Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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36

Since there are 3 important variables here: aperture, shutter speed and ISO, I would Google for Exposure Triangle Cheat Sheet for example. Here are a few: Manual Mode Cheat Sheet (Muddyboots Photography Blog) Exposure Chart Cheat Sheet (Flickr) My Exposure Triangle Cheat Sheet (glark.org) Aperture, ISO, and Shutter Speed Explained (not a sheet, but you can ...


19

There's really only one thing you need to memorize and it's easy: a list of standard f-stops in graduations of one f-stop (1, 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32, 45, 64, 90). Once you notice that every other one doubles (with some rounding starting at f/11), you only need to remember the first two, 1 and 1.4. (Usually you can see this sequence printed ...


18

Just cut a hole in a piece of paper, and tape it over a wide-aperture lens? See, for instance, this link and this link.


17

What are the basic calculations you're referring to? Other than doubling/having shutter speed or ISO when I open/close the aperture a stop I don't find myself doing any, I just fiddle with the settings 'till the image looks right on the LCD. After a while you get a feel for what settings work in what circumstances and the process becomes much quicker. ...


14

I have the Lumiquest Softbox III that's mentioned, and I find it useful as a super-portable softbox that's better than nothing. Given the option to have a huge softbox that would be my first choice, but the small softbox, placed very close to a subject, works really well and provides a much softer directional light than one would get with a bare flash or ...


11

I suggest you should observe how limitations of your existing gear keep you from getting photos that you want, and make your purchase decisions based on that. It's very personal, so there's no single roadmap that applies to everybody. But they key to avoid wasting money is: whenever you're going to purchase something, have at least couple of images in mind ...


10

It is possible to wash most of them in a washing machine -- just be careful not to use any fabric softener. If you're ultra-paranoid about your glass (like me), you may want to write off any dirty cloths for use as screen wipes, or pass to relatives for use as glasses wipes, and replace with a brand new cloth for your lenses.


10

You can check BlackRapid R-Strap. As @jrista mentioned in his comment, you can Do It Yourself if you want.


10

When it is dirty, no more or less often than that. If you can't see any obvious dirt or fingerprints then don't touch the lens surface at all with anything. Every time you touch a lens element it's an opportunity for damage so it's not really worth it unless the dirt is visible in your output.


9

I got a Frio as a freebie in a photography class grab bag. Its a nice option: it mounts directly to the tripod mount stud, and since its all plastic, it doesn't harm your flash contacts at all. It is about the size of a thumbdrive, so it fits in your pocket. Its overpriced as a piece of plastic, but quite affordable compared to other more complex options. ...


8

I don't have a personal tale of great gear disappointment, but I offer some general advice. Be clear what problem you are trying to solve Are you buying a new body in order to become a better photographer? That's probably not going to happen. On the other hand, buying a new body to get improved noise at high ISOs may well work out nicely for you. ...


8

Based on what you described, I would describe that upgrade path as "foolish." Certainly you are entitled to spend your money how you see fit, but it seems like buying a $1600 lens (can't imagine how much it costs in Brazil) is a piss-poor investment. Lenses certainly hold their value (until newer better models come along). But can you justify the nearly ...


8

You will probably replace the camera body you buy now long before any of the current camera manufacturers retire their systems (or go out of business or whatever). With the rate of improvement and innovation in camera electronics right now, one generally doesn't consider a camera body to be a long-term purchase. A bigger concern would be the accessories you ...


8

Some suggestions and comments, in no particular order of importance. Lenses For indoor shooting, a 55-300mm lens will do you close to no good, unless you have an amazingly large indoor area. You'll only be able to use the shortest focal length end (around 55mm), where the quality is most likely the worst. For most of my indoor shooting I use a 35mm prime ...


7

Alfred, I would recommend doing some homework on a case by case basis. For the 50mm f/1.2L, Alan is right, the 50mm f/1.4 is a great value for the money and will work really just fine. I have a full frame Canon 5D Mark II and this is one of the first lens I bought. I use it to shoot concerts, live performances, etc. I just shot 350 frames tonight in a very ...


7

I highly recommend Zeikos battery grips. I have the Zeikos grip for my 5D Mark II, and I could not be happier. It matches my 5D2 perfectly, with no flex. With two batteries, it gives it enough heft to match my bigger lenses. It has vertical shooting controls (which I never use), and sits firmly attached to my 5D2 body. I bought it from Amazon, paid $90.00, ...


