Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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5

why a lens's aperture only shuts to its specified stop when the shutter release is pressed, instead of staying static at that stop constantly That's because a closed aperture would reduce the amount of light coming to your eye. The viewfinder would be dim. Try the preview button on a lens with a wide open aperture like f1.4 and an aperture setting of ...


11

Why is the Depth of Field Preview button necessary? With the lens wide open, as it normally is before you take the shot, you can't tell how much depth of field you'll get in the photograph. When you press the button, the lens is stopped down to the selected aperture letting you see the shot as it will be recorded, depth of field and all. For both ...


2

Auto Lighting Optimizer is one potential culprit, but it is pretty easy to rule that out. The Auto(Basic Zone) mode will default ALO to Standard, so just change your ALO setting to standard in Av and run a test. My guess is that your issue is actually the metering mode though. The Auto(Basic Zone) mode will use Evaluative Metering. Check to make sure your ...


1

This is not an answer to your question, but a suggestion for your setup. In order to help minimize any extra glare or reflections off of the front of your negatives or slides, try to block out the rest of the light table. Or, create some "gobos" (black absorption panels) out of dark construction paper, or black matte-painted foam board, and use them to ...


2

Note the minimum focal distance of the 18-55mm STM is 0,25m so this is part of the limitation on what you can shoot. Photozone indicates the maximum magnification is at 55mm, which is probably what you should use regardless of "sweet spot". Distortion, CA and vignetting are best at f8 and above and resolution at f8 is as good as you'll get across the ...


8

35mm to 55mm at f/5.6 to f/8.0 will get you great results with the EF-S 18-55mm STM. I really like SLR Gear's visual interactive graphs for checking out lens image quality at various focal lengths and aperture settings. SLR Gear Lab Test Results This is what a GREAT lens looks like, and below is what a CRAP lens looks like:


-2

Depth of Field: We adjust focus to a specific distance to obtain a sharp image. Practical experience reveals that objects before and after the distance focused upon, reproduce acceptably sharp. This zone of acceptable focus is what we call depth-of-field (DOF). What determines if an image is acceptable as to sharpness? The lens projects an image of the ...


3

"Focus Area" as you call it can also be called the Depth of Field. f/1.8 will always give a very narrow depth of field and would not be desirable for large groups of people. From 10 feet away only an area 1.68 feet would be in focus when using a 35mm lens on a crop camera body. Depth of Field calculations can be complex, and will always vary with the ...


0

All photographers should memorize the basic full "Stops" in exposure as expressed in shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Once you are familiar with them, any time you change one of the variables it is very easy to adjust one of the others to equal the same exposure. 1/30 1/60 1/125 1/250 1/500 1/1000 etc. (half or double is 1 full stop) f/1.4 f/2.0 f/2.8 ...


2

The result of using the lens on a crop body is the same as that of using it on a full-frame body and then cropping. To possibly clarify: A picture taken with 1/100s at 50mm/2.8 and ISO 100 on a crop body with have the field of view of a 75mm lens on an FF body, the exposure of an image taken at f/2.8 and ISO 100 on an FF body, the depth of field of an ...


-2

Getting the exposure spot-on is the key to the kingdom in photography. To accomplish this we regulate the amount of light energy projected by the lens and adjust the length of time this projected image is allowed to play on the surface of the digital sensor or film. Too much and the image will be washed out, too little and the image will be gloomy. Now ...


8

The same light will pass through the lens regardless of the type of camera to which it is attached. Less of that total amount of light will land on the smaller sensor. But exposure, when discussed in terms of varying sensor/film sizes, is not about the total amount of light falling on the sensor. It is about field density, or the amount of light falling on ...


9

The amount of light passed through the lens stays the same, the lens will still be a F/2.8 lens. Since the smaller sensor only crops out a different area from the illuminated circle, the exposure related properties of the image taking process will stay the same, regardless of the crop-factor.


1

Whether a zoom lens is constant aperture or variable aperture has first to do with the design, a secondly to do with mechanical factors like opening or closing a diaphragm. A zoom lens works by having some elements move to change the focal length. This works because of the equation for the focal length of a thick lens: (1) Phi = phi_1 + phi_2 - ...



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