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by Aditya

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Let's say I have an image of the Taj Mahal.

I want set the above image as my background image when taking the picture. Something similar to Photo Booth effects available in OS X, where you'll be asked to step out of the frame, then once the image is setup as the background, you'll be prompted to step inside the camera view.

Is there any camera that supports this effect?

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No, but it's easily achieved in Photoshop –  ElendilTheTall Feb 17 '13 at 8:37
    
Yes, but you need to be very good in PS, which I'm not.. –  Gokul Nath Feb 17 '13 at 8:41
    
How would it be any easier to do in the camera, with much more limited controls? You would still have to somehow pick out the part of the image you want to superimpose -- that's almost certainly easier to do on a computer than on a camera. –  Michael Kjörling Feb 17 '13 at 12:09
    
You don't have to be very good in photoshop at all. It's basic selection tool stuff, or you could use the built in extract tool to make it even easier. –  ElendilTheTall Feb 17 '13 at 12:11
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The way he describe how photobooth works it will actually perform better than your photoshopping masks, unless you have a wacom tablet and work professionally or are just a born natural controlling it. It was a typical assignment I gave to students at the media technology bachelor/master degree. It would definitely be possible to implement on a camera. This feature would be along the same lines as my Sony WX1 P&S, that stitches up multiple exposures (not in the HDR way) to overcome the bright performer, dark background situation (like a circus shot). –  Michael Nielsen Mar 5 '13 at 8:07

3 Answers 3

I know that some kids' digital cameras had or have the ability to do this with cartoon characters. And I bet there's iPhone and Android apps, the latter which may run on the new Android-based non-phone cameras from Samsung and Nikon. This kind of flexibility and power is exactly why you might want to have something like Android on your camera.

But, in general, this is not a common feature for digital point & shoot cameras, let along higher-end models. You'll definitely get better results doing it in post-production in an image manipulation tool on your computer.

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Short answer no.

Why would someone pay to buy a camera that adds the same background to all the images they make? isolating the subject and blending it into the background is not the task of a camera and would be very difficult to achieve. It is much easier to do on a computer.

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"Where can I get a camera that has feature X", you: "why would anyone want feature X". Not really helpful. As you can see we have at least one specimen who wants it. Look at mattdm's answer. –  Michael Nielsen Mar 5 '13 at 8:00

Actually ... I think the Canon 6D and 5D Mark III might have something similar I haven't tried it, but one can take "Multiple images" and composite them together either by averaging or additing. This functionality lets you pick an already taken image to use as the base image and then you take another.

The said other image is then superimposed using "additive" or "average" compositing.

It's fiddly and overall I don't think it's what you want.

I think you could achieve something similar if your base image is a bit dark, and your foreground is a person with an absolute black background. THen, additive might work out.

Dunno in the end.

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It's typically called "multiple exposure" mode, but yes, you can "merge" photos with that mode. –  Dan Wolfgang Jan 31 at 1:47

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