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I am using a HD Video Camera with a max resolution of 1920x1080. It is a Canon Legria HF M32.

I would like to record the videos using my PC. I have a component cable to USB adapter. My problem is the max resolution this allows me to record at is roughly 700x500.

Is there a way to record at a higher resolution on my PC?

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closed as off-topic by Matt Grum, mattdm, AJ Henderson, MikeW, cmason Feb 6 at 21:00

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question is about video in a context that is not likely to be relevant to still photography." – Matt Grum, mattdm, AJ Henderson, MikeW, cmason
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
This is something that would fit better on SuperUser i think? –  Darko Z Feb 6 at 11:34
3  
This question seems to be off-topic since this is more about video than photo. You could try to ask this question over at Video Production –  Yao Bo Lu Feb 6 at 11:36
    
The video camera appears to have the ability to capture still pictures - so if the question and answers are tweaked to include transferring those as well, it could (just about) be on-topic here. –  dav1dsm1th Feb 6 at 20:49
    
@dav1dsm1th - that is incorrect. Just because a camera is able to take still images doesn't make a question about the use of such a device on-topic unless what you are trying to do with it is photo related. Video capture from a camera, whether camcorder, smartphone, dslr or point and shoot is still off-topic. –  AJ Henderson Feb 6 at 21:07
    
@AJHenderson - so if a camera can take still pictures and video, questions about transferring still pictures would be off-topic? –  dav1dsm1th Feb 6 at 21:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Component video (the cable with the red/green/blue connectors) can be an HD output but is analogue so won't be as faithful a reproduction as you might want.

With output at 500 lines (pixels high) it sounds like you're using a composite video connection (the Red/White/Yellow connectors.) This is common on most consumer video capture devices and is limited to SD (and even then fairly poor quality). Therefore you're getting the best you can expect using that method. If you're in a PAL region you might get an extra 100 lines as NTSC is about 500 lines and PAL about 600.

What you need to do is get the software (from the Canon website) and connect the camera to the USB port of your machine where you can copy the contents off at the best quality.

Canon HF M32 and accessories

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1  
According to the spec it has internal memory - but can also use an SDHC card (up to 32GB) - so you may be able to move footage to the card (assuming you own one) and read it straight onto your PC/Mac from the card which may be quicker and less hassle than using a cable. –  dav1dsm1th Feb 6 at 13:00
1  
You could do that too, but I figure the cabled usb connection would be easier otherwise they'll be asking us how to do that too! XD –  James Snell Feb 6 at 14:07
2  
This is incorrect, component (3 [red/green/blue] or 5 [red/green/blue/yellow/black] cables) can be HD or higher, composite (1 [yellow] cable) is SD. That said, the OP is most likely inaccurate saying it was component. It sounds like a composite capture device. The easy way to keep them straight is to remember that composite puts R/G/B together in a composite signal. Component breaks it out in to individual Red, Green and Blue components (and sometimes separate horizontal and vertical timing signals as well [u/v]) –  AJ Henderson Feb 6 at 15:09
2  
Also, for clarity, composite capture devices will still have 3 cables generally, but the white and red cables are for audio, not video information. They are no different from a typical stereo audio feed. The white and red audio is often used with either component or composite video feeds. –  AJ Henderson Feb 6 at 15:17
1  
@AJHenderson You're absolutely right, well spotted and thanks for the correction. I'll update this answer. –  James Snell Feb 6 at 20:18

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