Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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11

Generally I'd say it's not worth trying to adapt an FD lens for the EF mount. The reason for this is that the EF mount has a larger registration distance, that is distance from the sensor the mount so that any simple FD to EF adaptor will act like an extension tube and you wont be able to focus beyond a few meters! Canon produced an adaptor with a glass ...


11

You may want a coupling ring ($7). This lets you mount one lens, in reverse, to another lens. This gives you insane macro capabilities, and very little depth of field. You will find that focusing takes an extremely long time, and you need to set your aperture on your reversed lens first, mounted normally, before flipping it. Not-too-good-example


11

The lens properties stay exactly the same. However, you might record the image differently. Sensor size is going to be the biggest factor, as you noticed, as it affects both field of view and depth of field. And since you're recording a smaller area in the center of the image circle, you're (probably — individual results may vary) getting the best part of ...


10

Don't even think about it, exchange it. Putting an FD lens on an EF body requires using either an adapter with an optical element (loss in image quality + focal length multiplier) or an adapter without an optical element (loss of infinity focus). Either way, if you want to use an old lens on your Canon, there is a huge selection of other cheap, decent glass ...


10

You will need a Reverse Mount Adapter, here's an example. You mount the adapter to the body, then mount the lens and finally you attach the second part of the adapter to the back of your lens.


10

Theoretically yes. It depends on the flange focal distance for this given bayonet mount. You can mount, say, Nikkor F lens to Canon body. Nikon F lens have longer flange focal distance and even mounted on top of a Canon mount (farther away from the film than the original canon lens) will still be close enough to the film (sensor) to focus to the infinity. ...


9

In short, because there is no room to do that, without prohibitive cost in additional optical elements. The lens and body are designed to provide the correct distance between the optical elements and the sensor. On a Nikon, that distance is on the order of 45mm (from memory, it can be looked up somewhere or measured on cameras with a reference mark on the ...


7

I use an older Pentax 50mm f/1.7 on my 60D and get spectacular results. I have the exact adapter shown in your post and it works great with barely any play between the lens and body. The only problem with old glass is that it typically has poor handling of flare so be mindful of light sources and use a hood.


7

Those lenses sound like auxiliary "converter" lenses, which are generally intended to thread onto the filter threads of another lens to convert that lens to a longer or wider focal length. They're more common for advanced point-and-shoot cameras than SLRs and won't do anything useful without a lens to mount them onto. In my experience, these converter ...


6

Short answer: yes, but you won't like the results. Longer answer: those old lenses sure are fun :) ... but you still won't like the results. Here are some details: There are adapters, and you can by cheap glassless ones (that won't allow infinity focus -- they basically act like extension tubes) or adapters with glass to allow infinity focus but that have ...


6

The question asks for photo examples, and having recently gone through this exercise first-hand, I'll share my results. I bought a Helios 44-2 58mm F/2.0 (M42 mount) on ebay for very cheap. To use the lens with my Nikon D7000 body, I bought a Fotodiox Lens Mount Adapter which includes a removable infinity focus correction lens. Shooting with the infinity ...


6

I don't think it exists as the shape of a lens hood is determined by the angle of view of the lens, you would need a different step-up hood combo for every different filter diameter and every different focal length. Also screwing on a filter inside the hood would be fiddly. What you want is a lens hood that attaches to a 77mm filter thread, but then I fear ...


6

EDIT: Regarding your edit. That is NOT HDMI output. What you are looking at is tethered shooting. It is available directly for Android here. For now on iOS, you need an intermediate computer to do the relay and this app. ORIGINAL ANSWER: If that DSLR is the Canon EOS 6D, you just need the Canon App (iOS and Android) and will be connected wirelessly. You ...


6

The Nikon TC-16A did just that. You could mount a fully manual lens, and it would basically convert it to AF, but as RBerteig says at a considerable cost and loss of a full stop. For that reason it was meant to work with f/2.8 or faster lenses. You would also lose some focus range. And being a teleconverter, you obviously have a 1.6x focal length ...


6

If the image in the viewfinder was dark, I would say you are probably not opening the aperture. However, as you mention it is cloudy grey, I think it is more likely that you are simply not getting close enough to your subject. You need to get within a couple of centimetres of your subject to form an image when using a reversed lens. As Unapiedra said in the ...


