Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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While this forum is about photography, most of the DSLRs today can be use for videography. What is the ideal focal length when doing a VTR or Video-Tape Recording? I'll be doing a video presentation with some interviews using my DSLR. I've heard that some people prefers using semi wide angle lens rather than standard 35mm or 50mm to create a wide area effect. Meanwhile others are also suggesting an 85mm f/1.8 to avoid distorting the subjects. So what lens should I go for? Should I go for semi wide angle or a semi telephoto? Or a standard focal length will do? Thanks for any answer.

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closed as off-topic by Matt Grum, Nir, Jez'r 570, mattdm, MikeW Jul 2 '13 at 10:16

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Videography questions are explicitly off-topic here - please post them at avp.stackexchance.com instead. – Philip Kendall Jul 2 '13 at 7:57
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oh thanks, I didn't know stackexchange have it. – Jez'r 570 Jul 2 '13 at 8:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's the same as photographing people, there isn't such thing as an ideal focal length - if there was all the camera companies wouldn't have to produce such an extensive lens lineup.

If you want to show a person in the environment you use a wider lens, if you want to focus just on one person you use a longer lens. If you want a specific effect you use whatever will produce this effect (for example, shallow DOF -> long, exaggerated perspective -> wide) and of course physical constraints of the shooting environment (have to place the camera far away -> long, don't have room and have to be really close -> wide)

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