Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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22

Lightroom gives you a lot more control over the processing of your images. You can finely tune vignetting (add and remove), curves, sharpening, split-toning, adding clarity, removing chromatic aberrations, powerful noise reduction, de-warping (lens distortions and perspective) "selective editing" (e.g. change the saturation/luminance of one color only, or of ...


5

In addition to the answer @max provided, an important feature of Aperture and Lightroom offer, is non-destructive editing. Basically, Aperture and Lightroom never make changes to your original images, but store the steps made to achieve the changes. See it like a 'recipe' to produce the changes; Aperture and Lightroom apply that recipe 'real-time'. ...


5

You are probably working with RAW files. RAW files include a preview of the image rendered as the camera would have made a JPEG, which includes some sharpening applied. When you first load the image in a program like aperture, the preview JPEG is displayed until the RAW file can be processed. Since the RAW file has no sharpening applied, it appears to get ...


5

I'm using Aperture too. Here's is my far-from-perfect workflow. It works for me, but not always. My point is to start trashing as many shots as possible, and to keep only good or important ones, so later I can give more attention and time to a small, manageable, number of really good ones. Important: I'm using a managed aperture library, so I keep ...


4

I'm not sure why you awarded that answer. It's absolutely fixable easily with aperture. I've spent less than 5 minutes on this and already got decent result. This is your exposure -2EV: This is what I got to (different from above but it's even better imo): All I did was brush in levels set to: Followed by setting recovery to 0.14 (because some ...


3

Command line solution In your terminal try to run this command: sips -s format tiff /Path/To/Image/bla.CR2 --out bla.tiff Now you can easily create a Shell Script and do your batch conversion. Credits to this solution goes to this comment. Automator solution I came up with another solution that utilize the very nice feature of Mac OS X: Automator! ...


3

According to the Aperture camera compatibility list you should be able to shoot tethered with the original Canon 5D with Aperture 3.0.3 and higher. The camera should be set to PC Connect communication mode. On page 123 of the manual it is explained how to set the communication mode of the Canon 5D.


2

Good news, Aperture now supports Leica M Monochrom DNGs! Enjoy.


2

My problem turned out to be a bug, and Apple has fixed it. I found this in the release notes for Aperture 3.5: "Addresses an issue that could cause the black and white points in Curves to shift incorrectly when using the eyedropper tools." Cheers, folks!


2

So, sRGB IEC61966-2.1 is the standard sRGB color profile and the one that you want to be using. My understanding is that Camera RGB Profile happens on iPhoto import when the color profile isn't present in the image during the import. Other than the gamma (sRGB is 2.2, this is 1.8), the profiles are identical, but that a lot of devices and computers won't ...


2

I think the easiest thing to do, as you already mentioned is to move masters to the external drive. It helps if you keep the folder structure intact, it will help Aperture during the reconnect proces. So if you had something like ~/Pictures/masters/year/month/day, just move the masters folder to the new drive, Then in the Library tab click on Photos, hit ...


2

Yes! I'm doing this myself. The key is to make the right choice during import. One of the import settings is RAW + JPEG Pairs which give you five self-explaining options. Both (Use JPEG as Original) Both (RAW as Original) Both (Separate Originals) JPEG files only RAW files only If you choose one of the first two, you're JPEG+RAW pair will be treated as ...


2

The great thing about non-destructive photo editors such as Apple Aperture and Adobe Lightroom is that they do not make changes to the original photos. You are concerned about the corruption of the Aperture Library. The library contains references to the original photos which it calls masters. It also contains other data such as additional files derived ...


1

There is a program made for this called RawHide for Aperture. I have used it myself to convert albums full of low-importance pictures from RAW to JPEG. You can have it delete the originals automatically and replace them with JPEGs, or keep both; you can tag pictures you've operated on; and there are quite a few more options.


1

Last time I used Aperture, I went into my iPhoto/Aperture Library file. It appears as a package/single-file in Finder, but it's actually just a folder. Control-click or use Right-Click on a two button mouse (a.k.a. "Secondary Click," many ways to use this) and select "Show Package Contents. Through here you will be able to navigate to various folders with ...


1

I am using Aperture for all my images in Managed mode. I do have several libraries, one big archive library on my NAS and the current images on the default (around 100G of images) library on the local SSD. I regularly merge the new images from the default lib into the archive, after that I can also freely delete images in the default lib because I still have ...


1

You can address the possible corruption process by saving backups of the library, but really, the main issue you will encounter with one super huge catalog is performance. When there is more data to search through, it takes longer to search, but it also allows you to search through more images. The advantage of smaller projects is that they are fast, but ...


1

It sounds like for your needs you may be better off with Picasa. The main advantages that Lightroom and Aperture give you is that you have more complex options for cataloging and keywording your files. This adds a lot of complexity to the system though, so unless you need the added functionality of Aperture or Lightroom, then it's probably not worth the ...


1

Sort of, it is possible to open different Libraries with iPhoto, but you can not merge libraries (you need to use Aperture for that). The trick is to hold down the Option key as you start iPhoto, this will give you a small window where you can create a new library or open an existing library. This let you switch between iPhoto/Aperture libraries. More ...


1

This is actually a very useful function for saving time and space when used correctly. I personally shoot in JPEG most of the time, but when I'm really concerned about redundancy and/or flexibility in editing after the fact, I'll shoot RAW+JPEG. Here's where the workflow is important: Import JPEG only - This is much faster, and most often your photos ...


1

I don't usually use RAW+JPEG mode, but I can tell you that Aperture has a switch for having delete/rating commands affect everything currently selected, or only the specific item you're highlighting in a set of selected items. I asked a question on that topic here a year ago, and got some nice answers: in Aperture 3, how do I adjust one picture while ...


1

I normally make a first pass giving a quick 5 star rating to each photo. I do this without making any adjustments at all. If a photo is clearly no good at all, I mark it as a reject. I then look at how many photos I have marked at each star level and choose a number of stars to revisit based on this. To start my touch up, I look at the photos that meet ...


1

I'm using Aperture on a much slower machine: a 2007 iMac (Core 2 Duo with 4GB RAM). The Aperture library is on the internal hard drive, but the originals are on an external USB 2.0 hard disk. Performance isn't stellar, but acceptable. Sometimes it takes a tad longer to go to the next photo, and a few times it froze and I had to force quit it, but I don't ...


1

There are two approaches that work for this image: Go to Highlights/Shadows. Enter "150" as the highlights value (or drag it there by dragging over the number, not using the slider handle), probably also increase Mid Contrast to about 20. Brush in that adjustment on just the sign. This looks much like the negative exposure adjustment. Open Levels ...


1

Aperture < Preferences < Import < Standard Previews I began noticing the same issue. I work with social media nearly 100% of the time so I don't shoot in RAW that often because I need to generate decent photos quickly and get them online (my iPad data plan would hate me if I started uploading those file sizes too haha!). Following the above path ...


1

It can be done. It is not trivial. See this thread: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3280339 Note the reference to the applescript aperture document. Also in the replies further down some sample scripts. This question has been around for over a year. I'll take a kick at it with an incomplete answer. Rating is an aperture specific field. These ...


1

You could separate the files you want to backup vs not backup by making them managed vs referenced masters. Which way you separate them is up to you, but the idea is the managed masters would be inside the Aperture library, while the referenced masters are outside the Aperture library (in some arbitrary location of your choosing). The central idea is you can ...



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