Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

9

The longevity of developed photographic film is a variable. This depends on the quality of the processing. If the process is well done, the fixing step has gone to completion and there will be no unexposed, thus undeveloped silver salt crystals. If fixing is incomplete, these crystals will in time self-reduce and blacken. If present in quality, the ...


6

It appears you have an intermittent light leak that is reaching the film while it is wound tightly on a spool, possibly the take up spool inside the camera. The distance between the bands in your sample and the differences in intensity look like the same event caused all three at a time when the area with the darkest band was on top and the areas with the ...


4

Film often fogs for two reasons; age or uncontrolled light exposure. With age, the film exhibits similar characteristics as with the first image. The fogging effect is evenly distributed throughout the length of the film. With uncontrolled light exposure (a light leak) you'll get similar effect, albeit more blotchy and often only around the edges of the ...


4

Assuming you're not talking about the normal exposure interval delay in closing the shutter after opening it, you should never experience any noticable delay in opening the shutter after pressing the shutter button unless: Your batteries are low. The self timer is slightly engaged. There is an electrical fault in the metering system. The batteries ...


4

You said you own an 18-55mm zoom lens. You can just set that one to 35mm and 50mm (there is a scale on the barrel that tells you what focal length your current zoom position corresponds to). That way, you can see the field of view each focal length gives you for yourself. Even though the same focal length will give you a different field of view on ...


3

Put a gel filter over your flash. Golden or orange (especially the CTO) will be best. These filters are available from various manufacturers and holders are also available,if you desire one. There is a product from Rosco that includes variety of pre-cut filters for this purpose that includes various effect colors, but also balancing ones. It is called The ...


3

The difference between 21mm and 28mm doesn't sound like all that much. But as focal lengths get shorter the difference per millimeter in focal length gets larger. In theory a 21mm lens should yield about a one third wider field of view than a 28mm lens. For a 35mm film camera that would be the difference between a 75º diagonal FoV for the 28mm lens and a ...


3

It really is a personal decision. Myself, I would bring the 28mm only and stitch together multiple images to get a wider shot if necessary. While backpacking I'm much more concerned with weight than the few extra minutes a stitch will take to capture and create later in post.


3

Googling around, it looks like you might be thinking of a Sawyer Bi-Lens 35mm slide viewer. Some were stereoscopes, some weren't, and apparently, some came with a built-in light and some didn't. It looks like there are a number for sale on eBay and the like (mostly with the built-in light and not the diffusion panel on the back), but as these are '50s / '...


3

Aperture has an obvious effect on two things: depth of field and exposure level. That means that the answer comes in two parts. First, exposure. Here, the important thing is the amount of light hitting any given point on the sensor, not total area. See more at Do the same camera settings lead to the same exposure across different sensor sizes?, but the ...


3

If a negative is pale and hard to see, then it means that not enough light reached the film. Basically, the pictures were grossly underexposed. Unfortunately, with film you don't get any feedback until the whole roll is developed. There may possibly be something mechanically wrong with the camera, the auto-exposure system of your camera, or most likely, ...


3

If a negative is pale and hard to see, then it means that not enough light reached the film. There could be a number of reasons for this. For one reason or another, the image is underexposed. When you get the CD with the photos, I would imagine that the images will be very very dark. The actual exposure time was too fast or the aperture was too small. Did ...


3

The Nikon FA manual is interesting reading... On Page 39 there is a description of the exposure metering system that I think explains the delay you're encountering. Basically, when using one of the automatic modes, the metering system reads the exposure data and compares that to the patterns (about 30,000) stored in memory in order to determine the correct ...


3

A sync cable is a sync cable. If your camera has a PC port that your cable fits and your flash has a PC port that your cable fits then the camera should be able to fire the flash. Of course you will need to control the flash power manually when using a PC connection. If the flash in question doesn't allow for that it probably doesn't have a generic PC port. ...


2

Seems like a faulty exposure counter is a common problem. I found a great post explaining how to fix it here: Diana+ 35mm Back - Exposure Counter Not Counting? Here's a Fix! In short, the mechanism uses two gears, which aren't always held tightly together enough to actually turn. The procedure involves taking apart the 35mm film back and adding a simple ...


2

If you want long archivability characteristics then you should stick to regular B&W film. XP2 is chromogenic film which uses dyes during development to produce the image. These dyes do fade out with time. There was a research that I read once about color negative films life and I believe (not sure though) it was red dye who start fading first, I can't ...


2

How much do i have to step back in order to compose my picture? That depends on how close you were to the subject in the first place. Which lens is better and why? It's really not a matter of what's better. It's just what you want. So, yes, a 35mm lens on a camera with a 1.6x crop factor behaves about like a 50mm on a full frame camera, and 50mm is ...


2

I have an AE1, On the AE1 the film counter will continue to progress ( the numbers will keep advancing) from 1 to 38 regardless of whether or not there is film in the camera, if there is no film in the camera you can keep actuating the shutter (after 38 is visible )and using the film advance lever forever. If you had loaded your film properly (the ...


1

You did not feel any tension during rewinding in camera and the film did not move when you tried rotating the center by hand. That suggests that the film separated from the center spool. The film is actually mostly in the cassette, but if it separated from the spool, it couldn't be rewound, which suggests that it was never unwound and exposed. There is the ...


1

Green tint is from poor scan job but the fog is because negatives were underexposed. The picture of the film on the light table does not look underexposed. Except perhaps one frame. Green fog comes from light leaks in the camera. All my other films done with the same camera don't have this problem. Light leaks usually aren't uniform across the ...


1

Some things to try to troubleshoot the problem… The colour of the film base, if not corrected accurately, could shift the colour of the scans in a consistent way toward green for all the shots on the roll regardless of the density of individual images. The exposure looks useable to me. Look closely at the edge numbering of the film. The exposure of that ...


1

Leaving the 28mm behind seems more useful than leaving the 21mm. If you're hand printing you can crop much more easily than stitching (I could crop in printing when I did my own years ago). While you do magnify the film grain this way, that's only an issue if you were printing almost as big as possible anyway. The down side of this approach is that your ...


1

To compare DOF you need two things: FoV (field of view) entrant pupil (the physical place from camera gathers the light) Given this two measurements you may confidently say which camera from two with same FoV will give smaler DoF (the one with bigger entrant pupil). You might also want to note that 645Z is only medium format slightly larger than 35mm ...


1

Another possibility, but unlikely, is that the lab did not develop sufficiently. The way to determine that is to look to the sides of the film. There should be fully developed lettering or numbering. If that is missing, the lab made an error. If the lettering is readable and dark, the labwork was ok and your exposure was off. From your description, off ...


1

Although I never personally needed to do this, I found pretty fast on the internet guides on how to do it How to scan film Kodak guide Video guide on Youtube Bottomline what those guides are saying is: first thing you want to try is a cloth (those special cloths used for photographic works) you HAVE to use gloves while handling the film. some guides ...


1

Perfectly subjective. the 35mm will give the field of view of a full frame 52.5mm lens (aprox 50), while the 50 will give the field of view of a full frame 75mm lens. One thing to consider is how you are using each lens. the 35mm will make distant objects seem smaller, but you will get more of them. The 50mm will bring distant objects in closer. The ...


1

The D5200 has a crop factor of 1.5, so as you wrote, the 50mm will become 75mm and the 35mm a little over 52mm. Most photographers consider that portraits are best taken with a equivalent focal length of 70mm or greater (See Nikkor f/1.8G 35mm or 50mm? and 50mm vs 85mm for portraits on a crop sensor?). You can make also some statistics on the portraits you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible