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7

If you are willing to do it the hard way, you can use standard black-and-white photographic printing paper and do a reversal processing on it. What that means is that you will be making a negative, but then making a direct positive from the negative without an additional imaging exposure (though there will be an additional exposure to light). It will ...


7

I find that the Wikipedia article on Photogravure gives a good detailed overview of the subject. An easier to follow and shorter version can be found in this description of the process. Here's the summary of the technique: Contact-print a positive onto a layer of gelatine sensitized in potassium dichromate. This hardens the exposed parts of the gelatine. ...


5

The following is probably not entirely accurate, but I will try to highlight what I think the main differences are. Also, keep in mind that most of the names used above are umbrella terms for whole families of processes that might differ significantly within one family. I think photogravure and circuit etching can be seen as somewhat similar with respect to ...


4

Alternative Photography, which is on Google's first page, is still one of the best resources I know of for alt-process photography, so I'll recommend it anyway: http://www.alternativephotography.com/wp/processes/wetplate/the-wetplate-collodion-process The forums at f295.org are low-traffic, but generally helpful and knowledeable, and don't show up for the ...


4

Most modern large-format plotters used by specialist print companies can print on a variety of surfaces, including canvas, acetate, and Tyvek. I would think your best option is to print onto acetate (transparency) and fix that to the canvas board somehow, perhaps on top of or embedded in the resin you mentioned.


3

A good tutorial on making digital negatives using The Gimp. A free image editing software platform. http://www.alternativephotography.com/wp/negatives/digital-negatives-gimp You can make them on your computer and then print using any printer you have. Not sure why you mention your printer? Maybe some printers have this option built in?


2

Panda Photographic Lab, Seattle Panda handles: Roll film in B&W, C-41, and E-6. Cross processing, push/pull, etc. all fine. B&W Sheet film (4x5" through 8x10") "SOON" (see edit) TO ADD: E-6 sheet film (4x5", at least) (Should be online c. January 2011? edit: As of January 2012, it's still not online, but they're still claiming to be working on ...


2

As near as I can tell, "tactile photography" is a very, very limited artistic style with only a couple of instances of it being used. In it, a photograph is printed on a raised relief surface so that a blind person could feel the image. What you need to be able to do it depends on how you want to go about it. At a minimum, you would need a method of ...


2

Cross processing (running an E6 film in C41 chemistry) results in different colors based on both the film and the chemistry used to process it. Films are generally known to more-often-than-not shift to one color. Velvia shifts red, Elite Chrome shifts green, etc. But, the intensity of those shifts often depends on the chemistry. The camera has very little to ...


1

My question essentially is: the dyes that are in photographic film are just different chemicals that react to the silver bromide complex during development. Undeveloped film does not contain dyes. It contains couplers. When the film is developed, the couplers react with the developer agent from the developer and dye is created. This is only happening ...


1

There is nothing "conventional" about cross processing. Cross processing is the deliberate processing of a film in a chemical process for which it was not designed. The most common types of cross processing are : Processing color negative films with the E6 process Processing color reversal films with the C41 process Processing color negative film in E6 ...


1

Esten is right. As I'm developing film at home I noticed, that for example the chemistry changes color during development of the Agfaphoto Precisia CT 100 to purple. The film base layer itself is also purple after developing. Inverting purple gives green - the typical green color shift of cross processing this film. It looks like the C-41 chemistry is not ...


1

You can also use standard black and white paper and then contact print it. It's similar to reversal processing but you don't need more chemicals other than stop and develop, it has the side effect of mirroring the image.


1

Picture Perfect 2400-A Juan Tabo Blvd NE Albuquerque, NM (505) 299-9594 120/220 & 35mm color and black & white film processing Film and Transparency Scanning (any size) Bulk Scanning Digital film restoration See the website for more services and mail-order instructions: www.pixperf.net


1

BWC Photo Imaging (4930 Maple Ave, Dallas, Texas) Pretty much everything, including black and white and E6 4x5, 120, and 8x10. Great place.


1

Peak Imaging International - United Kingdom E6, C41 and B&W from 35mm, 120 roll film, 5x4 and 10x8 Mailing Address Peak Imaging FREEPOST RLSY-YZJX-SLXC Sheffield S20 3PP Phone +44 114 224 3207


1

Citizen's Photo, in Portland Oregon, does C-41, and E-6 from 35mm through 8x10", and B&W from 35mm to 4x5". Location: 706 SE 6th. Portland, Oregon 97214 Phone: Phone: (503) 232-8501 Fax (503) 233-4037 Toll Free (1-800) 221-3267 Mailing address (?): I'm not sure when you'd use this address versus the other... I'll try to find out and update this ...



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