Antarctica

Antarctica
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New answers tagged

0

Look at the camera instructions at the section that explains how to clean the sensor. As the first step, you don't need to clean it, but take a look. Strong pointed light source would be useful and if you have one of those rubber balls for lens and sensor cleaning, you can blow some air to the chamber to see if you can move it or even blow out. Nice picture ...


2

It’s out-of-focus images of lint resting atop the protective cover glass that protects the image sensor. All you need to do is use a camel’s hair brush, preferably one what has a bellows that blows air as it sweeps. Worst case, clean per you camera’s instruction manual. addendum: The shadows of stuff on the senor cover likely goes unnoticed unless the ...


4

It looks like you have some pretty bad dust on your sensor. I'm guessing that based on how deep your depth of field is, it's something that comes out with smaller f/stops.


5

It's an odd pattern, but faint shapes like that generally indicate something on the sensor. Dust is most common, but that usually looks like a somewhat blurred roundish spot. The branching threads here make me think this might be fungus, which is generally bad news. Prague isn't particularly humid, but perhaps you were in a damp situation at some point. I ...


-2

It could also be sensor dust, I got mine cleaned to avoid such spots in long exposure, high aperture shots.


3

When you turn down the highlights and turn up the shadows, a glow effect appears at the boundary of these two areas. What causes this? I don't mean to be flippant, but turning down the highlights and turning up the shadows causes it. I think what you really want to know is why doing that causes a "glow." I haven't looked into it beyond messing around with ...


0

It is likely a film of some type in your lens that has been streaked along a single axis. I've gotten similar effects after trying to wipe the moisture off the front of the lens when shooting in hot, humid conditions with a camera/lens that had just been in cooler conditions. I've also gotten similar effects after attempting to wipe a smudge off the lens and ...


3

Yes — it looks the same to me. Likely to be caused by a smear on the front of your lens (or on a protective covering of some type). In fact, it's so similar I've marked this as a duplicate of the previous questions, as there's no real point in explaining the details twice.


0

The camera flash cast hard sharp shadows because the flash is located close to the camera lens and the result is straight on lighting. Because of the close proximity, flash to lens, the shadows cast are a thin line. The shadows are underexposed and void of detail. The countermeasure is use a second “fill-flash” or a reflector. Such a lash-up is adjusted so ...


4

This happened because camera applied surplus of sharpening. Sharpening means for a computer to find a lightness transition and make the dark part of it darker and the lighter part lighter. If one applies disastrous amount of sharpening (as camera clearly did) artifacts are inevitable - the ligher part will become clipped white and the darker part will become ...



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