Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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15

Sadly, the feature's name is misleading. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that it's wrong, if not an outright lie. Turning this option on just enables you to use exposure compensation — it doesn't let you do anything actually "manual". If you enable this option, the ... menu at the lower right of the screen gains a +/- icon, as typically indicates exposure ...


9

I've used Pocket Light Meter for the iPhone (like dpollitt :) when using my grandfather's old Leica IIIc, a 35mm rangefinder with no light meter or automatic metering. I played around with it quite a lot, comparing its results against those of my Canon 5DmkII's metering, and found it to be very accurate. The results from the Leica bore this out too: ...


8

Look at the channel for weather here. I get an email to my phone for various weather presets I made. https://ifttt.com


7

Disclosure: I'm the guy behind Cine Meter and Cine Meter II, so take what I say with a grain of salt, grin. Do these apps really work, or are they gimmicks? They really work, within the limits of what the built-in camera allows. They may not be able to measure really dim light, for example. Can they get the same information from a scene that a ...


6

The Photographers's Ephemeris With this, you can pick a location on a map, and the app will show you the times of sunrise/sunset (and moon), including the times and a graphical indication of where the sun/moon will rise/set on the map, so you can plan shots. This has been a windows app that is now available on Androis and soon on iOS. This may be the one ...


6

You could turn your device into a Wifi hotspot and then EyeFi can connect to the internet via your phone (or tablet). I don't have any experience with Eye Fi specifically, but presumably its programmed to scan for a list of known wifi hotspots. I would imagine you could program it to find your phone consistently and then once your device is enabled as a ...


5

It's actually far simpler than any of the answers posted so far! You don't need trigonometry, or field of view calculators at all, all you need is multiplication and division! Firstly (all else being equal) the size of your object in the image is directly proportional to the focal length (if you double the focal length you double the size). So if you know ...


5

TLDR: No because you need an additional variable, either the height of what the subject is that fills the frame or the distance at which you are focused (infinity doesn't work though). Long answer... To do this you can use simple trigonometry, but you would need to know either the current or desired distance to subject or the size of your subject ...


5

There are plenty of iPhone and Android apps collecting photo tips, including composition. I think they're all pretty lame so I'm not going to link to any of them. I don't think there's anything right now that actively analyzes a scene and gives advice, as if Scott Kelby were standing right next to you reading from the appropriate pages of one of his ...


5

I use Pocket Light Meter by Nuwaste Studios. It is free in the Apple iOS App Store. It lets me lock in my ISO, and Aperture, then it will calculate the shutter speed. I have used it against my Rangefinder and it seems to at least match up with the built in light meter from 40 years ago! I don't know how it compares to current gen DSLR light meters though. ...


4

Try a Google search for "how to watermark images android". I found this which seems like what you want: iWatermark for Android Secure and protect your photos. If you are a photographer or artist iWatermark works for you to by adding a visible personal text or graphic watermark. You could also take a look at some more involved options: ...


4

IPhones don't make better photos. They have a decent camera (as far as phone cameras go) but there are other phones with better cameras. There are tons of options for post-processing on both Android, Windows Phone and iOS that are better than the built in camera apps on any of the phones. Adobe even makes a mobile version of "Photoshop" though it's really ...


3

The latest Sony cameras include an Android subsystem used to run apps from the proprietary Sony PlayMemories Camera App Store (PMCA). We reverse engineered the installation process. This allows you to install custom Android apps on your camera. https://github.com/ma1co/Sony-PMCA-RE


3

All of these relate to iPhone: The Photographers Ephemeris is absolutely fantastic but pricey (you can access it on your computer for free). Alternatively there is Sun Seeker which is similar but less expensive or free depending on the version you go for. These apps can be used for working out the sun and moon positions and related times. I don't use it ...


