Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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I want to bring the roll position displayed back to Zero. How can I do this without having any film in the camera?

If i rotate the cylinder (by hand) that is connected (perhaps) to the film advance lever on the inside of the camera, still the dial does not show change in the position (still at "S.."). Is this normal?

Earlier I ended up wounding the entire film without any change to this dial.

The shutter button is stuck too (this is perhaps because the roll position is at "S.." )

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't know about your specific model, but many roll film cameras will not reset the exposure count until you open the film door (the back of the camera). That was pretty much universal among the 35mm SLRs and rangefinders I've owned over the years. The frame count is generally hooked up mechanically to the film advance mechanism, which is disengaged when the film is being rewound (the rewind button releases a toothed clutch on the take-up spool, disconnecting it from the film advance and shutter-cocking gear train).

The "S..." is probably indicating that the start of the film (the tongue) hasn't been moved yet. You normally have to advance two frames before you actually get to usable film (since the tongue protrudes and will be exposed when loading). Try "dry firing" the camera without any film loaded. You should see the frame counter advancing as you shoot (provided that you aren't pressing the rewind button at the time). If that's working properly, the problem is either with the way you've loaded the film or with that particular roll of film (a mechanical problem within the canister).

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I never get a chance to answer something before Stan Rogers does. He is correct as usual. The exposure count isn't usually set until the film is correctly wound into the camera. –  Clara Onager Nov 1 '12 at 12:38
    
@ClaraOnager - you merely have to develop a horrible case of insomnia (mine is induced by my Parkinson's medications). Then again, it's time I sat back and let other people answer too—you seem to have enough knowledge to be a leader here as well, going by your comment history. –  user2719 Nov 1 '12 at 13:19
    
@StanRogers I did not know the exposure counter was hooked on to the film door :) –  Wildling Nov 1 '12 at 15:14

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