Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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22

Lightroom gives you a lot more control over the processing of your images. You can finely tune vignetting (add and remove), curves, sharpening, split-toning, adding clarity, removing chromatic aberrations, powerful noise reduction, de-warping (lens distortions and perspective) "selective editing" (e.g. change the saturation/luminance of one color only, or of ...


20

Personally I much prefer Lightroom, though I suspect you'll find this argument goes on as long as the Mac vs PC or Canon vs Nikon debates. Lightroom is more expensive but has far more features, and (surprisingly) seems easier to use, but that may just be because I'm more used to it. The main advantage of Aperture is that it integrates with your other iLife ...


15

I cannot give an exhaustive answer for everything you could improve, but I think you have a problem I am frequently noticing in my own images: oversaturation. This is especially well visible in the third image - in my experience, dead reed does not have such a rich golden hue, especially on a cloudy winter day. Oversaturation happens frequently, because a) ...


13

I'm a Mac user with Lr, and I have my files structured how I want (YYYY/MMM/DD/). What I would say, though, is download the free trials of both applications, as they're both workflow management tools and have a fair degree of structure which they impose on you, and see which one suits your workflow best. You can get the free trials from here and here for Lr ...


13

Aperture will allow you leave the files in your own folder structure. I can't compare it with Lightroom as I use Aperture exclusively. Aperture stores all the meta data on a photograph in an Aperture Library folder. By default it will import masters into the library. However, when importing you are offered the choice of: import masters into library; ...


12

As a heavy Lightroom user, I can't recall any time where it has enforced any particular folder structure on disk. It has its own catalog where it stores metadata, original masters, and whatnot, but you can choose where to store that. When it comes to photos, I import wherever I choose. Particularly with Lightroom 3, you have some pretty rich options around ...


11

Having all the files in the one single container is easy when you want to move or copy your library to another system. Then there's just the library, nothing more. It's inconvenient however, if you want access to your files from other applications. I myself have all files in the single container, back from the days when I copied libraries back and forth ...


10

I have two suggestions: Apple has refurbished machines in their online store, that's a good way to get a discounted machine. You could take a look at Lightroom, it's the main competitor to Aperture, and has similar functionality, but it runs on Windows as well.


10

Are there any hidden advantages that I don't see in using DPP? It depends on whether or not you believe the 'Canon marketing pitch.' :-) The pitch is essentially that because Canon makes the software and the hardware, their RAW processing is better than the competitors will be. Having done side-by-side comparisons I can say this... In straight ...


9

Project: Contains distinct photos/videos. A given photo/video can't exist in multiple projects, if you drag a photo from a project to another project it moves that photo. Album: Contains photos/videos from any number of projects but can only contain one instance of any photo or video. Folder: Contains Projects and Albums. So, Project A can contain Photo1 ...


9

As both a computer scientist and a photographer, I can tell you that the benefits of a program like Lightroom, to me, far outweigh the risks. I've been using Lightroom since the 1.0 days because photoshop/imagej/gimp/etc were just not cutting it for me when I had 500+ images to edit in two hours or so. I should preface by saying that I don't fear ...


9

There is nothing wrong with your Aperture setup. RAW files are like film negatives, they need to be processed so they can be viewed/displayed as intended. Your camera does not show the RAW file when you press play and preview the image but rather a JPEG image that has been processed in-camera. This is known as a sidecar file. The software that came with ...


7

The amount of processing is always a matter of personal taste, you can see some people to prefer almost straight-from-the-camera images, while others apply significant contrast changes to achieve their typical look. So the matter of post-processing is always a matter of your personal taste (and of course how much do you want to go with what people around ...


7

It turns out that Automator has an Aperture "Extract Metadata" action that has access to all of the EXIF fields. I was able to solve my problem using a simple Automator workflow that performs the following steps: (Aperture) Get selected items (Aperture) Extract Metadata -- With the option for "Tabbed Text" output. (Text) New Text Document I have ...


7

You've accidentally turned on Onscreen Proofing, which is used to simulate the colors of a final output medium like CMYK ink on paper. Turn it off by going to the View menu and clicking Onscreen Proofing, or hitting Option-Shift-P


6

Yes you can preserve your directory structures in Lightroom, even though it is database driven. You can actually make it more robust by relying on keywords and renaming patterns to let Lightroom create reasonable and predictable directory structures. Here is a real world example; it is a bit arbitrary but works for me as a hybrid between a keyword-based and ...


