Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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I'd like to buy a Canon EOS 60D, but I have a problem with the position of the depth of field test button.

When using the camera in portrait mode, with the battery grip on, I'd like to know if you have problems to push it? I don't have big hands, and I don't see how this can be reached easily. How do you do yourself with small hands-portrait-grip ?

On my Nikon D300, it is nearly at the same position, but not oriented the same way (it points to the camera, not the lens), so I don't have problem to push it with my first finger. On the 60D, it seems to be faaar from the hand, and so tiny that I don't see how to use it without making strange figures with the hand.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You may have to move your right hand to get to it (the DoF preview buttons tend to be in an awkward position these days, and not just on the 60D), but that really shouldn't be a problem unless you're trying to hand-hold a flash at the same time (or are disabled; my apologies if you are) — your left hand should ordinarily be supporting the camera in a stable shooting position anyway. If your left hand is palm-down (or palm-outward) rather than palm-up (or palm-inward, with the heel of your hand supporting the camera body), it's time to get into a new grip habit. Your right hand should be for fine control (and button-pressing/dial-twiddling), not for supporting the camera.

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I agree, but using my right hand to fine control (what I always do), I feel hard on the 60D to push the button and control the wheel to change the aperture at the same time, without having to make an "eagle" hand. –  Oliver Oct 10 '12 at 23:13
    
Is there a particular reason why you need to do both at the same time? (For most of my life, I've used cameras where that would be physically impossible. Kids these days...) –  user2719 Oct 10 '12 at 23:20
    
:-) In fact, I like to precisely adjust the depth of field viewing the change in a live situation. So I press the DOF test button, then I change the aperture value and stop when I reach the DOF I'm looking for. Doing this 3-4 times is not natural to me, and I don't like to solicit a hardware part more than necessary. –  Oliver Oct 11 '12 at 21:22
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