7

I've used extension tubes in the past, with success, but what I did find was that you'll have to manual focus because the AF sensor gets really crazy with tubes. For most macro work you'll want to focus manually anyway, so use your camera's live view. I would stay away from close up filters. They're bulky and the quality is very poor. In general, if you ...


7

This can be accomplished pretty easily just using an Eye-Fi SD card (a standard SD card with a built in wi-fi transmitter) and the corresponding Eye-Fi app on your iPhone. The app connects to the card via an ad-hoc network allowing the photos to be transferred. Eye-Fi cards start around €20 and the app is free on the App Store. More information on the ...


7

You need something like this: http://www.amazon.com/DL-0418-Tripod-Female-Thread-Adapter/dp/B0049UPNV8 Or maybe this one, for a lot less money: http://www.amazon.com/Flash-Stand-Adapter-4-inch-Tripod/dp/B005HTZJBY/ref=pd_cp_p_2 There are lots of other models. Some, like the top one shown here, provide a hot shoe so that you can trigger the flash ...


6

For the exposure, you can try an analog light-meter, like the Gossen Lunasix. Yes, I know it sounds like I did not understand your question. But I did, please keep reading. This kind of light-meter is made of two parts: A proper light meter that displays the luminance of the scene with a thin needle on a logarithmic scale (the scale with a yellow ...


6

I've never used one, but as far as I can tell it's just a bubble level combined with a device to click through increments of 15 degrees or so. If my job was shooting panoramas all day long then it might make the process a little less laborious, but if you're taking time of the composition, lighting and camera settings for your panorama then lining the shots ...


6

The two lens you own might work, but be aware that their minimum focusing distance might not fit what you need. Macro lenses are special in that they have a much shorter MFD than regular lenses - this means that you can get closer to your subject and still focus, giving you a much larger subject for the same resolution. This is important when photographing ...


5

The only thing I can really suggest about a Canon upgrade path is avoid EF-S lenses. Most canon equipment is compatible with all of their bodies, except EF-S lenses. Those are designed specifically for APS-C sensors, which your 450D has. When it comes to the quality of the equipment you plan to buy, it kind of depends on what you do. If you are a serious ...


5

Let's put it this way: even a cheap softbox is better than nothing. That said, the larger the softbox, the better, although it will look a bit odd on your flash. (I have one that's like 8in. square.) And, in those situations where you don't have much else, it is better than nothing. Like @dpollitt says, I would first attempt to bounce the flash, but when it ...


5

Rebel X (EOS-500/Kiss XS without pop-up flash) is a fairly recent entry level body. It uses EF lens mount, so the lenses should work fine with current Canon DSLRs. The flash hot-shoe is also compatible with current models, although Rebel X did not support E-TTL. The flash will work on a Canon dSLR, but the features it will offer depend on the flash and ...


5

With a view to indoor photography I'd say the best accessories would be: hotshoe flash, could be a cheaper all manual model sync cables for triggering the flash off camera shoot through umbrella lightstand with umbrella holder fast 50mm lens Obviously there's a strong lean toward lighting here but I feel that's the best (and most fun) way of improving ...


5

I use Lineco Self Adhesive Mounting Strips. The advantage of these is that the photo is not mounted physically at all to the mat. This takes into account the different rates of expansion (due to humidity changes) that the photo and the mat have, the photo will never buckle since it floats on the back of the mat. Plus it is super easy and cheap also!


5

Clean your lens when it needs it. Not any more complicated than that. The goal is to eliminate the chance that something on the lens will impact your photo. Due to how close the dust is to the lens, and the fact that you are focusing far from the dust, you will be surprised at how much dust makes very little to no impact. If you are concerned about ...


5

It's not really a big deal for two reasons on both sides of the equation. On the one hand, dust on the lens is positioned at a place where it will have negligible impact on the final image. That's because they'll be completely out of focus, and are so tiny to begin with Generally, it's not worth worrying about. On the other hand, lens glass is very hard, ...


5

Yes, they should not come with a ballhead. That lets you choose the ideal one for your needs. You need to calculate the weight of your camera and lens and multiply by two for good measure. Then lookup one that supports at least that weight. You will usually have a choice of direct attachment or quick-release plates. Your camera is small, so I would go with ...



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