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Note: this is a repost. I initially posted it on the "adobe lightroom" group on Flickr. But so far, I've not received any useful answers. So I'm trying so see if it connects here.

When I try to use tethered capture in LR4 directly from my Canon 50D, it becomes unresponsive if I shoot a handful of shots in rapid succession.

I'm not doing streams, rather I'm shooting portraits with strobes, so the lights take a half second or so to recycle. But LR4 and my camera can't keep up.

To do a bit of problem isolation, I've done testing with the same setup using Canon's bundled "DPP (Digital Photo Professional)" utility. Its much faster than LR4. With DPP, I can shoot as many photos as I want, say 20 in 4 or 5 seconds. With LR4, I get backed up after as few as four or so.

My computer is a Macbook Pro with 4 core processor and 8GB of real RAM. Nothing else is running on the computer.

Are there tricks or settings to make LR4 be faster when tethered?

I'd love to shoot and capture at once, but its just too slow. Thanks

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2 Answers 2

DPP has always been the fastest tethered option for Canon Cameras.

Keep DPP open for the preview and have it all dropped into a Lightroom live folder at the same time.

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Maybe the memory gets full with the multiple camera images you are taking.

If you dont want to bring your computer everywhere, and all the cables, consider wireless tethering

http://nsmi76.wix.com/cam-os

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Why would that happen with LR but not DPP? –  mattdm Nov 29 '12 at 18:33
    
The computer has 8 gig of RAM. The 50D has a 15 mb sensor. So one could hold roughly 500 photos in ram before running out of memory. Of course, it would not do that, as the whole point of tethering is to store the photos to the computer's disk. It should be able to store at least 100 photos in memory and buffer the images to the disk. –  Pat Farrell Nov 29 '12 at 23:28

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