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I keep reading articles about CCD vs CMOS image sensors. What is the difference between these two types? What exactly do these sensors do in terms of photography?

Is a CCD-based camera going to be able to compete in the future? If I buy one, can I count on using it for some years or would it be better to upgrade to a camera with a CMOS based sensor?

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4 Answers

Both have strengths and weaknesses - some of the top ones involve video mode (or live view mode).

  • Vertical streaking

    In live view or video mode, CCD sensors exhibit vertical streaking, where bright points of light in the frame, even at the edge, can create a vertical bright line from the top to the bottom of the frame. This is caused by current from a single pixel "overflowing" and leaking throughout the whole row. Note that professional video cameras which use CCD sensors (and cost thousands of dollars) have circuitry to minimise this. Also, when used for stills ie not in live view/video mode, CCDs operate in a different mode which isn't susceptible to vertical streaking.

    CMOS sensors don't exhibit streaking at all, as each pixel has its own circuitry isolated from other pixels.

  • Rolling shutter

    CMOS sensors exhibit a rolling shutter effect in live view or video mode. Instead of capturing the entire frame at once, information is read from each row of the frame one after the other, top to bottom. The whole process takes up to 1/30 of a second on most cameras. This creates a jelly-like wobbling effect in recorded video when the camera is handheld or moves a lot.

    In a given sensor, this rolling shutter happens equally regardless of the shutter speed, though with slower shutter speeds it may be less noticeable in subject movement due to the extra motion blur.

    CMOS sensors capable of higher video frame rates than 30 frames per second (and not just through repeating frames) will exhibit less streaking. Hypothetically, if you had a CMOS sensor capable of 48 frames per second (and not just through repeating frames) this would have about the same amount of rolling shutter effect as a 24fps film camera, which has an actual rolling shutter.

    CCD does not suffer from the rolling shutter effect.

  • Noise / quality in general

    They'll both perform similarly. Certainly for large sensors (DX, 4/3, FF) there is no practical difference apart from just individual differences due to the design of the sensor. CMOS technology is moving quickly and while it was once inferior, it seems all the best sensors (for still cameras) in the last year or so tend to be CMOS ones.

    For very small sensors such as in compact cameras and cellphones, CMOS sensors traditionally have poorer sensitivity, a result of making the pixels so small relative to the size of the circuitry on them. However, most new tiny CMOS sensors employ microlenses, and in the future will employ back illumination, which makes up for the sensitivity. Note September 2013 - back illumination is now commonplace in small sensors like cellphone cameras and CMOS sensitivity has increased incrementally. Unfortunately we are still in the grips of the megapixel war which counters that sensitivity gain to some extent.

Professional still cameras are increasingly using CMOS sensors these days, and the CMOS sensors you'll find in them are at least equal in performance to their CCD cousins. It so happens that CMOS technology is moving quickly at the moment and many of the best sensors these days are CMOS. Unless shooting video, there's no reason to pick a camera based on whether it has a CCD or CMOS sensor.

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thanks @thomasrutter. i am thrilled to read your answer. –  kadalamittai Feb 22 '11 at 13:42
    
That was helpful, Thomas. :) –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 22 '11 at 4:18
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Don't worry about the sensor technology, it's probably the least important thing to consider when deciding on your equipment set. It'd be like thinking of whether Kodak or Fuji black and white film is "best", without considering the camera you're going to use it in, the lenses you're going to use, or your skills as a photographer.

Think glass, not sensor.

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CCDs can have "electronic shutters"; they can be electronically "turned off" before the mechanical shutter closes.

With this feature, you can achieve higher flash sync speeds. For instance, the Nikon D70s and its electronically-shuttered CCD can sync at 1/500s.

CMOS sensors typically can't do this, so they're limited to how fast the mechanical shutter can close. The Nikon D90, for instance, has a max flash sync speed of 1/250s.

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This is one of the things I take advantage of with my 1D. Having the ability to cut out an additional stop of ambient light when shooting with strobes can mean the difference between having ghosting or not. –  Greg Apr 12 '11 at 3:15
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Off topic, but isn't the fast sync achieved by strobing the flash to fully illuminate the sensor as the less-than-full-size shutter opening passes through the frame? –  smigol Oct 3 '12 at 16:50
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There are more differences between CMOS and CCD. CMOS sensors are much cheaper then CCD sensors.
It is a lot cheaper to produce CMOS sensor, then produce dificult to make CCD sensor.
CMOS sensor consume less power then CCD sensor which is good for your battery life, and overheating.
Also, you can integrate lot more functions in single CMOS chip, which enables manufacturers to reduce number of chips in their cameras. For example, image capturing and processing can be integrated in one chip, which reduces the costs.

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