3

Pretty much all you can ask for is: 1.DOF calculator 2.Exposure meter 3.Remote control of DSLR 4.Photographer's ephemeris Those are the main categories of useful apps that add to DSLR photography. I understand what mattdm is saying, and I think we do have more specific questions about the mobile platform specific offerings - but you seem to be asking ...


3

The Photographers's Ephemeris (as others have mentioned) is very powerful and a great app, useful for getting you into rough position for a shoot at the right time and place. However I find some astronomy apps can be useful also to fine-tune exactly where you are positioned in relation to a sun or moon soon to rise (or to set). Hidden Sky is one, you can ...


3

MapAPic Location Scout is good for remembering locations. After you add some locations, you can tag them, search, get directions, add additional pictures to the locations, and more. UPDATE: As of June 2013, MapAPic can read geo-location exif data from images, and create new locations using that data!


3

I came across many choices when searching and I have listed them below. I chose Easy Release due to several reasons one of which is was designed by a professional photographer. Also when researching individual programs I found many, many positive reviews for Easy Release. The rest had mixed reviews if any at all. All listed work with iOS and some have ...


3

The answer is a little complex. I'm hotlinking an image from this site: https://filterforge.com/features/version4/groups-and-instancing.html That is a good program to make your own filters. The idea is that you have a basic set of basic "nodes". For example one can be a blur, another one that modifies the saturation and another one that controls ...


2

I have seen pros that use Easy Release. The fact that they are using their signature in the application is usually enough. I would have a hard time seeing it not hold up in court. I write software for healthcare and faxes are still common. They are signed in almost the same manner using digitized signatures. These hold up to HIPPA regulations so a model ...


2

For extreme weather conditions (rain, really hot, really cold, snow) you can set up weather.com to send you text messages about it. http://www.weather.com/mobile/customtextmessaging.html


2

There is a portal, where you can select it as ILCE-7(R). It shows some 20 apps, and one of them (E 9,99) does time lapses. It is possible to develop in-cam apps too but I can't find a link so quickly. Maybe that requires an account first.


1

When I want to do this I use the Messages app on the Mac to send it to myself using my phone number. The photo then appears on my phone in an iMessage, which I can then save straight to the camera roll. This works both ways too, so you can send photos from your iPhone back to your Mac.


1

I don't know if this works completely but another solution could be using a tool such as an Exif Viewer like that. You download the image from your phone to a computer and upload it to that or as another person said, view that on your personal computer. I don't know if this will give the exact camera, this can vary on how the phone/camera generates the data ...


1

Silly me, I have not googled enough. This is the link to sony camera dev, https://developer.sony.com/develop/cameras/ at the bottom of the page is interesting line: Sony engineers scan Stack Overflow daily for new questions.


1

I'm not sure if it's what you are looking for because I don't quite understand your question, but have you looked at Triggertrap? http://triggertrap.com/products/apps/mobile/


1

I would not trust or recommend an app-based light meter. 3 reasons: All on-phone cameras differ, so calibration would be nearly impossible. Phone cameras degrade (dust, scratches finger prints etc) which would effect accuracy. It would not be able to meter incident light. Also if you are shooting film (which TBH is the only reason you'd need a light ...


1

A lot of people like Squarespace and SmugMug to host their galleries/portfolios (and they have some capabilities for sales). DeviantArt, 500px, and 1x are places for sharing images and having them rated/reviewed by others and can help get some exposure (as well as sales). Snapsation may be something you're looking for, though I don't know how much it gets ...


1

Post-Processing Apps iOS SnapSeed Aviary Filterstorm Android Aviary WP7 Aviary Camera Replacement Apps iOS iPhoto (iPhone & iPad) Hueless Camera+ Camera Awesome Android add some here! WP7 add some here! Social iOS instagram Android instagram WP7 add some here! Specialty / Effects iOS 360 AutoStitch ...


1

I don't know if this is what you want but the built in Photos app on iPhone can show you on a map all the locations of previously taken photos. Just tap "Places" along the bottom navigation bar of the Photos app. (On the right, next to Albums and Photo Stream).



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