Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

33

I think, in general, you are considered a professional photographer if your primary source of income comes from your photographic work. For example, if you are a wedding photographer by trade, your job is to photograph weddings. You are a "professional" wedding photographer. The same would be true if you were a sports photographer, and sold your work to ...


28

Earthrise by Apollo 8 Astronaut William Anders - sounds like he was advocating that sometimes all the training or equipment doesn't make a photograph good, but sometimes a subject can be just THAT inspiring. Credit: NASA


25

My tips: Don't assume you're good because friends and family say your are. Don't start with weddings. Wait until you've done a few simpler things first (christenings / babies etc). You may be a great photographer when snapping flowers but how are your people skills / planning skills etc.? Try to sell some stock photos or prints in a market. Go for it! Just ...


23

It's a meaningless distinction. It depends on who's saying it, and what's "professional" to one venue might not be to another. In this case, it's pretty clear they won't let you bring in a DSLR, because it has a detachable "lense". Good luck educating them on the distinction between prime and zoom. I totally share your frustration. It's obvious from their ...


20

I am not a pro ... and I suspect I never will become one. The main reason is: I really enjoy taking photos ... but I don't enjoy HAVING to take photos. I learned this when I was taking photography classes at a local botanical garden. When I was just taking pictures of flowers, I loved it. But when I had to take pictures of flowers for the class, it ...


18

Ask your tax officials. They will have a very clear definition as to which category your activities and earnings belong. I have met amateurs that are some of the most accomplished photographers I know. I have met professionals that are inept. "Let me here call attention to one of the most universally popular mistakes that have to do with photography - ...


15

You are right, a wedding is hard to do. But it is not impossible and we all have to start somewhere. One of the biggest challenges is going to be staying ahead of the program and getting in the right spot at the right time. Much of wedding photography is being prepared for the "next shot", getting yourself positioned and close enough to the action, and ...


14

I did a wedding earlier this year, and having never done one before had the same fears as you. For me, the following points were very important: Talk to the bride & groom in advance. Discuss what they want from you out of the day. They are the MOST IMPORTANT thing for you to consider. They may ask for formal shots at the church, or informal shots at ...


14

To be honest, a good amateur takes the same or better than photos of a professional. It's 2010 so there's so much information available to the public, and with the falling prices of photography equipment there's really no difference between a good amateur and pro.


13

There are two questions: What makes a camera "professional", to a photographer? and What makes a camera "professional" to everyone else? In this case these people clearly don't know anything about photography as their definition of "professional" is based on pretty stupid criteria. For example: Detachable Zoom Lenses aren't allowed, so how about ...


13

Don't do it. The photography business is insanely competitive and it's extremely difficult to make a living. The hours are very long and the pay is bad. Laurence Kim, a pro wedding photographer, on the necessary gear ($4k recommended minimum): http://laurencekimblog.com/index.php?link=140 Ken Rockwell on going pro: ...


11

Wow, are you hosed. You tell them the price before you start. Its too late now. Traditionally, wedding photographers made all their money off prints. If you give them soft copies, you cut yourself out of that profit stream. Bay Area, NYC, Chicago, etc. I wouldn't consider doing a shoot unless I got at least $100 per hour for my time. Plus I'd want more to ...


10

This is a pretty complicated question, with a number of answers. First of all, I think you should be at the point where you are already making money from hobby photography - either through small product shoots, architectural stuff from craigslist, shooting friends small weddings, etc. Second, if you already have a job, and you are looking to replace it, ...


8

Extremely important for professionals. Most magazines publish photographs, not excuses. So if your camera gets attacked by a bear, falls into a lake, gets stolen, you still have to be able to bring back photos. Many events are once in a lifetime or occur extremely infrequently, which gives you only one chance to capture them. For amateurs there is ...


8

remember that at places like that, the "rules" are generally enforced by rentacops. So there isn't a lot of training and they can be widely varying depending on which door you go in. So expect ambiguity. Many times, it "it looks professional" to whoever looks at it, that's all that matters, and there's no real appeal channel. I've been involved in helping ...


