visitors. They have as much right to look at the works as you do, and if you're monopolising a gallery(or even a single important work) for 20 minutes ...


4

If you really want to maximize the sharpness and quality of your photos in tight spaces, you might want to look into a Tilt-Shift lens. Tilt/shift lenses give you the most control over focus, DOF, focal plane, amount of light and sharpness. With tilt, you control the plane of focus. If you are stuck in a tight spot, and can't get a piece of artwork properly ...


4

Based on your question, you're on the right track. Taking each item: Lighting: You'll generally want even diffused light across the entire painting. Unless you have a bit of experience with flash, this is easier to set up with continuous lighting because you can see the light as you make adjustments. Composition: Artwork is generally photographed head-on ...


4

Use the delayed shutter release (or a remote) will reduce any shake from touching the camera (which can still affect a camera on a tripod) and the mirror lockup which moves the mirror out of the way early again reducing any vibrations caused by the internal mirror moving during the shot. This may help along with the other advice about finding the sweet spot ...



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