Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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12

It is a good way to learn just how other photographers see, and a great way to get to know your gear to go out a try an make images that look like other photographers work. Many photographers do this (myself included( it's literally impossible to take the same image as someone else. Even in a group of photographers capturing the same scene, everyone will ...


11

Just do an image search with google on that url http://www.google.com/imghp and it will offer to search by image. Which results in: Best guess for this image: Saul Leiter and, following some of the results, the title "Lanesville, 1958".


10

You, my friend, are staring down the barrel of four years of art school! Not really... Though I do often recommend auditing an art history class to my own students and I've never seen a student that didn't improve as a photographer after taking one. But whether you take a formal class or not, you do need to become a student of art the same way you became a ...


7

Great question! There's a rich history of photographic images created without a camera. The best known type is the photogram which (according to a purist definition) involves placing objects in contact with unexposed film then exposing it to light to capture silhouette and/or refraction patterns. A famous practitioner of this technique was the early ...


6

I'm going to sound like a shill for Michael Freeman. But really, I think these two books are exactly what you're looking for: The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos The Photographer's Mind: Creative Thinking for Better Digital Photos


6

You have to learn how to express yourself through the subjects you capture, to have a story to tell or a point of view to deliver. You have to empathize with your subjects, to overcome your rational side and trust your intuition. You have to believe that you do have something worth showing the world, and then determine if the shots you take adequately ...


6

Shoot the details. The entire story of the building cannot be told by a wide angle shot. You look at the whole building, and you tell a story which everyone else can understand if they stand in front of it. You see, a postcard does the same. If you have actually walked into a historical building, see every detail of it, you "experienced" the place and its ...


5

Pigeon-holing lenses is not always a worthwhile exercise. Any lens can work in virtually any setting. Long lenses can be excellent in landscape situations, for example picking out and isolating a particular feature. The long focal length also has the effect of compressing perspective. They can also be used in street photography, where the length allows you ...


5

It makes me so happy to see someone ask this question. This might sound pretty artsy-fartsy, but my answer to "what should I be thinking about" is... nothing. Don't think about your image, try to feel it. Approach your photography not as a way of recording reality, but as if you were creating a painting. Go about creating your image as if it were on ...


4

I don't think there's a specific answer to this question because most other artistic disciplines can help your photography. Studying paintings or learning to paint yourself can allow you to see light and shadow in everyday scenes around you as well as teach you about classic composition techniques. So, I think painting is a great thing for a photographer ...


4

My favorite use of telephoto in landscape photography is compressing the scene. Matt explained this very nicely here. Actually, I really like landscape without the sky and using compression with a telephoto. Excellent examples of this here (photographs by Krzysztof Browko)


3

You may have heard this quote that is mistakenly attributed to Picasso: Good artist copy, great artists steal One way to interpret the first part of this quote is to treat it as a learning journey, that is in order to be good you must learn how other artists accomplish what they do by copying their methods. We can then expand on this by interpreting ...


3

One way of photographing without camera is to put the subject on a dark surface and leave it in strong light (e.g. sunlight) to bleach the uncovered material. A similar approach bordering with tattoo art is to put the object on your skin and get a tan. You could also use a magnifying glass to focus sunrays on paper and use it to burn dots and lines, ...


3

To some extent, as others have noted, "power" and "splendor" do mean different things to different people. But to some extent, we do mean more or less the same thing by them, or we wouldn't mostly use the same words to discuss what we mean. Here are a few composition tips that can give a sense of power or splendor. (1) Physical largeness speaks to power, ...


2

Very context dependant: Monochrome is often used to ennhance such effects. Add high contrast to monochrome. In some context poor focus or purposeful blurring assists. Maybe a funeral procession or drawing you in to be part of what is happening. Dim and dingy and sidelit and available light and high window and flickering candles etc etc etc .... all help ...


2

Power I think it is more about the context of the image. Take a look at any "most powerful images for year 20xx" and you will see the context and how it plays the part. For example, a little girl crying with the destructive path of a tornado in the background would evoke certain emotions from most people. Another example would be after the recent Haiti ...


