Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Take the 2-minute tour ×
Photography Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional, enthusiast and amateur photographers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've read several times that a 50mm lens will make features like noses noticeably stand out compared to an 85mm lens. However, I'm never sure if the post/article is describing results on a full frame or crop sensor. I know that the longer the focal length, the more the compression to features....because the crop sensor gives a 50mm a longer focal length, how noticeable is the facial distortion on say, a Canon 550D? I'm considering a prime for portrait work and I'm 'at the crossroads' like all of you who came before me ;)

EDIT I will generally be using the lens for wedding portraits on the beach (and they generally want to get married around sunset, so formal portraits come as I'm losing light---hence wanting a tack sharp f1.8 or below), so it would be handy to have a lens that can take more than just a head/shoulder shot.

share|improve this question
5  
Blog to the rescue, check this (this was on a crop sensor) out. And having done much with a 50mm and 85mm - 85mm all the way, but its really just an opinion. –  rfusca Jul 16 '12 at 14:31
3  
    
I don't know what your budget looks like, but you can get both the Canon 50/1.8 and 85/1.8 for around $500. While not pocket change, they're both relatively cheap in the world of lenses. (Another way to look at it: if you decide to get the 85mm f/1.8 you can tack on the 50mm f/1.8 for only 25% more.) –  drewbenn Jul 16 '12 at 17:32
    
I've been trying to find a way to phrase this exact question. Thanks for doing it far more succintly than I could have. –  seanmc Jul 16 '12 at 22:15
2  
As a note related to @dpollitt's answer, while you may get an acceptable exposure at f/1.2 or f/1.4, you may find yourself tossing away a lot of properly exposed shots because the depth of field was too shallow and your AF chose the wrong feature to focus on. Example: if shooting at f/1.2 and AF chooses the tip of the nose, the eyes will be out of focus. For me, that can ruin a shot. The standard answer of "focus manually" would seem just right until you consider the fact that people actually move. It's a tough nut to crack, that wide-open aperture one. –  Steve Ross Jul 17 '12 at 20:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think Eric's answer is what I have been trying to justify to myself. I'm going to try to explain it, and I hope I get it right (I know people will correct me if I'm wrong!).

That is, it is the distance that determines the compression/disortion, not the focal length. However to get the same framing on a crop-sensor vs. a full-frame sensor, you'd need to change the distance if using the same lens on each camera.

In other words, a 57mm focal length on a 1.5x crop sensor, should provide the same perspective and framing as an 85mm focal length on a full-frame sensor if shot from the same distance.

Now, it seems that 85mm-105mm is most recommended for portraits (full-frame), so a 50mm on a crop-sensor might be too wide (you'd have to get in tighter and introduce more distortion). I think this is why you'll see people using a 70mm (like a 70-200mm) for portaits on a crop-sensor (yielding an effective 105mm on full-frame).

share|improve this answer
    
Great point about having to move in closer to get the shot on a 50mm and introducing distortion. I definitely want to get a prime, though, so I think I'll play around with my zoom lens as another poster suggested at 50 and at 85 and see which I like best. –  huzzah Jul 17 '12 at 14:00

I've read several times that a 50mm lens will make features like noses noticeably stand out compared to an 85mm lens

What you read was likely referring to full frame or equivalent focal lengths of 50 and 85mm.

In any case a 50mm lens on an APS-C sensor will allow you to take well framed portraits at a distance which doesn't cause any undesirable perspective effects on noses etc. I have shot a great many three quarters shots with a 50mm lens on APS-C.

Whether you chose 50 or 85 is a matter of preference, how you prefer to work and how much space you have. Personally I like to go longer (as it tends to give you more subject separation from the background) but it can be a pain when you don't have room!

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of separation from the background...honestly, the majority of portrait work I'd be doing would be beach wedding portraits, so what's behind me isn't generally an issue. I suppose, though, that the 50mm would be handier for more than the usual head/shoulders shot, since it's wider. –  huzzah Jul 16 '12 at 15:28
    
I agree it is just preference. I have both, and prefer the 50mm on an APS-C. –  dpollitt Jul 17 '12 at 0:58

You are correct that a 50mm lens on a cropped sensor camera will be more suited to close-up photography than on a full frame sensor. The smaller sensor size means that you don't need to get as close to the subject to fill the frame, meaning there is not the same distortion of the nose in particular.

Having said that, the answer really depends on your personal style; if you can get your hands one one of each types of lens (e.g. rented, or in a camera shop) and try them out on a willing subject (you could take a friend with you to the shop :D ) you'd get a better idea of which lens works best with your style.

share|improve this answer

For headshots, 85mm will perform much better than 50mm. If you shoot family portraits, then 50mm might be a better option.

Apart from the focal length, you might want to look into the out of focus control or number of diaphragm blades as they determine the quality of the bokeh.

share|improve this answer

The focal length doesn't affect distortion or compression as you're describing. Only distance to subject can change that.

What focal length and sensor size affect is the magnification of the subject from a given distance. If you have a lens at least as wide as 50mm, you can determine for yourself what you want. What do you want your working distance to be? Take sample photos from that, as well as other distances. Find the distance you find most flattering. Determine the crop that you need to apply to make the subject as large in the frame as you want. From that, you'll be able to determine the best focal length for your working distance and your tastes.

Eric

share|improve this answer
    
Good points. I am finding the answer here is generally a consensus on "they're both good, stick with the one you like the best".... –  huzzah Jul 17 '12 at 14:02

I'd suggest you take one of your existing zoom lenses (or borrow one) and set it on 50mm, shoot for a while, then set it on 85mm and shoot for awhile. Think about how well the focal length suits your shooting style. Then... look at the images and see whether you find the 85mm shots more appealing than the 50mm ones.

I shoot with an 85mm f1.2 and a couple of things: You almost never need that fast a lens and the cost may not be worth the number of shots made at that aperture. The depth of field at 1.2 is not sufficient to shoot pictures of people unless you are looking for a specific selective focus effect. One thing (and I'm using a full-frame DSLR) about shooting with the 85mm is that I find myself backing into things sometimes to get enough space to work. That's why I recommend you try the focal length in your intended shooting environment. If I'm feeling cramped with an 85mm, I imagine you would feel more cramped using a crop sensor in the same circumstances.

share|improve this answer
    
That is an excellent suggestion. I think because I'm on a crop sensor the answer is going to be fairly subjective and full of opinions here....just gonna have to find which I like best. –  huzzah Jul 17 '12 at 14:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.