Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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Every behind the scenes photo/video I see shows a fixed setup for both cameras. Is this how it should be or it is like this because of the technical difficulties?

For example, assume that we are firing a laser from our eyes. Wherever we look, we will see that those lasers are intersecting. They will intersect at a closer point if we are looking to a very close point which is centred between our eyes (straight on the nose line).

If we apply this logic to shooting with a camera for a photo or video, shouldn't we actually rotate these cameras according to the subject that we have focus on?

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1 Answer 1

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Keep the cameras parallel and coplanar.

Unlike the human eye, most cameras have a flat, not spherical, sensor. That means that if you point the cameras in different directions, you will get a different perspective view from each. If you look at a rectangular object, for instance, one "eye" will see the left side of the object taller than the right, and the other "eye" will see the opposite. That effect will be there to an extent with parallel cameras, but it's more or less what your eyes will see in normal operation (because they are spatially separated). Aiming the cameras to converge will exaggerate the effect, making it more difficult for the brain to align the images.

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