8

I am somewhat surprised by all the answers that the OP is basically screwed. The lack of contract is a double edged sword, so the newlyweds have the same problems if they are not willing to pay a fair price for the pictures since they did not negotiate up front either. The OP may be able to walk away without giving them anything if they refuse to pay a ...


7

Do you have a business license? Do you market your work and solicit business? You're a pro. Do you sell an occasional image or print? Not a pro. I don't think it's about income; it's about intent. Are you putting time in on a regular basis on your photography business? Then, you're a pro. I just evaluated where I am in all of this and decided NOT to move ...


7

Professional: Short answer: Are you mad ? !!!!!!! [ :-) ] Longer answer: For a professional lack of a backup body is ~= "death-deferred". You could consider that "being able to access an alternative acceptably quickly at an acceptable cost" is the equivalent to having a backup body, so if you were a studio only photographer and there was a 24/7/365 ...


7

Rather than considering a whole new camera, as the S95 is a rather nice little thing, you could chuck a small tripod in your backpack for these shots. This would allow you to compose you shot with your wife and use the self timer for the photo. Gorillapods are tiny enough to go in your pocket and can grip onto benches, railings, or branches or you could ...


6

One approach would be to look at the top questions on this site, and to make sure those things are addressed in a helpful and organized way. You could even reuse the content from here, since all user contributions are licensed under the sharing-friendly Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. Translation into local languages is very much a part of ...


6

Here would be my topics How to Hold a Digital Camera How to buy the right equipment for you Composure - Some basic rules and how to break them Shutter/Aperture settings - How they affect your shot Depth of field Lighting and Exposure How to use flash What is ISO? How to pre-focus and use auto focus effectively An introduction to White Balance Lenses and ...


6

Most contests that have an amateur category clearly define what they consider the difference between pro and amateur to be. If you can't find it in the fine print of the contest rules, contact the organizers and ask them. Most of the ones I've looked at fall into three broad categories: A professional is a photographer who derives all or almost all of ...


5

It's a regular feature in several magazines, and occasionally these things happen by chance. For example, I bumped into Will Cheung when I was shooting this -- I'd taken this other shot and Will followed my lead and featured his copy of the photo in Photography Monthly a couple of months later. I was torn between being proud that he'd taken inspiration from ...


5

The distinction depends on the context, how you use use the words 'professional' and 'amateur' Used as a noun or compound noun Professional means an activity that is one's profession, i.e. carried out for reward Amateur means an activity outside one's profession Since the words are nouns in this context they do not describe the degree of excellence. ...


5

Take a spare of everything. Keep checking your settings, it's really easy to walk inside briefly, change ISO then go and shoot the rest of your outdoor photos at ISO 6400! Likewise you could be grabbing a few candids during the formal portraits and end up shooting the second half of them at f/1.8 Likewise check the results your getting to make sure your ...


5

So, looks like the photos had lights with different temperatures. Looks like a cool light source on the left and a warm light source on the right. A straightforward approach would be to take it into Lightroom and apply a gradient with a countering color to cool the colors down from the right or warm up the image from the left, so that you have an equalized ...


4

I've done almost the exact same kind of gig, but for my cousin. Now, knowing what I know now, I'll not be doing wedding photography as a line of work, but... She was happy, I wasn't as much. Anyways, from my experience: You will need a longer lens. I went with two bodies (both Pentax K-5s) with a 17-50 f/2.8 and a 70-200 f/2.8 as the lenses. I used them ...


4

Next time I'd move the models away from the background a bit - there are some harsh shadows in a few shots. Put more light on the backgrounds so they're white. And make sure you illuminate the product as much as you do the models' faces. The faces are pretty well lit, but the hats/scarves are not. In post processing, I'd blow out the background to pure ...


3

The professional case is fairly obvious, I would think. Photo shoots can be expensive and time consuming to set up. It could be limited location options, assistants, model availability, and more that is a factor here, but it boils down to the fact that a faulting camera with no back up means a lost shoot and that can be a lot of money. The other ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible