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by Bart Arondson

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36

I typically use aperture priority as well, but I also work a fair bit in manual mode. The typical case for me is if I am in an environment where the lighting situation is quite static, but the subject may have a lot of contrast. Here I switch to manual mode and shoot a few test frames to pinpoint the exposure (typically I try to spot meter on a white ...


30

The biggest benefit I can think of is consistency between shots. This is normally not much of an issue, but when you are wanting to capture the changing light in a scene for time lapse or do panorama stitching the consistency becomes really important.


16

They allow you to make different creative decisions. Take Av (aperture mode), if you are creating a portrait, you will likely want a large aperture for a flattering shallow depth of field, so maybe you set it to f2.8 and let the camera figure out the best shutter speed. However, if you want to create a landscape, you want most of the image in focus, so you ...


12

Aperture priority can be ideal for a walkaround mode, especially when combined with exposure compensation. I only tend to flip to manual mode when I'm shooting a lot with the same lighting, or rapidly changing lighting -- so things like food photography (where dark meat or glistening glazes can trick the metering), or fireworks where the automatic metering ...


11

Manual mode can give you more consistent metering when you're taking several photos in a scene. For example, suppose that you're photographing a person whose body is fully illuminated but whose face is partly in shade. If you take a full-body image and then a head and shoulders portrait, the metering could end up different because the percentage of the frame ...


11

What you are going wrong is not giving the camera enough latitude. You fixed the aperture and ISO, so all the camera can do is set the shutter-speed and flash power. It must be not as low-light as you think because most often you would get an under-exposed image doing what you are doing. The camera has a shutter-speed range it can use with the flash. The ...


11

Correct. As a matter of fact, on most cameras Program Shift is the same too by your logic. These modes, including Program, are designed to give you the same exposure which is why the results are the same since Aperture and Shutter-Speed are inversely related given a fixed ISO. The difference is what you decide on. Only you can decide if you would like a ...


9

If your subjects stay the same but your background changes in luminosity greatly. I was shooting sports indoor with a door to the outside open, so my subjects would have gotten real dark if they went by of the door. Also, if you want to maintain a certain shutter speed (freeze action) and aperture (for subject isolation), and you don't have TAv mode or ...


8

I prefer manual mode for a few areas: 1) stage fotografie. Usually, on stages the light has very high contrast. Any automatic mode most of the time will blow the faces because it is trying to get all the dark background to 18% grey. 2) panoramic fotos. Having inconsistent exposure for the frames is a real pain in stitching them together, so I'll use manual ...


8

Ok time to cut through a little of the confusion: Technically there should be no difference in exposure when using a smaller aperture in one of the automatic modes as the camera should vary the other parameters to compensate. You might see a difference in the extreme corners due to vignetting at wide apertures, but this would make the small aperture shot ...


8

Fortunately, it's not actually voodoo magic. You have set a fixed ISO of 400, and you're in aperture priority mode, which means you're choosing the aperture and not giving the camera control of that. That means the one variable the exposure program can change is shutter speed. When you tell it you want the exposure to be two stops darker, the only thing it ...


7

Sometimes the amount of exposure compensation available (ie +/- 2 stops) in Aperture priority mode might simply not be enough.


7

I can't speak for what a particular make/model does, but a camera shouldn't take IS into account when choosing a shutter speed. This is because the camera doesn't know if you're shooting a moving subject or not. If you're using a 24mm zoom with a three stop stabiliser the camera could potentially choose a shutter speed of 1/3s which would be fine for a ...


7

No, the camera does not take any image stabilization into account during metering. This makes sense since IS does not affect the exposure of the image, only mitigates blur. What you describe is a putative hand-held shutter speed priority, in which the shutter speed never drops below 1/f in seconds (f = focal length of lens in mm), corrected for benefits ...


7

To use aperture priority on Pentax dSLR with FA lens, you have to leave the aperture ring to "A" and select the aperture on body. With aperture ring in A mode, the FA lens will behave just like a DA lens. You can use Av mode and set aperture on the body, shutter time will be calculated according to automatically measured exposure. With aperture ring set ...