2

A camera is essentially a light tight box with a means to let a controlled amount of light in on one end and a means to record that light on the other. A pinhole camera is nothing more than that at all, more elaborate cameras add mechanisms to exert more control over either the light and/or the recording medium. Photography without a camera has existed for ...


2

For exterior shots, especially in close quarters (tight European streets, crowds, etc) I highly recommend very wide angle lens. Your 16-35 is just barely enough, the 10-20 might be better. The trick is to get very close to an interesting object, and allow the rest of the architecture to be 'supporting cast' to the object. Interesting angles are also very ...


2

How near are the nearby buildings? With building exteriors, I've had good results with low-viewpoint wide-angle shots, with you crouching down or even laying on the ground. What's the lighting situation inside? You will likely be fighting against high contrast situations -- blown-out stained glass windows, but otherwise very dim interiors. For this, ...


2

Just for a while, try taking photos with something cheap and lo-fi, like a mobile phone or a second hand Olympus Trip 35, and experiment with black and white. You might find this liberating - you won't be thinking about technical quality, just the image content, and it'll be a chance to be more playful. I'm not suggesting you abandon all your lovely digital ...


2

I've heard of 2 exercises that sound strange, but will exercise your creative brain. The first I have done, and it sure helped me! Take a letter of something that looks like every letter of the alphabet, the only rule being it can't actually be that letter. Take a picture from as many different angles, light sources, etc, of a basketball as you can.


2

The way I see things being a "geek", "technophile" or other is not any sort of disadvantage when it comes to photography - don't let anyone tell you different or belittle you because you're from a technical background. Art and science are really two sides of the same coin and at the most fundamental level they have the same goals and maxims, they are both ...


2

I don't think you really need to master anything to be a photographer, or to take good pictures. Obviously knowing the technical stuff is really important, but mastery of it, isn't a requisite to producing amazing photographs. There are some virtues (not necessarily disciplines) that have helped me: Patience: taking a photograph requires you to sit back ...


2

The question tells the story of myself too ! I am too frustrated like you [after buying a dSLR and expecting that all the images will be superb]. When after switching to dSLR the images was still somewhat same like, I knew I have the problem with the view & it has nothing to do with the camera ! So after viewing a youtube video by Scott Kelby I try this ...


2

There are different ways your creativity can show. It isn't strictly necessary to be able to produce a unique look to be creative as a photographer. Much more important is the ability to understand how to communicate through your images. Your creativity doesn't have to communicate in style what it can communicate in content. Study the works of other ...


2

The title of this question is very loaded. Is it bad to mimic other photographers to compensate the lack of one's creative skills? The implication is that you are "compensating" for a lack of creativity. That's not a great way to think of it in my opinion. Let's re-word the question a little. Is it a good idea to try mimicking other ...


2

I've read this great advice somewhere (I think it was a book by David duChemin) that has really helped me: shoot what you love. It's one thing to explore all the different types of photography and mimic the others' work to learn the technical side of things. But only when you discover the subject that inspires you you'll be able to create original work. What ...


1

I quite like the 'Helsinki Bus Station Theory' to finding your own vision in photography. It's a fun theory and a good read, so would suggest you read it in full (it's not even very long). Without repeating the article itself though, the basic premise is that you have to start out doing exactly what countless people have done before you. You will go through ...


1

They're good for isolating your subject with a narrow depth of field as Dylansq has already pointed out. A 250mm lens at f/8 and focused to 10 feet away has a depth of field of about an inch and a half! So if you have a smallish subject that's only a couple feet away from its background you can use a long telephoto lens, fill the frame, and really blur ...


1

One of the most common uses for a high focal length telephoto lens is to provide a very selective field of focus. Telephoto lenses, when focused on a subject in the foreground, much of the background will be extremely out of focus, providing a sort of artistic effect. This is amplified with a small f-number.



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