Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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35

Short answer So, not being quite satisfied, I did some research. Here's the tl;dr answer, but I hope you find the rest as interesting as I did. In painting and in photography, the "key" of an image is the overall tendency of its tone scheme towards brightness or darkness. When the key is bright, the image is high-key, and when it is dark, the image is ...


22

There are two parts to what makes a good photo: Is the photo technically correct? Is the photo interesting? The 2nd aspect can trump the 1st aspect, but the 1st will never trump the 2nd. Is the photo technically correct? Image Quality, Exposure, Focus, Sharpness, Contrast, (lack of) Distortion, (lack of) Aberrations all have to be correct. Is the ...


18

I think each process has equal merit, just based on my own experience of doing a Project 365. Doing that project, with an express goal of not being overly repetitive, I've had to do a lot of different things and that really means both taking and making pictures: Taking This, to me, is the art of seeing the moment and taking it. Perhaps the jargon doesn't ...


17

First off, what makes a "good photo" is something ultimately subjective, and its hard to say exactly. There are some guidelines that you can follow help you determine what a good photo are: A good photo: Makes effective use of light Photography is the art of "drawing with light" Photos: Greek for light Graphia: Greek for drawing Flat, total ...


17

ALERT ALERT rant warning I personally feel that an image hanging on a wall needs to be able to withstand three different viewing distances fairly well (1) too far (i.e. way past ideal--like 5 feet for a 4"x5" print) (2) ideal (3) with a magnifying glass. probably most images will handle 1 and 2 fine. Nearly anything hung in a gallery looks freaking ...


16

First one must contrast titles with captions. Titles are brief one liners that need not have any grammatical structure. Captions can be a short sentence of one or more lines, often also called a sub-title.. The terms are often used interchangeably but a photo can have just a title, just a caption or both. The purpose, in both cases is Firstly to ...


14

It's all about the reaction. Nothing else matters.


14

Not all photography is art, not because it's bad, but because it never meant to be. Some documentary photography may be art, but most isn't. Much photography is just decoration, or otherwise functional, not meant to be art, let alone upper-case-a Ahhrt, or Fine Art. "What is art?" is a constant question — in fact, it's a question with no fixed answer, but ...


13

A good photo is one that triggers an emotional response.


13

I am a believer in presenting art in the size and aspect ratio that best compliments it. I know that we are a world of standards, and there are some very common and readily available aspect ratios such as 3:2, 4:3, 4:5, 1:1. While a standard set of well-established formats makes it easy to produce printers and papers that meet the average persons needs in a ...


13

You mention that the images speak for themselves, well when you first look at them what exactly are they saying? That is the title. All photographers are trying to invoke an emotion of some type with their image, the title is often either a direct description of that emotion or additional text to help enforce the message. A good example is an image of a ...


12

Virtually impossible to pick a favorite-of-favorites, but City of Shadows, a series of long-exposure shots of St Petersburg, by Alexey Titarenko always comes to mind, this shot in particular:


11

Gregory Crewdson (more) For the surreal mood and feeling he can craft in a photograph with his controlled lighting mixed with 'in situ' lighting. That and the storytelling nature of the photographs that cause you to linger on the image, wondering what the subjects are doing... or have done.


11

Just do an image search with google on that url http://www.google.com/imghp and it will offer to search by image. Which results in: Best guess for this image: Saul Leiter and, following some of the results, the title "Lanesville, 1958".


11

Every photo tells a story. The story is more important than the technical quality of the photo. If the story is strong enough to move people, the photo is a keeper, regardless of its technical imperfections. And a technically perfect photo can be comletely devoid of any emotion. A powerfully evocative, techincally perfect photo, is when you have ...


11

Tokihiro Sato, I believe. A site with his work is here: http://photoarts.com/gallery/sato/satoexh.html The specific photograph you're referring to is http://photoarts.com/gallery/sato/87.html


10

I think the popularity of that image comes from its historical context. Up to then, the most highly regarded photographic work was black and white. Ansel Adams landscapes for example. Eggleston took images of everyday things, and in color. Reminds me of Andy Warhol, whom he seems to have been affiliated with. He seems to have influenced a lot of other ...


10

There are three examples I can think of: Shooting a portrait in bright sunlight. If you have a wide aperture lens, with something like F/1.4, and there is a lot of light, it could be that the fastest shutter speed of your camera (1/4000 or 1/8000 for example) is not sufficient. This means that the picture will be over-exposed, because you want to achieve a ...


9

Michael Kenna inspires me the most. You can see his work compilation here. There's a short documentary on his techniques. His work exudes sophistication through simplicity. You sense the solitude, the etherealness, and tranquility, as if you were in the scenes yourself. "Six Sticks" pictured above, is one of my favorites of his. I emailed him a while ...


8

One among many that's been hugely inspiring to me: Twin Cities Brightest He's got some really interesting light-painting work, much of which has interesting conceptual components to it, e.g. his "alien abductions" series, including this one: He also frequently shows how he does what he's doing, which is another way he's inspirational to me, e.g.: An ...


8

By definition, an awe-inspiring image makes me feel awed. If I felt something else, it would be that else-inspiring. If the quality issue is not part of artistic expression, the image just has to be that much stronger to evoke the feeling. For my 30th birthday, my father gave me a photo of us together when he was the same age. It was an awesome gift. Was ...


8

The reason you see photomontages, or as its often called photomanupulation, on photography sites is it is a form of artistic expression with photography. It is not painting, or drawing, or sculpting. Such works are always composed of photography, and even though they are not a single-shot image, neither are the myriads of HDR/Enfused photos which also litter ...


8

Developement of photography - from science to art There are two kinds of people in photography. Those who want to take photographs, and those who want to create art. When photography was young, there was only the first-mentioned people involved. It was not in the concept, that photographs could be used in art. Until such people, who also wanted to say ...


7

Great question but when I first read it this seemed like semantics (how wrong could I be?). Now as I read the answers I realise that there is a deeper process involved which is very akin to the De Bono Six Thinking Hats approach. In that approach you consciously don a certain kind of thinking hat. It means that you deliberately enter that thinking mode ...


7

For example you can see some guidelines on how to make technically correct and attractive photos..



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