Watching Over

by Vian Esterhuizen

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0

A correctly-functioning D lens set at the smallest aperture should operate just like your G lenses with the aperture in sub-command-dial mode. A few things to look at after you put f6 back at its usual setting: First, make sure the aperture ring is set at 22 and the aperture ring lock is engaged. (It's a little switch just below the 28mm 1:2.8D marking on ...


1

How can I know how many meters is in focus area? Lens markings In the days when cameras and lenses had manual controls, lenses used to have a handy guide to depth of focus ... At f32 everything from ~1.3 to ~7m should be in focus. Stop-down preview Most cameras display a viewfinder (or LCD) image of the scene at the maximum aperture so that what ...


2

There's only one plane of focus. Things further away or closer to the camera are out of focus. However, objects close to that plane of focus are not as blurry as objects far away from it. What you can do is to define a threshold of blurriness for yourself and thus derive an area around the plane of focus to be acceptable for you as "close enough to being in ...


3

I got a similar error of "f/0" after putting my 55-300mm lens on my D7000. I examines the small connecting needles at the rear end of the lens. The number of these needle heads varies depending on the type of lens — a 55-300 has 8 needle heads; a 18-200mm has 10. These serve as connectors from the lens to the camera body. They spring up and down upon ...


0

We can't tell you whether the difference in image quality is worth the price, because that's a personal decision based on your circumstances. What we can tell you is the advantages the EF-S 24mm will give you over your kit lens: A stop of aperture (the 18-55 has a maximum aperture of f/4.0 at 24mm). That's never something to be sniffed at. Physically much ...


1

Fotodiox is selling am "aperture control enabler" now that's designed to do this for macro reversed lenses. You could use it pointing the standard direction on a manual camera body if you got the right filter thread adapters, though it will mess up the flange-focal distance, so it's probably only useful if you're using a macro lens anyway or your image ...


-1

The apeture (F stop) is a fraction of the distance from the center of the lens to the film plane while focused on infinity. Therefore, in my opinion, this would not work for that reason.


1

I've seen a tip to use cutouts placed over the lens to give a shaped bocah. I have Cockin "filters" in a set that are the same thing, intended for vigentting. So, the effect you get will vary depending on the size of the cutout, the focal length, and the apeture used. Why not take a series of photos with different apertures and the same cutout and make ...


1

Have you checked the mechanical linkage on the body that controls aperture to see if it is bent? It is the tab on the left just inside the lens flange. even if the camera is not controlling the aperture, it may still attempt to use this linkage to estimate the position of the aperture set by the dial on the lens. Here's a closeup. the aperture control ...


2

I think what will happen is: incoming light sees a smaller aperture then that will diverge a bit when hitting the lens then that narrower beam hits the internal aperture then that arrives on the sensor. What you will have is: an improved aperture (but not that good as if you did it with the aperture blades) much narrower useable image (wasted sensor ...


0

I do not think you can do this. The only thing you will get is vignetting. The aperture in lens is located inside. Please check this article for more details


0

It's quite a bit of difference if you are shooting indoors or at night...which is why most people get it. For daylight in portraits it won't be as much. I'd rather have a 35mm 1.4 but it's way too expensive for me. I shoot on DX with a sigma 30mm 1.4 for a normal lens and a nikon 50mm 1.8g for portraits. If you are on FX, get the 50mm 1.4g and the 85 1.8g ...


5

All Nikon lenses (including D and G series) have a mechanical lever built into the lens that is moved by the camera body. No motor. The aperture ring is typically left locked at the highest aperture setting (say f/22) and aperture controlled by the dial on the body. Here is the lever on my 50mm 1.4G: As @Blrfl said, the only difference between D and G ...



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