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by garik

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21

I think you are putting too much emphasis on the "digital" part of the lens' DG designation. It seems to be more to differentiate them from "digital" lenses that are APS-C only. Sigma calls their current APS-C only lenses "DC". When digital SLRs first began to gain a foothold in the market, they almost all had sensors that were APS-C or similar sized. So new ...


16

Yes, lenses designed for digital sensors have several differences from their older film based camera lens counterparts. One of the primary differences is that digital sensors are more reflective than film, so anti-reflective coatings are applied to the rear element of a digital lens. This helps prevent reflections off the sensor that could result in image ...


15

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


6

There is one significant difference between film and digital sensor for lens optics - digital sensors have a bit of glass and some filters in front of them. The lensrental.com blog has a pretty extensive series of posts on the effect of the sensor stack (short version, there is a very real effect for large aperture lenses) - so it is quite possible that the ...


6

XP2 film is C41 processed. However, from what I remember from back when I worked in a D&P lab, it can be printed through either the colour or B&W printing processes. Only B&W will give a completely colourless finish - colour prints from it usually have a sepia tone to them.


6

Notice the different perspectives in the image above, for lenses of differing focal lengths, caused by the distance between the camera and subject having to be changed - to keep the ratio of subject size to image size similar in each example. Cropping a wide angle image to a longer equivalent will not remove this effect. Moving closer, with a wider ...


6

Some 'film' lenses designed for 35mm rangefinder cameras have a rear element which lies quite close to the plane of the film or sensor (mostly wide-angle lenses). These work fine for film, but when used on a digital camera cause quite noticeable colour shifts to the left and right of the frame. This is due to the extreme angle of the light from the rear ...


5

Theoretically if you keep the size of the entrance pupil and field of view the same then you will capture the same total amount of light regardless of the format. If your medium format sensor in 1.6 times larger (which is the upper end available today, the Leica S2 you mention is only 1.25 times larger), then to match your 35mm DSLR and 85mm f/1.2 lens ...


5

If you are sure you took 10 photos in the middle of the roll and they don't appear, it sounds like there is a mechanical problem that prevented the film advancing and prevented the shutter opening for 10 exposures, which somehow then righted itself after those exposures. There is a slight chance it could be due to not fully winding the film on during that ...


4

Not sure of your location, so can't really offer any specific stores/services, but developing/printing a roll of film is typically around $10-15 USD at a typical (chain/non-specialist-photo-lab) in the US. I'll bet you could negotiate a cheaper price with the manager of a specific store for 100 rolls at once. Prices usually include developing, so it may be ...


4

It really depends on how you define image quality. Currently medium format digital cameras and backs off higher resolution (up to 80 megapixels) than 35mm cameras (up to 36 megapixels). In good light with equally "good" lenses more megapixels will result in a sharper picture. Additionally a larger format makes it easier to design sharper lenses (in terms ...


4

It depends on the type of film and on your post processing. For black and white films there is not deed to cool them at all. When they mature well beyond their expiration date, they might get a bit slower if at all. It is different for colour emulsions. The three or four colour "layers" may mature at different speed which may then result in unwanted ...


4

After some digging, I think the problem was caused by both adapters tripping a small switch inside the lens socket. Here (this is not EOS 1v body): I found this article describing the issue (it's quite long, search for "Camera locks up with the manual focus lens installed"). Basically, once the switch is engaged, the camera will expect an electronic lens. ...


4

Unfortunately this is an opinion and even then only an estimate can be made because only you know how much force was exerted on the film. It is always worth it to me to try and develop a roll of film that could potentially come out poorly. If I find a roll in a vintage camera, to me the small cost of development greatly exceeds the potential benefits. ...


4

The OP commented elsewhere "I've seen people say it's actually ISO 800 Film intended to be pushed, and their data sheet says something about it being rated ISO 1000" and the data sheet is by far your best source of information. DELTA 3200 Professional has an ISO speed rating of ISO 1000/31º (1000ASA, 31DIN) to daylight. So yes, it is a fast film ...


3

Shorter version: Expose it as 3200 and shoot normally. Develop according to the instructions and make sure you use the correct development time for 3200. Longer version: Delta 3200 is not an ISO 3200 film, it is more like ISO 1000-1200. If you expose it as 3200 and develop according to the instructions, you are actually push developing it. The film ...


