Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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7

The principal difference is that some adjustments in Camera Raw are applied before demosaicing / conversion to destination colourspace & bitdepth. Such adjustments can't be replicated readily in Photoshop. Additionally the range and behaviour of adjustments is different between Camera Raw and Photoshop, some have migrated across (e.g. fill light) but ...


6

Don't worry that the D5100 isn't listed. The picture controls can be downloaded for use by the software (View NX2) or to be uploaded onto the camera. You're only interested in making them available for View NX2, so don't need to worry about the camera model. If you haven't selected another Picture Control setting in your D5100 menu, it will have defaulted ...


5

Anything you do in Camera Raw is non-destructive. It will save the changes in an XMP file so that adjustments are applied when you view the file and edit it. But you can manually undo them anytime you want. The easiest way is to simply delete the XMP file. Or you can open the raw file in ACR and undo the changes. For example, select the crop tool, then ...


5

Resize and then sharpen is the answer. It is commonly said that sharpening should be the last step. This make sense because you do not want to stretch the effects of sharpening. Sure you could do more complicated things but the lest steps are applied the less change there will be of seeing artifacts in the final image.


5

The basic problem with taking photos underwater is that the water absorbs quite a bit of light. It absorbs red more than it absorbs blue. As you can see in this wikipedia article on Electromagnetic Absorption by Water, there's about 100x more absorption of red/orange light (per metre of water) than blue/purple light. I'm not sure that simple white balance ...


5

In Camera RAW 7.0 you can just click on the little arrows on the top right or top left of the histogram display. The one on the left turns on/off the shadow indicator(blues), the one on the right turns on/off the highlight indicator(reds). Alternatively you can use the keyboard "O" to toggle the highlight warning, and "U" to toggle the shadow warning. ...


4

This is certainly something easily done in lightroom. If you import all 1200 photographs you can select all and then apply whatever development processes you want before exporting as jpg. My preferred route though would be to create a development preset and set that as the default before importing and then to create a filesystem publishing entry with ...


4

What you need to do when in Camera Raw, if you think you may want to make further ACR changes, is instead of clicking the Open button, first hold down Shift and the button will switch to "Open Object". Now click it and you will get a smart object layer. You can double click on that at any time and reopen ACR and make adjustments and keep anything you've ...


3

You would have to upgrade Lightroom or Elements, as only the latest versions support the 6D. The Canon 6D requires Camera Raw 7.3, which is compatible with Lightroom 4.3 Photoshop CS6 According to Adobe, Photoshop Elements 11 only supports ACR 7.0-7.2. However, it appears the 7.3 update may be applied to PS Elements 11.


3

It is now supported in the LR3.4/ACR6.4 update. Along with Canon EOS 600D (Rebel T3i / Kiss X5 Digital), Canon EOS 1100D (Rebel T3 / Kiss X50 Digital), Fuji FinePix S200 EXR, Fuji FinePix F550 EXR, Fuji FinePix HS20 EXR, Fuji FinePix X100, Hasselblad H4D-40, Kodak EasyShare Z990, Nikon D5100, Olympus E-PL1s, Olympus ...


3

When you are in Camera RAW, make whatever adjustments you like, then press the shift key. The open button changes to Open Object. This gives you a re-editable object -- i.e., you can dive back into Camera RAW if you like simply by double-clicking the smart object layer. All of that said, if you make any raster level adjustments in Photoshop -- say a ...


3

Any image that is not a native RAW format or DNG only provides the basic set of white balance options. This could be JPEG, as well as TIFF, PSD, or any other image format that Lightroom can load. The reason for this is that the full range of white balance and exposure adjustments are only really viable with RAW files to start with, and adjusting any one of ...


3

The support for the Canon 7D's RAW files was incorporated in Camera Raw 5.6 and the latest version of Camera Raw supported by Photoshop CS2 is 3.7 so there are no support for the .cr2 files created by the 7D in CS2. Unfortunately there is no way of opening these files in such an old version of Photoshop (unless there's a strange hack that I don't know of) ...


2

This happens when you try to open a JPG image with Adobe Camera Raw or Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. Here is an example of what I see when I open a JPG image:


2

Using the Monitor RGB profile to display an image on a monitor calibrated to use the same profile is equivalent to turning off calibration, are you sure this is what you want? You can turn off Proof Colors in the View menu while editing . It's not necessary to keep turned on unless you are proofing an image for a specific viewing environment/print setup, ...


2

Typically the only way to replicate the same RAW conversion as a manufacturer uses in camera is to use the software that they provide(typically with the camera). In this case I think you want to first try MyFinePix Studio. I don't have the software, and the website is pretty vague on if it includes RAW conversion or not, they make it sound like strictly a ...


2

I sucessfully used NEF-to-JPG. It is freeware, and can convert from NEF to JPG or TIFF formats


2

I don't know about NEF, but I know with CR2, I have the ability to adjust how the RAW file is imported, but after import, you are working with a standard raster graphic in Photoshop and a lot of information for use with color correction and exposure control is lost. This is also the reason why Adobe Lightroom exists as a product. In general, the best ...


2

The Canon Rebel T3i is supported in ACR version 6.4.1 which, unfortunately, means Photoshop CS5 or better for you: http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=5104 for some more detail. You may want to consider the upgrade to CS6 or, alternately, getting the latest Lightroom version which will allow you to export to Photoshop while handling the ...


2

You can convert your cr2 files to DNG files. DNG files are openable with anything. You can convert them using this tool http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/product.jsp?product=106&platform=Windows


2

You need a newer version of ACR, and for that a newer version of Photoshop. An alternative to buying a new edition of Photoshop could be to use raw therapee. If you edit your raw files with raw therapee, you can do further processing in photoshop cs4, if you like. Raw therapee: http://www.rawtherapee.com/


2

CR 8.2 is for Photoshop CC, and will not be usable by CS5 or CS6. Compatibility chart


2

There is this Adobe blog post with link for ACR for Photoshop CC or CS6: http://blogs.adobe.com/crawlspace/2011/03/keeping-photoshop-up-to-date.html#notconnected


1

The easiest way I found was with Adobe Camera Raw for Photoshop Elements. ACR 6.2 is the latest version for Photoshop Elements 8. This is what I use and it works fine with Nikon's NEF's, just open them and save as JPEG.


1

Image View plus more 2 can do this. In Preferences "p" you choose the raw processing parameters that fits best your images. Then you "save all to new folder" and choose bmp or jpeg. In case of jpeg , make sure the jpeg quality (p) is max. It is based on DCRAW. I have photoshop elements 9 and I liked the result from imgview better. If you want more dynamic ...


1

why not use the Adobe bridge which comes with photoshop?? try this source, First, Photoshop wants you to select the images to process. If you started in Bridge, it is already set to process the image files that you selected in the previous step. If you launched the image processor from inside Photoshop, you will have to browse for the images that you ...


1

If you are on Linux or Mac, you can try Darktable which supports 6d since version 1.1.2. Free as in free beer / free speech. (I'm not associated with them, I just happen to think it's very good piece of software).


1

Gday. I had to update my LR3 to LR4 since Adobe didn't make a newer ACR (adobe camera raw) that would support the 6d (ACR for LR4) LR4 is good for playing with colours and exposure. It's pretty useless for image masks and fancy photoshoppy stuff. So both programs are useful to have. DPP is also useful to have as its quick preview is super quick. If I ...



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