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I want to use 2 iPhone 4 (not 4S or 5) to shoot 3d photo and video. What should be the distance between their lenses and how do you calculate it?

Update:

The actual focal length on iPhone 4 is 3.85mm.

The field of view (35mm SLR camera lens equivalent) for iPhone 4: 30mm

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There's nothing to calculate unless you are working with long distances (where you'd want to exaggerate the effect, such as for aerial photography of surface features) or macro-type close-ups (where a "true" effect would be the equivalent of trying to look at a bug on the end of your nose, each eye seeing only a 3/4 profile of the subject). For a realistic effect under more ordinary circumstances, use the average human interocular distance — about 2.5" or 60-65mm — unless technical considerations (the size of the cameras/lenses) get in the way, forcing you to go wider. That will give the view an image similar to what they would have seen with their own eyes.

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Thank you Stan. 35mm equivalent focal length is 30mm on iPhone, do you think that it matters? Or I just can crop it to match human fog after shooting? –  frankish Jul 14 '13 at 10:53
    
It doesn't matter at all unless you decide you want to exaggerate the effect (or, as noted, you're working at "abnormal" distances). What matters is the point of view offered to each eye, and that has little to do with the focal length, field of view, etc., if realism is your goal. –  user2719 Jul 14 '13 at 11:15
    
Avg. human interocular distance: 25" or 2.5"? –  Michael Clark Jul 14 '13 at 14:28
    
Honest to Pete, @MichaelClark, there was a frikkin' dot there when I typed it. Thanks. –  user2719 Jul 14 '13 at 15:15
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