Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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4

You seem to be under the misapprehension that all lenses should cost what a 50mm f/1.8 costs. The 50mm lens is actually the outlier. The focal length lends itself to simpler designs. An 85mm lens, to achieve f/1.8 must have glass that covers an aperture opening of 85mm/1.8 => 47.2mm vs. a 50mm/1.8 => 27.8mm. So it requires bigger glass elements throughout, ...


0

The price difference is most likely based on the optical design. An 85/1.8 lens will most likely have more elements and larger diameter glass on the outer side. In general, if you are choosing between 50 and 85mm for portraits, make sure that the lens can focus close enough to do a headshot, that you will be able to properly fit your subjects in the frame ...


0

Another factor is the quantity manufactured. As a general rule, 50mm lenses are sold in larger volume than 85mm lenses. Initial cost is shared between more copies.


5

The 85mm requires bigger glass elements to be able to offer the same aperture f/1.8 as a lens with a shorter focal length. This alone makes it cost more. In addition, it becomes heavier so it also needs a more powerful focus motor.


0

The twin row of numbers is the Distance Scale. The Depth of Field scale is the unlabeled set of inscribed lines in the silver ring behind the distance scale to right & left of the black focus point indicator dot. These lines show the depth of field when the aperture is set at f/5.6, f/11 & f/16. In this image the lens is focused at just under 1.2m, ...


1

The extra scale is a depth of field scale. It's basically using slide ruler technology against the distance scale to let you set your DoF the way you want. The symmetrical numbers are for a given aperture setting. If you set the one number against one distance, them matching opposite number tells you the other end of the DoF, in distance. To set ...


1

How do these three lenses perform in producing sharp images when used wide open? It's often said in that the 50mm f/1.2 lens is Nikon's sharpest 50mm f/2 lens. At f/2, it's tack sharp, sharper at f/2 than either the 1.4 or 1.8. Here's the thing: almost no lens is at its sharpest wide open. Every lens is different, but usually it's at least a couple stops ...


1

These are completely different designs from decades apart. The F/1.8G and F/1.4G have a window to show the focus distance because the camera can control it via autofocus. When the camera drives a lens like that, the focus scale rotates within the window. The user can also turn the focus ring itself to change the focus distance. The F/1.2 has a direct focus ...


3

I think you forgot one really basic thing. Image quality. You may want a side-by-side comparison of the much older D design to the digital-era G design on a full-frame camera, such as this one on the-digital-picture.com, where the two lenses are tested on a D3x. In that comparison, mousing over the test chart crops will switch between the two test setups. ...


3

"...all Pro FX bodies have AF motor built inside the body. Hence, SWM in 'AF-S' lens is redundant." Not necessarily. The performance of camera based focus motors and lens based focus motors is far from identical. SWM lenses tend to focus faster and more quietly than their non-SWM counterparts. Add the mechanical interface between the body and lens and the ...



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