Mist

by Jakub

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1

As Hugo says, the amount of effort required to get at the aperture blades varies hugely from lens to lens, with more modern lenses (i.e. autofocus) being typically somewhat more difficult than (for example) most large format lenses, which often don't even require tools. However, to answer your question directly you can often (depending on the lens) do a ...


4

Hoping I haven't misunderstood your question, it is as simple as this: Turn Dial on top left of Camera to “M” Press the “Q” button on the back of the camera Set ISO to auto Alternatively Turn Dial on top left of Camera to "M" Press the ISO Button on top of Camera and turn the top dial to the left until you reach "A" now you are free to set the ...


1

Go to The-digital-Picture.com, search for Canon 50mm f1.8 STM review, click on "Image Quality". This web page will let you see the images of a resolution chart as taken with the selected lens. You can choose what camera body, the focal length (if it's a zoom lens), the f-stop, and a different image will be shown. You can choose another lens on the right ...


0

Relative to your question about sensor size, sensor size does not matter. Illuminance is the light per unit area. For example, a hand held light meter only sees a very tiny area, but that reading is good for very tiny sensors or much larger sensors, like 8x10 inch sheet film.


4

The image brightness will be the same. The entrance pupil size does not matter for image brightness - what matters is only the F number (or more accurately, T number which is equal to the true f number divided by the square root of the transmission.) In a bit more detail: If you fix your field of view at 100deg and vary the sensor size, the focal length ...


4

The STM version replaces the II version. Optically, they are identical. However, the STM has several advantages: 7 rounded aperture blades vs. 5 non-rounded (no more pentagonal bokeh) Metal lens mount vs. plastic A much improved manual focus ring STM vs. Micro Motor (should be faster and much quieter) FTM (Full Time Manual) focusing 13.8" (350mm) MFD ...


0

I'm on my third nex now (NEX5, 5R and now NEX 6). when you are in aperture priority mode, some functions are automatic. Generally the camera would try to take pictures with a decent shutter speed to allow hand held pictures, which is how more than 90% of the pictures are taken. When you increase the aperture to more than double, your camera would have ...


1

Aperture is a bit of a misnomer; a hold-over from simpler times and simpler lens designs. What matters is the entrance pupil, or the apparent size of the aperture as viewed through the front (business end) of the lens. With a simple lens design (a double-Gauss or Tessar, for instance), the physical aperture and the entrance pupil are approximately the same ...


-2

Fixed maximum aperture lenses don't really have any advantage, and they never did. If you want an aperture that you can maintain throughout the entire zoom range you can just select one that is available at all zoom settings. An f/3.5-f/5.6 lens will stay at 5.6 no matter how much you zoom. Fixed maximum aperture basically come in two variations; High ...



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