5

I found myself in the same boat about a year ago, and I considered picking up an SD-to-CF adapter to use SD cards in my camera. All the research I did, however, showed really spotty results for these adapters, so I bagged that idea and bought a couple CF cards and a USB card reader for the CF cards. The ultimate driver for me was reliability. At the end ...


5

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: But you probably don't want to. You can often make stuff like this work, but you almost always lose autofocus, aperture stop-down, and perhaps metering. If you're going to shoot a manual lens, you should buy one of the cheap classics for your system (of which Pentax has many - look into Super Takumar and SMC Takumar).


4

This site lists the flange distances for most lenses. Any lens system that has a flange distance greater than yours should be able to be adapted without extra glass. You can see that the Leica M mount is only 27.95mm and should be able to adapt almost any glass given the proper adapter. If that adapter exists, I can't say.


4

An adapter with a lens in it will degrade quality in some rather unfortunate ways. The reason a modern lens has so many elements in it is to combat the effects of things like chromatic aberration, to make sure the corners are sharp when the centre is, etc. You can't do that with a single lens, because different wavelengths of light bend at different rates, ...


4

If Canon was to release a mirrorless body and wished to support the EF/EF-S lenses on it, it would require an adapter because the registration distance will have changed. Basically, the gain with mirrorless is a thinner body, so the optical construction of current Canon lenses wouldn't work for it out of the box.


4

There are lots of adapters for Nikon lenses on Canon cameras. With all of them, you'll get infinity focus, due to the fact that Canon's lens registration is shorter than Nikon's. What you'll forgo is autofocus and auto-stopdown during exposure. You will have to meter by stopping down, setting the exposure, opening up to focus, and then stopping down just ...


4

The 30D remote shutter release is very simple - all you have to do to activate the shutter is short two pins - no arduino needed. All you need is to take a microswitch (I used the reset button from an old computer for my DIY shutter release) and connect it the old shutter release cable so that the old cable presses the microswitch (sounds like a job for ...


4

Metabones makes an EF-to-E adapter that brings all of the electronic features across except autofocus and some of the lens correction information. A full-featured adapter could happen, but you could lose out on an awful lot of shooting waiting for it. Selecting lenses with an eye toward the future is a good idea, but the adapter's US$400 price tag makes ...


3

You'll have to be within a foot or two. I used a glassless adapter with my 30D and an FD 135/2.8 and had to be within roughly 6 feet to focus on the subject. I have an FD 35-70, too; if you don't get an accurate answer by tonight I'll try to measure the exact distance for you with it at 50mm. I also have a cheap (I think it was $1 from KEH) off-brand ...


3

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Mount-Adapter-Infinity-Focus/dp/B001D8X72G says that it's product will "Focus to Infinity", so I think you'll be fine, if you buy the right product. Of course, the way that they manage to do this is with a slight optical distortion. Alternatively, you might just consider buying a 50mm 1.8, they aren't that expensive, and the ...


3

C mount is universal, CS is the same mecahnical thread but a shorter back focal distance. C mount CCTV lenses are normally very short focal lengths, they are made for wide angle with TV cameras that have very small imagers = very large crop factors. They are also generally poor optical quality - CCTV doesn't demand Ansel Adams levels of sharpness. So it's ...


3

While i haven't used such lens myself, any adapter with optical element is going to degrade quality somewhat, just because you are introducing another element to optical system. Also cheap adapter is unlikely to have high quality lens, compounding the problem. After reading various comments on Internet, main effect appears to be loss of sharpness. But i was ...


3

I'd recommend exchanging it. I had a Canon FD 135/2.8, and it was a great lens, very light and fun to use, but I had to stop it down to f/8 to get sharp, CA-free pictures through the FD-EOS (with glass, for infinity focusing) adapter. I got some good pictures out of it that way, but a 135/8 lens isn't all that interesting. I kept an FD 35-70 f/3.5-4.5 to ...


3

To get a smaller threaded lens to work with a 58mm adaptor just requires the appropriate stepping ring. You can get an entire set of these for not much money, or you can measure the lens to find out exactly which size you need (my money would be on the value stated on the lens itself to be the correct one): ...



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