3

Yes, storing them in the fridge is a good idea. The cool temperature slows the degradation of the film. Additional benefit is gained from the stable temperature. To prevent condensation, being an issue, simply take the film out of the fridge the evening before you intend to use it. Leave it in the canister until it has had chance to warm up to room ...


2

For depth of field, you can use (for most practical purposes) the ratio of sensor diagonals — the crop factor. See Can a smaller sensor's "crop factor" be used to calculate the exact increase in depth of field? Exposure per area is the same. Other factors may also depend on sensor or film size and not translate in this way, of course. A ...


2

Things you need to consider is the change in DOF and FOV, just like when you convert crop frames to full frames. Lenses are built for a certain image circle and the performance of the optics is stressed more by having to project the rays into a smaller size. Medium sensors are large and makes easier to capture small details, and they collect more photons, ...


2

Keep in mind that the sensor is much larger and thus much more light comes through for a given aperture due to the larger entrance pupil needed to produce an image circle that covers the sensor. All the low light advantages that a full frame sensor has over a crop sensor are much further compounded by the growth to a much larger sensor. Each pixel covers a ...


2

If you use a step-down adapter to put a 52mm filter on a lens with a 55mm filter thread, then you are very likely to get vignetting. You should rather use a step-up adapter to put a 55mm filter on the lens with the 52mm filter thread. There is still some risk for vignetting, as the adapter places the filter further from the lens, but it's less than when ...


2

Using a step down ring to put a 55mm filter on a 50mm lens with at 52mm thread is likely to cause a small amount of vignetting. Any step down ring is likely to cause at least some vignetting. A 50mm or normal lens isn't as susceptible to the issue as a wider angle lens but you still will find it if you are looking specifically for it. I've used step down ...


2

In the face of blowing sand, weather-sealing is the difference between life and depth of your gear. While a few drops of water and even a light sprinkling does not do much to a non-weather-sealed lens. The same is not true of sand. In the desert where there wind picks up blowing sand, it gets everywhere was you know. Unfortunately that gets into lenses and ...


2

Walgreens probably just ran your B+W film thru the only process they have, which is most likely C41, then printed the result on color paper. If you care about the subtle differences between film and digital, it makes no sense to then process the film with a inappropriate process. That can result in arbitrary colors shifts, as you see, and most likely ...


2

why not simply set it to 3200 and run with it? That's what it's rated at... That said, it's a somewhat flexible film and you may get good results at 1600 as well. There's nothing wrong with doing what the package says you should do. Nor is there anything wrong with experimenting.


1

I've had a waist level viewfinder attachment for a Nikon, and I've also used medium format gear (like the Yashica) that used them, and I found that I didn't like them on 35mm that much. The 35mm viewing screen feels much smaller than square medium format, making it difficult to use without flipping up the magnifier and holding it up to your eye (which ...


1

@MirekE has some great advice. I would also add that you can play around with over and under developing easily with your 35mm. Find a scene that shows a wide range of values, ideally a scene where you can set the lens to infinity. The sun should be behind you and over your right or left shoulder. No clouds if possible so the lighting doesn't change suddenly. ...


1

You will generally find that a given lens manufacture sticks to a few filter sizes... or tries to. For Nikon, you'll find quite a few 52mm threads, then it jumps up to 62mm threads and then to 77mm threads. Sigma is a bit more over the place though has a number of 58mm threads and 72mm threads. And Tamron is mostly 62mm and 72mm threads. (I've only ...


1

If you have no-frost fridge then keep the film there, preferably at the bottom (where it's not so cold) - this way you should be safe from a frost (which is a true killer, condensation alone isn't as dangerous as frost is) Year isn't really that long, I kept film for a longer while without freezing and it was fine, but it's better to be safe than sorry.


1

Depth of Field (DoF) is always a function of at least these variables: Lens focal length. Aperture expressed as a ratio between the diameter of the entrance pupil (often referred to as the effective aperture) and the lens focal length. the distance from the image plane to the plane of focus. The size of the image plane, often referred to as the camera's ...



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