Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


12

For digital cameras, it's purely due to historical reasons - 35mm was the dominant size for film cameras and cinematography. As for why film cameras ended up with 35mm, I'd suggest 35 mm film and 135 film on Wikipedia as a good place to start. It's also worth noting that "35mm" is not actually the size of the image, which is 36x24 mm, but the width of the ...


7

Because the standard size for film cameras for a long time was 135 film which measures 35mm in width including the perforations and leaves enough space for a 36x24mm negative size. Since the Field of View (FoV) for any particular focal length lens is determined by the size of the film or sensor onto which the image circle is being projected, over time ...


6

XP2 film is C41 processed. However, from what I remember from back when I worked in a D&P lab, it can be printed through either the colour or B&W printing processes. Only B&W will give a completely colourless finish - colour prints from it usually have a sepia tone to them.


6

Notice the different perspectives in the image above, for lenses of differing focal lengths, caused by the distance between the camera and subject having to be changed - to keep the ratio of subject size to image size similar in each example. Cropping a wide angle image to a longer equivalent will not remove this effect. Moving closer, with a wider ...


6

Here's the basic problem with expecting a sub $200 telephoto lens to be good enough to consider using on an FX body later on: it ain't gonna' happen. The lens may fit and allow you to take pictures with it, but the results are going to be determined by the marginal quality of the lens rather than by the exceptional quality of the body. There are FX ...


5

You should not be looking to buy an FX lens. If your budget is $200 you won't find any lens. Don't restrict yourself to FX. An FX camera costs at least $1500 (D600, price out of memory). If you cannot afford a lens for $500, how can you afford a FX camera? You can get the 70-300mm Nikkor lens (the one with built-in focus motor) for $550, or so. This works ...


5

Theoretically if you keep the size of the entrance pupil and field of view the same then you will capture the same total amount of light regardless of the format. If your medium format sensor in 1.6 times larger (which is the upper end available today, the Leica S2 you mention is only 1.25 times larger), then to match your 35mm DSLR and 85mm f/1.2 lens ...


4

Not sure of your location, so can't really offer any specific stores/services, but developing/printing a roll of film is typically around $10-15 USD at a typical (chain/non-specialist-photo-lab) in the US. I'll bet you could negotiate a cheaper price with the manager of a specific store for 100 rolls at once. Prices usually include developing, so it may be ...


4

It really depends on how you define image quality. Currently medium format digital cameras and backs off higher resolution (up to 80 megapixels) than 35mm cameras (up to 36 megapixels). In good light with equally "good" lenses more megapixels will result in a sharper picture. Additionally a larger format makes it easier to design sharper lenses (in terms ...


4

It depends on the type of film and on your post processing. For black and white films there is not deed to cool them at all. When they mature well beyond their expiration date, they might get a bit slower if at all. It is different for colour emulsions. The three or four colour "layers" may mature at different speed which may then result in unwanted ...


3

Yes, storing them in the fridge is a good idea. The cool temperature slows the degradation of the film. Additional benefit is gained from the stable temperature. To prevent condensation, being an issue, simply take the film out of the fridge the evening before you intend to use it. Leave it in the canister until it has had chance to warm up to room ...


3

Not going to happen, full frame lenses are much more expensive to make than APS-C. $500 will only get you a basic full frame lens (which will still be pretty decent but limited.) Most quality zoom lenses for full frame are in the $1000 and up range with the top end ones for telephoto being $2000 or more. You have the right idea with wanting to invest in ...


3

After some digging, I think the problem was caused by both adapters tripping a small switch inside the lens socket. Here (this is not EOS 1v body): I found this article describing the issue (it's quite long, search for "Camera locks up with the manual focus lens installed"). Basically, once the switch is engaged, the camera will expect an electronic lens. ...


2

Things you need to consider is the change in DOF and FOV, just like when you convert crop frames to full frames. Lenses are built for a certain image circle and the performance of the optics is stressed more by having to project the rays into a smaller size. Medium sensors are large and makes easier to capture small details, and they collect more photons, ...


2

Keep in mind that the sensor is much larger and thus much more light comes through for a given aperture due to the larger entrance pupil needed to produce an image circle that covers the sensor. All the low light advantages that a full frame sensor has over a crop sensor are much further compounded by the growth to a much larger sensor. Each pixel covers a ...


2

For depth of field, you can use (for most practical purposes) the ratio of sensor diagonals — the crop factor. See Can a smaller sensor's "crop factor" be used to calculate the exact increase in depth of field? Exposure per area is the same. Other factors may also depend on sensor or film size and not translate in this way, of course. A ...


2

Using a step down ring to put a 55mm filter on a 50mm lens with at 52mm thread is likely to cause a small amount of vignetting. Any step down ring is likely to cause at least some vignetting. A 50mm or normal lens isn't as susceptible to the issue as a wider angle lens but you still will find it if you are looking specifically for it. I've used step down ...


2

In the face of blowing sand, weather-sealing is the difference between life and depth of your gear. While a few drops of water and even a light sprinkling does not do much to a non-weather-sealed lens. The same is not true of sand. In the desert where there wind picks up blowing sand, it gets everywhere was you know. Unfortunately that gets into lenses and ...


2

Walgreens probably just ran your B+W film thru the only process they have, which is most likely C41, then printed the result on color paper. If you care about the subtle differences between film and digital, it makes no sense to then process the film with a inappropriate process. That can result in arbitrary colors shifts, as you see, and most likely ...


1

If you use a step-down adapter to put a 52mm filter on a lens with a 55mm filter thread, then you are very likely to get vignetting. You should rather use a step-up adapter to put a 55mm filter on the lens with the 52mm filter thread. There is still some risk for vignetting, as the adapter places the filter further from the lens, but it's less than when ...


1

If you have no-frost fridge then keep the film there, preferably at the bottom (where it's not so cold) - this way you should be safe from a frost (which is a true killer, condensation alone isn't as dangerous as frost is) Year isn't really that long, I kept film for a longer while without freezing and it was fine, but it's better to be safe than sorry.


1

Depth of Field (DoF) is always a function of at least these variables: Lens focal length. Aperture expressed as a ratio between the diameter of the entrance pupil (often referred to as the effective aperture) and the lens focal length. the distance from the image plane to the plane of focus. The size of the image plane, often referred to as the camera's ...


1

Depth of field is related to f-stop and focal length, not size of the sensor directly. It is only indirectly related to sensor size because you'd pick a longer lens to get the same scene with a larger sensor. But f/22 on a 300 mm lens will have the same depth of field whether that is used as a telephoto for a "35mm" sensor (actually 24x36 mm), or a mild ...


1

I would use a 50 on your crop sensor cameras, it will give you a good position and good range to get a variety of shots from different distances as the model walks. The 50mm will in fact be around 70mm on your camera. The 35mm has some level of distortion compared to the 50mm so if you are not prepared to adjust this afterwards somehow then a 50 would be ...


1

On a APS-C Camera (as your Nikons are) I would recommend you 35mm (KB 56mm) if you want to have a "normal" (like eyes see) looking image. With 50mm (KB mm) you will get a light tele-zoom effect. On full-frame camera take 50mm.


1

As I have been scanning negatives for a while recently, I can offer my own insight here. In many cases, the 135 and 110 format negatives I've been scanning to not have even tone across the entire surface of the frame. With the larger format, there is often a pronounced "vignette" at the edges. For both formats sometimes the film just doesn't lay flat, but in ...


1

If you consider buying a used camera, you could look for a Leica cl/Minolta cle. They have exchangeable lenses and are compatible to the rest of the Leica system (if you can afford the lenses).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible