Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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0

Modern Pentax SLRs don't have stop-down aperture coupler on the body mount - mechanical linkage that links to lens aperture ring. Why? Because modern cameras communicate with the lens using electronic or digital signal protocol, thus rendering mechanical protocol unneeded. Because mechanical components have higher costs (more finely machined, moving parts) ...


2

It's an old question ( EG http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2714173 ). The short answer is that it is most advantageous for Video, because when you zoom in everything doesn't get darker. For single frame Photos you can adjust ISO and Shutter speed (the automatic Setting will do it for you) on a shot by shot basis and get all Photos similar; in a Video ...


5

The whole point of Tv mode is that you don't adjust the aperture; the camera meters the scene and calculates the aperture based on the selected shutter speed and ISO setting. If you want to adjust the aperture, use Av or M mode. You might also need a tripod if your shutter speed is consequently too slow to hand-hold. As to the "milky water", I think what ...


0

As the others have alluded to here, the aperture number (aka. f-stop) indicated on the physical aperture ring only indicates the effective aperture when focused in the non-macro range - i.e. at distances greater than perhaps 1 meter or so. The reason why the camera reports a narrower aperture than the lens setting is because of the effective lengthening of ...


0

That sounds like normal behavior for macros (and even some telephotos I've noticed). My Tokina 100mm does the same thing. As you get closer to your subject and focus closer to the lens the aperture will change.


1

Like most macro lenses, the f/2.8 aperture is only for large distances. As you get closer, the actual aperture of the lens changes. It's just how macro lenses work. http://www.kenrockwell.com/tokina/100mm-f28.htm under Falloff shows that this specific lens only does f/5.6 at 1:1.


1

In answer to your question about specific cameras, the only models I can recall seeing with an external aperture in front of the lens are a few of the oldest Kodak Autographics and Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras from approximately 1913-15 that featured a 'meniscus achromat' lens.. Here's an example of some.. When I first saw these, I assumed the front element ...


2

See textbook “Optics The Technique of Definition” by Arthur Cox 1945. Excerpts from: The fact that different parts of the lens of the glass is used when the stop is in front of the lens, from that that is used when the stop is ---- the aberrations are different ------ this is the utmost importance in establishing a lens constriction that will give good ...


1

You can try using polarizers on the light source and/or lens. You will need to determine experimentally if using crossed polarizers increases the contrast sufficiently.


0

The crop factor does not affect the aperture. The aperture is given by the phisical construction of the lens. The focal length and the pupil. f = focal length D = Diameter of the pupil Fnumber(N) = f/D No other variable is there. If you phisically affect the focal length, for example using a teleconverter then you do need to make adjustments to the ...


-1

l can only be brief, this is how I have done it: I took an old 2 megapixel pocket-sized digital camera, carefully stripped the objective lens and just replaced the original aperture which has a 3mm hole with a ultra thin brass shim of 0.05mm thick with a precise hole of 0.33mm at the center. As we know sensors do permit light fluctuations but will claim ...


-4

It's a business decision, because you can have very small apertures on cameras - yes as small as 0.33 mm or f/80 with absolute sharpness from 12 mm to infinity. I say so through experience. The only setback is that it needs 4x more exposure during the day time and is very difficult at night without a strong light and a steady hand. The diffraction of ...


0

As far as composition goes, the first photo has a lot of good things: diagonals, good color contrast, the dark head of the pigeon is framed by the light blue background, there are interesting shadows etc. The myna shot is a more interesting pose of the bird itself, but the background is distracting. The white walls at the edges draw the eye away from the ...


0

As Rafael has pointed out, the birds are not going to pose for your camera, so you got to take the shot quickly when they arrive. What you can try to do is exposure bracketing, usually the bird will be quite a bit darker than the background. The pictures should then be combined into a HDR picture using masking methods, because the bird will move a bit during ...


3

What you need to improve is your own analysis. The photos probably are ok for one reason, the birds are there and you probably have little time to take the shoot. Any change could mean that you loose the shoot. I feel it's perfect shot. But if you close your own doors and you are self-congratulatory you have reached your own peak. Michael Clark made ...



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