Red and Blue

by Gordon

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

You are correct in that a lower/wider aperture produces greater background blur. However, there are 3 things that help introduce more background blur - 1) the aperture setting, 2) subj-to-background distance, and 3) lens focal length. So, to get the most beneficial setting for background as possible, you would choose your lowest possible aperture, get the ...


-1

The big advantage of superzoom cameras is that you get a big zoom lens at a reasonable price. The downside is that the optical quality is often not that good. A superzoom lens may offer say 28mm wide angle to 1000mm zoom. 50mm is what the eye sees so 1000mm = 20 x magnification (i.e. objects will appear 20x nearer). Binocular optical quality can ...


2

These are video cameras, but the basic principle is the same as with still cameras: the FDR-AX100 has a much larger sensor. It is a 1" type, while the FDR-AX33 has 1/2.3" type sensor. (These formats are common in still cameras too, with the 1/2.3" size being prevalent in compact point and shoots and 1" becoming more common in higher-end compacts and a few ...


1

Nikon have free Nikon ViewNX-i: http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Imaging-Software/ViewNX-i.html


4

Your camera saves this information, which we call "metadata" (because it is data about the data captured in the photo itself — one level beyond, or meta), in every file. There are many utilities which can read and display this. I'm not aware of any software designed for photography which doesn't — that'd include Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, Picassa, and ...


0

At least on windows, you can see a lot of EXIF info in the file properties, details tab.


3

Once you take a photo, you can view Photo Information by clicking the Play button on the back of your D3200 and clicking the Arrow either up or down. More information can be found on page 98 of your manual. Aperture, Shutter speed, ISO, Focal Length, Focus Mode, Flash Mode, White Balance, and much more is all available via this menu.


3

(I think) Every digital photo has aditional data stored on it besides the image itself. That is called Exif data (Exchangeable image file format). A Dslr camera can shoot to a raw or jpg image file, and both formats include this data. Smartphones and compact cameras most likely shoot only in jpg, but it includes this information too. When you manipulate ...


1

There are many tools which can provide you this information: Lightroom, xnview, (probably) any graphic editor. Also any EXIF tool can provide you this info (check exiftool, its free and very good) P.S. For sure there is Nikon instrument, which can provide you such information, but I am not Nikon shooter :)


4

There are 14 points to the star. This points to one specific option of doing it in camera. The lens has 7 blades. The diffraction spikes formed by the lens form at two spots for each blade, one major one and one minor one 180 degrees from the major one. You will notice that every other star point is shorter than its neighbors. As I said, this points to ...


1

You could, in a REALLY amateur method pick up black paperboard and precisely cut out a circle in the center to obtain a smaller aperture, but of course this is a really rough way and no high quality at all can be expected. The cut paperboard, if it is thin enough and the outer circle is cutt precisely, can be placed inside the bottom of the lens between the ...


0

The lens does have not an aperture range from f/4.5 to f/6.3. when apertures are quoted for lenses, it's just the widest/maximum that they can go, as this has a big impact on the performance of the lens. There's no restriction (within reason) as to how small they can go (f/22, f/32 etc). With zoom lenses, it's normal that their maximum aperture will change ...


1

f/4.5 - f/6.3 is only the wide open aperture. It varies from f/4.5 at 50mm to f/6.3 at 500mm. You can select f/8 or f/11 or f/22 anytime you want at any focal length. At 50mm you can select f/4.5 but if you zoom to 500mm, the aperture will automatically jump to f/6.3 No you can't hurt the lens by selecting f/22. It is designed to operate that way.


1

To create a sort of analogy, let's consider a final, perfectly exposed photograph to be 100 litres of collected water, our camera, is the rainforest, and our camera's sensor, is a bunch of small buckets. We're going to play god here so we can control the environment (our camera) manually, and try to collect the rain using our buckets. Now, we have several ...


1

Light is either directly coming from its source or is being reflected by some object into the opening of your lens. The aperture controls how big that opening of the lens is. The shutter speed determines how long that opening is open. More precisely: for how long light going through the lens can reach the sensor. ISO determines how much light will result ...


3

You should also be able to see this same scale in the viewfinder. What that scale represents, in part, depends on what shooting mode your camera is in. If you are in an automated mode (Av/Tv/P/Auto, the scene modes, etc), then it acts as an exposure compensation scale. It is marked off in exposure values (EV), or stops. Dialing it to the + side of the ...


2

Even though the distance of various stars from your camera on Earth can vary by astronomical distances, they are all far enough away that the light from them enters your lens as collimated rays. This means you don't need much depth of field because the lens must be focused to precisely infinity for any and all of them to be in sharpest focus. The reason the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included