Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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21

You can use Photoshop's Vanishing Point filter for this. It's easiest to use a 3D-capable version of Photoshop,ยน which I presume you have, since you haven't mentioned any other 3D software. There is an alternate path for those using a version of Photoshop that lacks the 3D features, which I will cover inline below. This technique works best with a ...


14

That is definitely not chromatic aberration. It looks like an artistic effect inspired by Anaglyph images, which are those old style 3D images that used red and blue goggles. Edit: On further inspection it appears to actually be an anaglyph image, although it is of course possible that this was used as an artistic effect.


13

While technically this isn't a "3D" photo, it does simulate a three-dimensional look by exploiting parallax displacement. Cameras are what we call "monocular" devices, in that they have a single lens system and single sensing device. As such, they are not parallax devices, and cannot sense depth directly...only indirectly via other effects such as depth of ...


12

The easiest way is to buy yourself a 3D camera. This option has an excellent advantage: You can see the 3D effect while you compose and when reviewing your images which lets you know if the shot you take worked to give the 3D impression or not. Otherwise you have to take 2 nearly identical photos with slightly different viewpoints. There are three methods ...


11

You are really asking two completely different questions. Can we put 3D effect in an image? Can I watch a 3D image without using any coloured glasses? For #1, consider that 3D images are not a single image, the 3D effect is achieved by having two different images taken from a slightly different point of view. To see the 3D effect you have to feed these ...


9

You could probably in most cases reconstruct an image that looks convincing, but you can't recreate what's actually seen from a point between the viewpoints. Take for example an image that is taken right in front of a wooden fence, where the two viewpoints are each in the middle of a panel so that they both only see the panel. A viewpoint in between would ...


8

The easiest solution is always the simplest! Borrow or rent a good looking chair from one of yor friends. Put it in the house your friend is selling and take a picture... It would all be done in a couple of hours. Isn't this way simpler then spending the next couple of weeks learning 3DStudio Max? If you are going the 3DS Max route, just make sure it ...


7

This is not that hard to do by hand but it is labour intensive. The process is roughly as follows: Take the original still photograph and extract the subject (the model) to a new document Fill in gap in the where the model used to be, by hand or using content aware fill. Warp or texture map the now empty background image onto the inside of a cuboid Add ...


6

I've "done" one recently by accidentally shooting two photos of a bench from slightly different angles. Upon going back and forth between the two in Lightroom, it reminded me of these Animated GIFs you see online that simulate a stereo effect from such a pair. A cheap way to create a form of 3D, for sure. Here is the result below, not that great, maybe they ...


6

There is a distance limit. It depends on the baseline, the focal length and the pixel pitch. Disparity Maps The depth information is calculated by comparing two feature points in the two images. The difference in point position is called disparity. In rectified, parallel stereo cameras you end up with a disparity map. This contains all the information for ...


5

Stereoscopic photography is the art of taking two photos of the same thing from a vantage point approximately 9-10cm apart from each other so as to mimic the distance between the human eyes. They are then viewed in such a way as to combine the two images. Much more than I can write here can be gleaned from the wikipedia entry here though I'm not sure if ...


4

To add to jrista's excellent answer, this technique is commonly known as "Wiggle 3D" or "Wiggle Anaglyph", so google for that to come up with more information and examples. Adorama has a tutorial on how to make them. Also, there are several 3D camera apps for iOS and Android that make these.


4

In your other question you mention you have a 7D and 30D, I'd be worried about the results you'd get with two different cameras and two different lenses, especially if one of them is a zoom. The 7D viewfinder gives different coverage to the 30D so you can't match focal lengths by viewing through the viewfinder, you'd have to shoot several images and use a ...


4

Yes, holography would be one example. Here's on explanation of "How Holograms Work". Also, on a smartphone, it would be possible to use a combination of anamorphosis and the phone's gyroscopic sensors to achieve this effect.


4

Check out Piku Piku. As far as I can tell, they use something like optical flow to find matching pixels in the two images, then use the depth information to make an interpolated view, with a simple nearest-neighbor guess for the missing pixels. It works pretty well on stereoscopic images I've tried it with, and gives an improved effect over wiggle ...


4

It depends on the effect you want. If you want a natural view, the separation between the images should be about 6.5 cm/2.5 inches, equal to the distance between the average person's eyes. However, if you do this, the stereo effect is limited to relatively nearby objects (6.5 m/20 feet), and objects that are too close will give a "double vision" effect ...


3

The file is a 1.5 MB GIF file using LZW compression and contains 84 images. To say that it is made from a "single shot" is misleading at best. You can clearly see 3D relative motion of the model against the background. In a "single shot" all the information that is visible in only some of the images would not be available at all. So the creator has either ...


3

It's certainly possible; your camera has E-mount; you could use adapter for A-mount lenses together with a 3Dstereo lens. Perhaps slightly more known is Loreo 3D lens, that comes in Sony/Minolta A, Canon EF, Nikon F or Pentax K mount and could be used with adapter for that mount. Or, you could combine an adapter for four-thirds and Panasonic 3D lens. As for ...


3

Citing something as advantageous depends on what you consider as an advantage; that said, if your goal is to generate an image that gives the viewer a sense of "being there" instead of some of the other uses to which photography can be put, then yes, there are advantages. Right now, there are at least the following technologies regarding 3D: New 3D movie ...


3

If you are doing much of this sort of work I would seriously suggest investing the time to learn Blender 3D - it will not cost you more than time and the sweat on your brow as it is completely free, (both without cost and Open Source), to get and to use for any purpose. It is cross platform but obviously needs a reasonable amount of storage and processing ...


2

Along with your current theory I'd like to point out that flourescents often have a bluer wavelength than other lights. It could be that they simply don't put out enough red colors while the sun and incandescents put out a healthy range of light in general.


2

The idea behind stereoscopic 3D image is to present to each of your eyes a slightly different image. Your brain will (try to) interprete the two images as being two different viewpoints of the same object and deduce the third dimention (depth). First you need a way to let your eyes see 2 different images. The simplest is to use a device which allow you ...


2

If you want the scenes to look natural: the distance should be the same as between your eyes - about 8cm. This is independent of the subject distance. If you use a larger separation, you're effectively simulating the perspective of a giant; I remember seeing an early 3D IMAX movie where they shot a scene with a 2m distance between the cameras, overlooking a ...


1

You're spot-on with the need to shift some parts of the red/cyan layers either more or less in order to achieve the control of the separation that you're after. One way to do it, if we're assuming that you're starting from a single 2D image, is to isolate different elements of the image onto their own layers, such as the background on one and the lamp on ...


1

What are you photographing? if you're photographing something where you can use a flashgun, then try slower shutter speeds with the lights out and use a single flashgun. That way it doesn't matter if the camera shutters don't trigger exactly the same time, they will both only see anything when the one lightsource is lit


1

There are telescopes that can take stereoscopic pictures of celestial bodies several light years away, so there really isn't a distance limit :-). Granted, they do it from opposite ends of the earths orbit (as noted in the comments), so they are quite far apart. That being said, there is a practical limit, and it's is mostly based on the difference in ...


1

Is it an actual 3D model or a screenshot from a 3D model? If it's the former then you can rotate either the model or orbit the camera to straighten the image. If it's the latter then there's nothing straightforward you can do as the information you need isn't there. You might be able to get an artist to redraw the face as though it were full face. From my ...


1

1) No 2) Modelling from this refrence. If you can take more photos of this chair you can create 3d model from this photos with autodesk new product http://www.123dapp.com/catch.



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