Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


12

For digital cameras, it's purely due to historical reasons - 35mm was the dominant size for film cameras and cinematography. As for why film cameras ended up with 35mm, I'd suggest 35 mm film and 135 film on Wikipedia as a good place to start. It's also worth noting that "35mm" is not actually the size of the image, which is 36x24 mm, but the width of the ...


11

Indeed, some cameras do need the leader. Usually they are manually loaded and winded - they use take-up spools with a slot for the leader. Advancing the film is performed by turning the take-up spool, and sprockets alone would not provide grip secure enough. For example, Bronica 135N/135W, Nikkormat EL-W. When the film has been fully rewound into cassette, ...


10

I have been using various Kodak E100 series slide films (100 ISO) in a Leica, with good optics, and the detailing that my Nikon Coolscan V gets out of these is absolutely absurd. I'd say about 20 megapixels' worth of detail, give or take - easily as good as my 16.7 mp 1Ds II anyway. Given a good exposure and focusing in the first place, of course. How this ...


9

Yes, if the room is truly dark and you work quickly, you'll be fine. But the room has to be totally dark. If you have a bathroom or walk-in closet with no windows, and you make sure no light is coming in through under the door, you shoudl be fine. Wait a few minutes in the dark for your eyes to adjust, to make sure you can't see any light around the ...


8

Let's tackle your questions separately: Film Camera The short answer is 'no.' There is no marketed utility that I'm aware of which would give you complete control over a film camera (even a relatively modern one). Now I can imagine a it would be possible (and even potentially relatively easy) to put together a DIY solution as long as the camera is recent ...


7

In short, yes, it is actually different, but only because the angle of view is by definition measured to the edge of your view — which is the edge of the sensor, which is (again by definition) different on APS-C. Your statement I think that the angle of view, depth of field, and compression are the same as on an FX/Full frame but we are seeing only ...


7

Because the standard size for film cameras for a long time was 135 film which measures 35mm in width including the perforations and leaves enough space for a 36x24mm negative size. Since the Field of View (FoV) for any particular focal length lens is determined by the size of the film or sensor onto which the image circle is being projected, over time ...


6

Unfortunately 126 film is no longer made, and even the stocks that were held on to after production ended have for the most part dried up. The good news is that you have another option, and that is to reload the 126 film cartridges with 35mm film. The 126 film was after all, just 35mm film in a more convenient roll that didn't require film leaders or ...


6

Any decent camera with some degree of macro capabilities will be a feasible slide/negative scanner, but, tthere are some other factors that incide a lot in the results. The first is an adequate backlighting device. Can be as complicated or as simple as you wish, as long as it allows you to get good exposure. I have tried different combinations of flash and ...


6

Here's the basic problem with expecting a sub $200 telephoto lens to be good enough to consider using on an FX body later on: it ain't gonna' happen. The lens may fit and allow you to take pictures with it, but the results are going to be determined by the marginal quality of the lens rather than by the exceptional quality of the body. There are FX ...


5

On a cropped sensor camera like the D90, I personally find a 35mm focal length more useful, and if I were buying I would go for the 35mm f/1.8 at half the price. Optically, my friends who have the 50mm f/1.4 say it's a bit soft wide open, but has nice bokeh. According to this review it is quite soft wide open, and sharpest at f/5.6. On the other hand, the ...


5

Conventional wisdom says about 6 MP at around IS0 200 when looking at overall image quality. Although film works very differently then digital images, so some people point out that the finest film grain is much smaller than a pixel on a 6 megapixels DSLR. I suspect this is why someone told you 24. While it is can be true, one pixel captures way more ...


5

The first hit I get on google for Tri-X 400 Pan tells me: KODAK TRI-X Pan Film has been replaced by KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X 400 Film / 400TX. The second hit is about Pro Tri-X 400, and that says: Compared to KODAK TRI-X Pan and KODAK TRI-X Pan Professional Film, the newer TRI-X 400 and 320 Films may have a slightly different retouching ...


