Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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6

The longevity of developed photographic film is a variable. This depends on the quality of the processing. If the process is well done, the fixing step has gone to completion and there will be no unexposed, thus undeveloped silver salt crystals. If fixing is incomplete, these crystals will in time self-reduce and blacken. If present in quality, the ...


6

It appears you have an intermittent light leak that is reaching the film while it is wound tightly on a spool, possibly the take up spool inside the camera. The distance between the bands in your sample and the differences in intensity look like the same event caused all three at a time when the area with the darkest band was on top and the areas with the ...


5

Disclaimer: I can't answer for Nikon, or any system other than Canon. But I can attempt to answer some of your questions in general, as relates to Canon film cameras. This will also serve to answer the same question someone else may have, but from a Canon point of view. Canon hasn't released a new film SLR since the EOS 30V and EOS 300X in 2004. The ...


5

Nobody can make this decision for you. Because everybody's preferences as to what and how they shoot and therefore which equipment is going to work better for them is going to differ. Not to mention that budgets vary and what's "worth it" in dollar amounts is also going to vary person to person. You can peer at test charts. You can read reviews. You could ...


4

Fujifilm's recent cameras take their design cues from rangefinder cameras of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. At that time, a look similar to this was typical, just as DSLRs in the 2000s tended to be rounded blobs of black plastic or today's smartphones are mostly shiny black rectangles. Therefore, there are many candidates, but I think perhaps the closest is ...


4

Film often fogs for two reasons; age or uncontrolled light exposure. With age, the film exhibits similar characteristics as with the first image. The fogging effect is evenly distributed throughout the length of the film. With uncontrolled light exposure (a light leak) you'll get similar effect, albeit more blotchy and often only around the edges of the ...


4

If you exposed at 800, then you should develop at 800. Pushing film with special developing isn't free. It usually makes the grain worse and reduces contrast. You don't want to do it more than necessary. Developing to 1200 after exposing at 800 will give the the drawbacks of pushing the extra 0.6 f-stops without the benefits. In fact, if the pictures ...


4

Assuming you're not talking about the normal exposure interval delay in closing the shutter after opening it, you should never experience any noticable delay in opening the shutter after pressing the shutter button unless: Your batteries are low. The self timer is slightly engaged. There is an electrical fault in the metering system. The batteries ...


3

The Nikon FA manual is interesting reading... On Page 39 there is a description of the exposure metering system that I think explains the delay you're encountering. Basically, when using one of the automatic modes, the metering system reads the exposure data and compares that to the patterns (about 30,000) stored in memory in order to determine the correct ...


3

A sync cable is a sync cable. If your camera has a PC port that your cable fits and your flash has a PC port that your cable fits then the camera should be able to fire the flash. Of course you will need to control the flash power manually when using a PC connection. If the flash in question doesn't allow for that it probably doesn't have a generic PC port. ...


3

You said you own an 18-55mm zoom lens. You can just set that one to 35mm and 50mm (there is a scale on the barrel that tells you what focal length your current zoom position corresponds to). That way, you can see the field of view each focal length gives you for yourself. Even though the same focal length will give you a different field of view on ...


3

If you want to experiment with a film SLR, my suggestion would definitely be to buy a used body compatible with your current lenses. You do not need to buy a new body. If you have Nikon lenses, look for a Nikon body. I don't know the Nikon range in detail, but current lenses should work fine on 1990s/2000s-era Nikon autofocus SLRs. One caveat is that film ...


3

For me, time is more limited than money, so I've usually had the shop scan the film and skipped prints altogether. Film scanning ought to result better quality by skipping an intermediate transformation and by detecting and "removing" dust automatically (except with black-and-white film). You can save money by scanning from film yourself, especially if ...


2

To answer your question directly, there are 3 spots where you're spending money for 'using film' and luckily for you there are cheaper options on all 3 fronts: Film Cost $16 is way too much, even for the Pro stuff, you can get 36 exposure rolls of Fuji Pro from BHPhoto for $10.29 each. And sure, you could really cut costs by going to non-'Pro' film and get ...


2

Devil's advocate: shoot digital. The ever-rising costs of film and developing as well as the cost (in time and/or money) to scan and clean an image is significant and from a non-artistic and monetary point of view digital is the clear winner over a fairly short time period. That is, of course, over simplification -- but it bears looking at. When I used to ...


2

$14 a roll! My goodness that's a lot of money! $16 prints? Where are you going!? That's more than my local drug store as well as my local photography shop. It should be close to $12 for 24 prints. All that aside, you could self develop color (it really isn't that hard if you know how to take a hot bath!) and can get over 20 rolls for about a $100 set up ...


2

Do you shoot B&W or colour? If you shoot in black and white, have you considered developing the film yourself? Developing colour film is more tricky, but black and white film development is a relatively easy process. I realise my answer will be much less relevant if you're shooting in colour, but thought I'd put my suggestion in to help anyone else who ...


2

Fuji's X-series cameras always remind me of the Minolta HiMatic 7s. The reason there are so many examples of cameras that look like a Fuji X-camera is probably that everybody wanted their camera to look like a Leica. Here's a comparison of the iconic Leica M3 with the Fuji X-100 from Nokton on Flickr: I'm looking for a mechanical vintage camera As ...


2

First of all, the Yashica 35 series cameras are quite nice and I think it's worthwhile trying to get your camera working again. Regarding your specific question, you can find helpful advice regarding battery corrosion in this camera here, summary: Use cotton swaps lightly moistened with white vinegar and lots of patience to clean out the corrosion, some ...


2

Yes, you can re-wet the film. If you do, make sure it is submersed long enough to be fully wet. Then dry it just like you would freshly developed and rinsed film. That means dipping thru Photo Flu solution as the last step before hanging to dry. Of course the drying area needs to be as dust free as possible. Hang it somewhere air isn't blowing around, ...


2

How much do i have to step back in order to compose my picture? That depends on how close you were to the subject in the first place. Which lens is better and why? It's really not a matter of what's better. It's just what you want. So, yes, a 35mm lens on a camera with a 1.6x crop factor behaves about like a 50mm on a full frame camera, and 50mm ...


2

Seems like a faulty exposure counter is a common problem. I found a great post explaining how to fix it here: Diana+ 35mm Back - Exposure Counter Not Counting? Here's a Fix! In short, the mechanism uses two gears, which aren't always held tightly together enough to actually turn. The procedure involves taking apart the 35mm film back and adding a simple ...


1

Although I never personally needed to do this, I found pretty fast on the internet guides on how to do it How to scan film Kodak guide Video guide on Youtube Bottomline what those guides are saying is: first thing you want to try is a cloth (those special cloths used for photographic works) you HAVE to use gloves while handling the film. some guides ...


1

Perfectly subjective. the 35mm will give the field of view of a full frame 52.5mm lens (aprox 50), while the 50 will give the field of view of a full frame 75mm lens. One thing to consider is how you are using each lens. the 35mm will make distant objects seem smaller, but you will get more of them. The 50mm will bring distant objects in closer. The ...


1

The D5200 has a crop factor of 1.5, so as you wrote, the 50mm will become 75mm and the 35mm a little over 52mm. Most photographers consider that portraits are best taken with a equivalent focal length of 70mm or greater (See Nikkor f/1.8G 35mm or 50mm? and 50mm vs 85mm for portraits on a crop sensor?). You can make also some statistics on the portraits you ...


1

You should research/test for your film stock. Note that TriX is about the most versatile film ever. I've pushed it to 1600 successfully, and the net has plenty of examples of it pushed to 3200. Look/ask around for what that will do to the contrast and resolution. Pushing TriX a stop will arguably have little effect if processed right. More importantly ...


1

There's technical information here about the various substitutes available that give you more options. The page lists several substitutes with information about availability as well as technical information regarding voltage stability.


1

The EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS is a very good constant aperture zoom that is optimized for the APS-C sized sensor of your 70D. In terms of field of view, it shoots much like a 28-90mm zoom would on a full frame camera.This gives you a wide range of focal lengths from just at the edge of wide angle to just into the edge of telephoto. In terms of cost it is more ...


1

I do not own either of the two lenses. From experience, I'd say the zoom is the better choice for traveling. The versatility of a single lens providing multiple focal lengths is a key advantage. I'd get a dedicated macro lens for the macro work. Here's a comparison of both ...


1

Cross processing (running an E6 film in C41 chemistry) results in different colors based on both the film and the chemistry used to process it. Films are generally known to more-often-than-not shift to one color. Velvia shifts red, Elite Chrome shifts green, etc. But, the intensity of those shifts often depends on the chemistry. The camera has very little to ...



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