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0

Actually, when the aperture is stated as "f/#", that is the aperture diameter measurement, where f is the focal length and # is the f-number. f-number = focal_length/aperture_diameter So, a 50mm lens at f/4 has an aperture opening diameter of 12.5mm. And a 100mm lens at f/4 has an aperture opening diameter of 25mm. This is why we prefer using the ...


1

The focal length is the actual focal length of the lens, but since you have a very small sensor, it is highly cropped compared to what you would get with a 35mm lens. Since the crop factor is 4.8, it is equivalent to a 29.28mm-146.4mm lens. The aperture is the range of maximum apertures, 1.8 on the wide end and 2.8 on the tight end. Again, crop factor ...


1

Focal length A 50 mm focal length is considered as 'normal' for a full frame camera, i.e. with a sensor that is 24 x 36mm. With a smaller sensor the focal length for a 'normal' lens is shorter. The G15 has a 7.6 x 5.7mm sensor, so a 'normal' lens would be 11mm. The 6.1-30.5mm lens has the same field of view as a 28-140mm lens would have on a camera with a ...


9

6.1-30.5mm is the actual focal length (zoom) range for the lens, but the sensor in the camera is much smaller than that in a dSLR or film camera, so the focal lengths are also smaller. The G15 uses a 1/1.7" format sensor, so its crop factor is roughly 4.5x. The spec to look for here, if you know how focal lengths translate to field of view (FOV) on film is ...


0

The original question is a bit unclear because the OP indicates wanting more information than provided, but not really why. For the EXIF details that are provided: F stop is important because it directly affects depth of field. Focal length is important because it indicates how much magnification the lens imparts compared to actual (human eye) view. ...


3

Like a lot of things that seem odd today, the f stop is a historical tradition. Early photographers, were manually setting their camera exposure, and in the very early days without the help of a light meter. They needed a way of expressing the light passing capacity of a lens in a way that was portable (you didn't need to learn a new set of numbers for ...


14

The f-stop is more directly relevant to photographers because it normalizes out the focal length. It then gives you a measure of how bright the image will be on the sensor relative to the scene brightness. For example, if a scene is well exposed with a 50 mm lens at f/8 and 1/200 second, then it will be well exposed with any other lens at f/8 and 1/200 ...


1

There are several online depth-of-field (DOF) calculators that you can use to gain some understanding and have some initial idea. E.g. see this.


0

Start by trying with as low of an aperture number as possible. If the depth of field is too shallow (can't get subject completely in focus), then try increasing it, but there is far more to getting the background blurry and the subject clear. You also want to use the longest focal length you can, be as close to the subject as you can and have the ...


2

There's not enough information here to answer, because we're missing several important things. First, does your film SLR have metering? If so, is it "through the lens metering"? If it is a recent camera (1980s or after), the answer is almost certainly "yes", which makes the answer to your question "just do what the camera's meter tells you". The next bit ...


2

The is uncommon yet occurs with several camera models. The smaller the aperture, the less distance the shutter needs to travel and so the faster it can go. This is most common with leaf shutters and cameras which use the aperture as shutter, meaning there is only one mechanism.


4

With a ideal 2x teleconverter, you will be 2 f-stops down from what the lens is set to. Think about the basic physics and this should be clear. A 2x teleconverter makes the dimension of anything in the image 2x larger. Something that would result in a 1x1 mm square with the bare lens results in a 2x2 mm square with the teleconverter. That 2x2 mm square ...


2

The SLR Magic Hyper Prime is lower than that at f/0.95, and Leica's Noctilux also offers f/0.95. And then there's the brand new IBELUX 40mm f/0.85. And if rental counts, you can rent the Zeiss f/0.7 lens made for NASA and famously used by Stanley Kubrick - but only attached to a specific camera. That's often claimed to be the largest practically usable ...


2

The effective maximum aperture will be F/3.6. You can stop down from there to F/22 which will be equivalent to F/44. The camera will get the same amount of light as F/3.6 to autofocus since that is done wide-open.


1

This is called vignetting, it is caused by light being blocked from reaching that part of the frame that hits other parts. It can have a number of different causes, however common causes are the geometry of the lens itself resulting in light falloff near the edges, filters attached to the lens blocking some light from reaching the corners and a lens hood ...


2

When an aperture is wide open the angle of the light that can enter from is wider, so the edge of the lens it's self blocks the light coming into the lens. By stopping the aperture down you make the hole the light has to pass through smaller. This in turn means the angle of light that can pass through is smaller and more focused and so removed the lens as ...


2

This called a vignet and is mostly caused in this strengh by a wide-angle-lens itself on wide angle focal length. The strengh vari from lens to lens. My Canon EF-S 18-135mm has the same "problem" on 18mm. My Sigma 17-50mm hasnĀ“t this "problem" so much. You can compensate/eliminate this effect by using post processing software like Lightroom or change to a ...



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