6

As above, I'd suggest looking into Adobe Lightroom, which is a sort-of equivalent Photo process-management-library-workflow program. As a student, you'd qualify for a discount from Adobe on it, and it's also worth remembering that you can use the Apple store for education (or Higher Education for an even bigger saving) which will reduce the cost further if ...


6

I do a first quick pass looking for anything decent, even stuff that looks bad but can be possibly saved - I rate this all as one star. Then I work through those, quickly flipping through them and editing anything that interests me. Those I rate as two. After that I review all of the two stars and see if there's anything that really stands out, that is ...


6

I have tried Aperture on the same (low-end) machine with both 2GB of RAM and 8GB of RAM. The difference is huge; with 2GB it is unusable, with 8GB it is OK. So I would suggest that you first go through the memory upgrade and after that see if you still need more power. Edit: This is an old question, and hardware has advanced a lot in the recent years. ...


6

It's really fairly simple: there's a direct trade-off between color accuracy and apparent noise. To sense color, the sensor has a filter in front of each sensel. As it happens, the filter for the red channel cuts out the most light. This means when you're doing the conversion, you have to multiply the red channel by the largest factor1 to achieve a ...


6

The biggest step you could take is to commit to either Aperture or Lightroom. These applications are both trying to fill the same space in a photographer's workflow, and they each work best if they are the primary tool that you use. By committing to a single application for importing, organizing and processing your images, you will be able to put the full ...


5

One thing to consider when you have this kind of flat lighting and subdued colors is to go grayscale. Taking color out of the equation means you have the ability to control the contrast to enhance the textures and mood of the image without worrying about distorting the colors and worrying about the snow being too blue or yellow. Or, if you want to keep the ...


5

I used to be all LR2 until Aperture 3 came out and I've given LR3 vs Aperture 3 a long hard trial and wound up using Aperture 3. The main reason I decided on Aperture 3 is if I opened a RAW image in both editors and either did no (or minimal, ie exposure) adjustments and looked at the exported JPGs side by side I always liked the look of the jpg that came ...


5

Unfortunately there's currently no 'painless/seamless/automated' way to make the switch... What you will have to do to push from Lightroom to Aperture is as follows: In Lightroom select every RAW file you want to end up in Aperture. Select Metadata > Save Metadata to File (Or Command/CTRL + S). This will write an XMP file for each image. Drag and drop the ...


5

I've checked in both the Aperture help and in the Apple Aperture's Pro Book and there is no reference to focus points :-/ On my side, as I'm only using a manually selected single focus point, I've always seen a single red (thick) square which is my focus point. All others are thin white. See below: Could you show us a picture where you have the four ...


5

Yes! While a preset is going to adjust for a common average and will not be perfect in most cases, they can get you close, and can be seen as a starting point. Take for example a wedding photographer: To greatly simplify things, you could say that there are a few basic shots that you take very often: posed with flash lighting ceremony pictures with ...


5

Seems to me Aperture 3 does respect the WB settings of the camera. Shoot a scene with three different WB settings and you'll see three different results in Aperture previews. If you want to prove it further to yourself, or disprove my assertion, shoot with a manual WB and see if that passes through to your preview.


5

The reason camera makers bundle software with the camera is to cover those that are not using tools like Aperture or Photoshop. This isn't to suggest DPP is bad, not at all, but it's basically there to help the basic consumer do what they need to do after the image is off the camera. Canon, and other camera makers, are not expending the same effort into ...


5

They cleverly hid this functionality, to do what you want: Select Metadata menu -> Manage My Places Add your new 'My Place' Select the photos you want to geotag Select Metadata menu -> Assign location Pick from your remembered locations or use a new one Voila, and in the future you can just use steps 3-5 to assign that location to any further photos.


5

Open up any metadata search criteria, add in either EXIF or IPTC fields you want to search by (using the "Add Rule" dropdown), and indicate you want images where the EXIF/IPTC "is empty". An example for copyright:



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