6

First, I don't know, which advantages of Av/Tv you don't know about. :-) For me, these modes are very useful, when I do not have time for full manual setting and I do not want to use full auto mode. Sometimes for example I need the camera not to choose shutter speed less than 1/250 (when I use my telephoto zoom) but I am sure, the camera will choose ...


6

In the AV mode the camera decides on the settings to achieve what it computes as the best exposure possibly subject to constraint on the maximum iso and on the shutter time. This computation is made according, among other things, to the evaluation mode (that is: the camera will compute the "ideal" exposure based only on the central part of the image, or on ...


6

Exposure compensation (for that is its name) allows you to adjust the exposure of a shot in the semi-automatic modes in situations where you think the light meter might be reporting 'incorrectly'. It essentially alters the zero-point of the light meter. Consider this situation. You are taking a shot of a man dressed in a light grey suit against a black ...


6

I think what you're saying is that the camera will pick the same total exposure in either mode. For example: Suppose you're in aperture priority mode with f/8 selected. The camera picks a shutter speed of 1/250 second. If you then switch to shutter priority mode and select a shutter speed of 1/250 second, you find that the camera picks an aperture of f/8. ...


6

You are essentially correct in a simple case. It is really simply a convenience thing, though it does make a difference when dealing with more than 2 parameters. Don't think of it in terms of what the computer is doing, but what the person is doing. If I want to have control of the depth of field for creative reasons, I will choose Av. If I happen to ...


6

So why are there two different modes or what's the difference between them? Because trying to control aperture by setting the shutter speed and trying to predict what aperture the camera will choose is impractical. When you're taking a portrait, for example, you might want to choose a specific aperture. You can adjust the shutter speed in Tv mode until ...


5

Reading through this article about the zone system (found from this answer) made me see how using the zone system would be useful and require manual mode. Basically using a spot meter (for me, the one built into the camera) to find the exposure for the part of the photo you want to appear with a particular brightness, and setting the exposure accordingly. ...


5

As well as the reasons of consistency between shots (either for high-contrast photos in fairly consistent lighting or for stitching shots together), I also use Manual when I'm using a flash indoors. Might be just due to lack of effort to learn how to shoot Av + flash on my part, but I find it much easier just setting it in full manual with f/4, 1/100 ISO ...


5

According to the Pentax K50 and K10D manuals, in P mode, if I select aperture, then program will choose a corresponding shutter speed, and if I specify shutter speed, then camera will select a corresponding aperture. Not entirely true. After reading the manual, you can't set values other than ISO. Av & Tv lets you set the aperture & shutter ...


4

The main reason I switch into manual mode is to create shots that I know aperture priority won't do. Silhouettes or intentionally over/under exposed shots for example. Aperture priority is great for 'normal' or 'properly exposed' shots, but not so great once you want to start experimenting a bit. A recent favourite of mine is a very high contrast ...


4

The advantage of aperture or shutter priority modes over manual is the same as any automation: when it works right, it takes labor out of our hands and makes life easier, allowing us to concentrate on other things. And on modern cameras, the automatic metering is pretty good — it basically does the right thing most of the time. And, if you get to know your ...


4

Aperture priority mode works just fine with a manual lens (or no lens at all) on my Canon 550D so I assume it will work on a 60D What happens is that the camera display shows an aperture of "F00" and the camera will set the shutter speed based on the amount of light it can see (making the result picture exactly the same as if you set the aperture in the ...


4

There are two reasons why a camera might choose to use a slower speed with flash than without: it tries to fit exposure into sync speed (1/250s on Canon 60D). and/or it chose lower auto ISO thanks to flash usage Usually, flash is only used to illuminate subject. Your camera still tries to make sure the background will be correctly exposed too.


4

The maximum aperture (minimum f stop) of your lens is different at different lenghts. For this reason, if you set up 3.5 at 20mm and then zoom to 80mm it will be automatically reduced to 5.6 (the maximum possible). If you set up an f stop high enough for your maximum focal, it will not change as you zoom: have you tried it in practice? What will change with ...


4

1) Yes & No. See pages 47-50 of your D3200 User Manual. You can select Fill flash, Red-eye reduction, Slow sync + red-eye, Slow sync, and Rear-curtain + slow sync while in A mode. All of these modes can automatically calculate the amount of flash power used to correctly expose the shot. The Auto (auto flash) mode that will determine if you need flash and ...



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