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Ok, time has come to buy external shutter release. I have Nikon D5100, and I looked at nikon official page, they offer wireless shutter release, and cable release.
Unfortunately, wireless release is working with IR technology, and I think that is a little bit of problem for me, because I'm very interested in long exposure pictures (100s). So I looked for another wireless devices, and on Amazon I found this one.

In the description I read that range of this device is 30m. So therefore it can't be IR technology?! It has 2 parts, first one is a classic cable release (it can work without a second device), in which is embedded wireless receiver which can be paired with second device (wireless transmitter).

So, when buying this device you get wireless remote and cable release in one.

Has someone else bought this device? Does this device have a lock mode for taking pictures in bulb mode? Especially when using wireless receiver? In amazon comments, I didn't see that someone had used it with a Nikon D5100?

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Use IR. I did it. Click once opens the shutter, click a second time closes it. –  Unapiedra Feb 6 '13 at 19:02
    
Why not use a 2/5/10 second delay timer that is built in if you're planning to use that for long exposures? Set the timer to 2 seconds, hit the button and let go of the camera...:-) –  vspicture Feb 6 '13 at 19:39
    
But if I use Bulb mode, I need exposures greater than 30 seconds. If I don't have remote release device, I have to push/release shutter release button on my camera, and there is 99% of shaking it! –  D4Am Feb 6 '13 at 20:15
    
I agree that for the bulb mode, this won't be the best solution. However, I don't see a point in using wireless trigger. For long exposures wired triggers work just as well (even better, since there's no interference, dead batteries to deal with, etc). You can buy one for $25 off the Amazon: amazon.com/Nikon-25395-MC-DC2-Remote-Release/dp/B001F6TXME –  vspicture Feb 6 '13 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

Sorry to state that, yes it seems very good in price and capability but I have tried neewer shutter release, they defect very easily and quickly. Cheap alloys and bad manufacturing I presume.

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The product on Amazon appears to use radio of some sort, probably RF as there's an aerial.

For long bulb exposures I wouldn't use a radio trigger as your relying on the battery and signal for a long time. I'd go with a wired release.

You have the option to use the Nikon MC-DC2 (listed as compatible with the D5100) or any one of the far cheaper copies. Which you go for will depend on budget and how much you think you will use it to justify the price increase. These all have a locking switch so you can lock the shutter open for as long as you want.

edit: Also worth mentioning is the IR trigger in bulb isn't a press and hold it's press to open, press to close. But I still don't like the IR trigger I have and have just ordered a cable release.

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The product description on the page you link to states that it is 433 MHz, so it is radio (RF), not IR.

Product Description

This wireless remote shutter release is very useful and helpful gear for prevent vibration when taking photos under long exposures, close-ups (macro) or continuous shooting. It can instantly trigger the shutter without disturbing the camera in the distance. Widely used to minimize the camera shake for macro shooting or long time exposure, or used to take subjects that are difficult to approach. The frequency is 433 MHZ and receiver uses 2 AAA batteries.

Its maximum working distance is up to 30M in open area without blockage.

Compatible With Nikon:

D5100, D3100, D7000, D5000, D90

The same page also states that it supports bulb mode

To control single-frame, continuous-frame and bulb mode, supports 3.5 seconds delay shoot

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