Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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10

No. This is a concept camera, which means someone — in this case, not even anyone affiliated with Apple — makes a digital mockup and describes how the product would theoretically work and act. It's not real. Often such ideas have no relation to what could be engineered in reality, since they're not fettered by the constraints of reality — size, cost, ...


9

It depends a lot on what you want to do with it, and hence what your criteria are for "best", but I've used a few so here are my opinions: Photoshop Express: 2/5 [US link] Free, nice interface and easy to use, but features are limited to basic corrections, effects and frames. Sharing to other services is very poor: just Facebook and a Photoshop Express ...


5

Instead of hunting down perfect solution with bunch of different software Why don't you: Install Lightroom on both systems (call Adobe about PC/MAC user licensing, not exactly sure if they will let you use your license on different OS, download trial versions for each OS and use your serial number on both, see if that works, if not call and complain) ...


5

Command line solution In your terminal try to run this command: sips -s format tiff /Path/To/Image/bla.CR2 --out bla.tiff Now you can easily create a Shell Script and do your batch conversion. Credits to this solution goes to this comment. Automator solution I came up with another solution that utilize the very nice feature of Mac OS X: Automator! ...


4

If you are interested in this, I would suggest getting 'dcraw' which is a command line RAW converter. There is a Mac version for download from the site, the source code, and if you have HomeBrew installed, you can install it via 'brew install dcraw'. The 'dcraw' program allows you to specify a variety of options including the Gamma and Exposure level ...


4

Yup, it's not real as mattdm points out. I can't see it ever being made either, as as a concept, it is fatally flawed (aside from the fact that some people will buy anything made by Apple). The concept is a camera that uses the iPhone for its brains, yet has its own controls, sensor, and even an LCD screen on the front, so must have its own 'brains' anyway, ...


4

I think the Photoshop mobile app is going to be one of the better options.


4

In the iOS 10.0 release notes, there are two mentions of RAW images: The new AVCapturePhotoOutput class provides a unified pipeline for all photography workflows, enabling more sophisticated control and monitoring of the entire capture process and including support for new features such as Live Photos and RAW format capture. You should transition to ...


4

Yes, you can do it several ways. With the image selected: Pull down the Image menu, then say Duplicate 1 Photo. ⌘-D Right-click or Ctrl-click the photo, then say "Duplicate 1 photo" None of these methods make a copy of the original file on disk, a fact you can verify by subsequently saying File → Show Referenced File in Finder. No matter whether you ...


4

Try a Google search for "how to watermark images android". I found this which seems like what you want: iWatermark for Android Secure and protect your photos. If you are a photographer or artist iWatermark works for you to by adding a visible personal text or graphic watermark. You could also take a look at some more involved options: http://xjaphx....


4

You are wanting to compare apples to oranges. DSLRs us a separate autofocus sensor to do Phase Detection Auto Focus so that the mirror can remain down and the scene can remain visible in the viewfinder during focusing. PDAF uses light from opposite edges of the lens to measure the distance to the subject using the same principles as stereoscopic ...


3

The MacOS X feature that's responsible for showing you previews in Finder, Spotlight, standard file dialogs, etc., is called QuickLook. QuickLook needs an importer for each type of file that you'd like to preview. For standard types like text files, JPEG and PNG images, sounds, and others, the system has built-in QuickLook importers. In other cases, ...


3

You can create a "watched" folder in OS X using Automator, Folder Actions or with an app like Hazel There are examples on the Mac Automation blog. You can then set that to import to iPhoto or Aperture.


3

I think (I'm not sure though) there is no built-in command line tools for such task. Instead, you can use third party softwares. Allow me to introduce you to very nice ImageMagick. It is a set of cross-platform command-line tools that allow you to do a lot. It has lots of tools and also many scripts based on it are available online. They have also a forum ...


2

I've always been quite happy with the results from HDRtist. It's a very simple, free app with not a lot of configuration options, but it produces punchy, saturated images. It is by no means a replacement for Photomatix or any professional piece of software, but it does a decent job for shots that are just going to be posted to the web. Another option is ...


2

So, the short answer if you're editing and saving from Snapseed is yes. There are a couple of reasons why this will result in reduction of quality: You've discarded data from RAW to PNG/JPG in the first place. This now gives less information for Snapseed to work with and so further edits could result in even less data, especially in the shadows and ...


2

According to Chipworks photos, iPhone 6 camera has about 50000 phase detection pixels. These are only individual pixels, and as explained by Michael, they do not compare directly to the DSLR autofocus points. But the next generation of sensors changes the game again (mirrorless, mobile, but also DSLR in liveview mode, see Canon's or Samsung's Dual Pixel ...


2

A quick google search reveals no hard information but something like this: "The lens modules themselves bear no such identification, but Taiwanese manufacturers Largan Precision and Genius Electronic Optical have been named as suppliers for the iPhone 4, 4S and 5 -- with the iPhone 5 manifests also listing Japanese optical manufacturer Kantatsu." - http://...


2

Since you asked why: the reason for this is that the files on the camera are stored using a very simple filesystem using 8.3 file names, which by default are upper-case (originally these filesystems didn't distinguish between upper and lower case in filenames). There's an option in Linux (shortname=lower) that can be used when mounting the USB storage which ...


2

Renaming file do not change the content of the file. So you should not be afraid of this. Renaming of the file is operation, related to the metainformation of your picture, stored in the filesystem and it is not related to the content of the file itself


2

If you backup the library without the new images you would lose all of the new working copies of the images. That is how referenced images in iPhoto works. I would recommend against doing anything but backing up the entire 20GB library file unless you want to lose your changes. A better option is really to attack the actual issue here. A single iPhoto ...


1

You will need to jailbreak your iPad in order to do this. Apple, for whatever reason, doesn't allow anything but importing files into the Photos app, not arbitrarily. That's not the worst thing — the photos will all be there. You'll just have to build your workflow around what Apple has decided, not necessarily devise your own scheme. Once the photos are ...


1

if you look in the sips-Manpage there is no way to force exporting of 8 or 16 bit. That's the answer: there is no way to do this with sips. Is there any reason for using sips, instead of Lightroom or Aperture, which have great batch modes too?


1

I cannot speak of iPhoto, because I have not used it much, but Lightroom (LR) does not require you to store multiple versions of images: in fact, one of the key principles in LR is that it does not touch the original image, but stores all changes/updates to an image in its own database. When loading an image another time, it then loads the original image and ...


1

There are some things to note about LED TVs. If it is edge lit, then the TV is going to have areas of relative brightness that will be inconsistent with the actual image and no amount of calibration will account for this. If it is directly LED back lit then you should be ok using 1920 by 1080 resolution for a 1080p display. You will also need to turn off ...


1

LR will lose the connection, but by manually going through your catalog and right-click each directory (Find Missing Folder, if I remember correctly) you can point LR to the new location.


1

Lightroom edits exist in the Lightroom catalog*, the image themselves are untouched. Edits can, optionally, also be recorded in XMP sidecar files, which are files associated with the RAW images and typically are stored in the same directory as the images. Where your Lightroom catalog exists is dependent on where you decided it should be, as Lightroom doesn'...


1

Try Google Snapseed. Here is dpreview's review of it: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/snapseed/ It has a very handy interface and a lot of features.



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