5

There's an interesting and thorough paper explaining film resolution, granularity and print grain: http://cool.conservation-us.org/coolaic/sg/emg/library/pdf/vitale/2007-04-vitale-filmgrain_resolution.pdf There is no clear answer to your question as it depends on multiple factors, namely: Film's ability to record fine detail or resolution, which in turn ...


5

That all depends on the viewing distance, and, to a lesser degree the brand, age and speed of the film. As an example, ISO1600 B&W film will exhibit more grain than that from say, ISO 50 Velvia. If you were shooting a large wall hanging to go in a restaurant or café, then you can get away with much larger enlargements than if you were wanting to hang ...


5

Currently (July 2010) in the UK: photo express develop & scan 35mm or APS to 2048 x 3072 on CD for £4.50 Metro Colour Lab develop & scan 35mm to 4MB on CD for £6.50 or £7 for 18MB peak imaging develop & scan 35mm to 1800 x 1200 on CD for £6.96 (or more for higher resolution)


5

I worked in a professional photo lab for a number of years. Cross Processing was something that guys like Scott Clum and Trevor Graves were using for their photography back in the pioneering days of snowboarding. The effect produced is very striking. The most common characteristics of cross processing is contrast and extreme color crossovers. Crossovers ...


5

From memory, the takeup spool in my Nikon FM had a notch that didn't go the width of the film, so yes you had to have the leader cut to be able to insert it. As long as you have the film lined up properly, it would seem easier to insert a smaller width of leader into a spool than get the whole width in anyway. The reverse is true when developing. I always ...


5

I think the trick is less wasted film. If you think about the design of most leaders, the leader from one cut of film is also the leader for the next. Since in many (most?) cases, the leader is going to be exposed to light, it is going to be wasted film anyway. By reducing the amount of waste, costs of making the same number of useable frames is reduced.


5

You should not be looking to buy an FX lens. If your budget is $200 you won't find any lens. Don't restrict yourself to FX. An FX camera costs at least $1500 (D600, price out of memory). If you cannot afford a lens for $500, how can you afford a FX camera? You can get the 70-300mm Nikkor lens (the one with built-in focus motor) for $550, or so. This works ...


5

Theoretically if you keep the size of the entrance pupil and field of view the same then you will capture the same total amount of light regardless of the format. If your medium format sensor in 1.6 times larger (which is the upper end available today, the Leica S2 you mention is only 1.25 times larger), then to match your 35mm DSLR and 85mm f/1.2 lens ...


4

Yes it is possible, and this is referred to as "Cross Processing" Regarding the expected results, there is a good quote from wikipedia. Cross processing It is also possible to cross-process slide film for the E-6 process in C-41 , which yields negatives with a color shift and stronger saturation. (C-41 also may be processed in E-6 yielding ...


4

In short: you can enlarge it as much as you like. There is no technical barrier which will stop enlarging at any size, no matter how low your original resolution is. Of course the larger you print, the more you'll see grain/noise, the more you'll notice the fine details of the picture are missing. But the barrier for size is a purely aesthetical one, not a ...


4

I also had this issue and this is what I did. Take your desired exposure on your subject. Lets say you need a shutter speed of 1/50. Then, move you camera to where you want to place the shot, and adjust the ISO dial. So, if you want you shutter slower, take your ISO down, else take it up. This works perfectly for me, not the quickest, but then again, this ...


4

Sorry, but no -- a Konica FS-1 uses a different mount than either the Minolta MC/MD or the A mount. Konica did buy out Minolta, but this was quite a while after the FS-1, FT-1, etc., had been discontinued. They also sold the Minolta camera division off to Sony quite soon after acquiring Minolta. As far as I know, there was never any work done on creating ...


4

The "getting ripped off" part is over now, the money you overpaid is gone anyway. If you keep a lens you don't actually need, you've lost all the money you paid for it. You don't seem to be giving any other arguments for keeping the lens. I think the reasonable steps would be to try contacting the seller to exchange the lens for the one you were actually ...


4

It really depends on how you define image quality. Currently medium format digital cameras and backs off higher resolution (up to 80 megapixels) than 35mm cameras (up to 36 megapixels). In good light with equally "good" lenses more megapixels will result in a sharper picture. Additionally a larger format makes it easier to design sharper lenses (in terms ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible